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caption: USS Johnston (DD-557) off Seattle or Tacoma, Washington, 27 October 1943.
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USS Johnston (DD-557) off Seattle or Tacoma, Washington, 27 October 1943.

What lies 21,180 feet under the sea

The world's deepest shipwreck isn't 20,000 leagues under the sea. It's 21,180 feet below the ocean surface, at the bottom of the Philippine Sea. The World War Two Navy Destroyer called the USS Johnston sank in 1944. This month, ocean explores dove underwater to map it. Plus, why some healthcare workers are hesitant to get the vaccine, Washington's new mermaid museum, and the future plans of Top Chef contestant, and Seattle chef, Shota Nakajima.

Individual segments are available in our podcast stream or at www.kuow.org/record.

Exploring the USS Johnston 21,000 feet below sea

The world's deepest shipwreck isn't 20,000 leagues under the sea. It's 21,180 feet below the ocean surface, at the bottom of the Philippine Sea. The World War Two Navy Destroyer called the USS Johnston sank in 1944. This month, ocean explores with Caladan Oceanic dove underwater to map it. Bill Radke spoke to the founder, and the lead explorer for the Johnson expedition, Victor Vescovo.

Vaccine hesitancy in healthcare workers

Last month, the Kaiser Family Foundation and the Washington Post surveyed health workers nationwide and nearly one in five said they didn't plan on receiving a vaccine. Why would medical professionals be hesitant to get vaccinated? Bill Radke spoke to Dr. Leo Morales, assistant dean at the office of healthcare equity at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and to Seattle Times reporter Sandi Doughton, who recently wrote about vaccine hesitancy among health workers.

Washington's mermaid musem

The Pacific Northwest might seem like an unlikely place for mermaids and mermaid culture to catch on given the cold water here. Yet, putting on an eye-catching tail and pretending to be a mythical sea being is a thing across the Northwest. There's even a brand new mermaid museum near Aberdeen, Washington. That’s where Correspondent Tom Banse dove into the scene.

Top chef contestant Shota Nakajima

Last year did not start out well for Shota Nakajima. In March, he opened a new restaurant on Capitol Hill called Taku. Five days later everything shut down. His other Capitol Hill restaurant, Adana, closed, too. And suddenly this chef who'd gotten so much critical praise for his restaurants didn't have a restaurant. But he's found other ways to stay busy. Bill Radke spoke to Shota about competing on Bravo's Top Chef: Portland, and reopening his restaurant Taku.