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caption: Cindy Hill wears a garbage bag and handkerchief while joining a nationwide protest demanding PPE for healthcare workers on Thursday, April 9, 2020, outside of Evergreen Health in Monroe.
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Cindy Hill wears a garbage bag and handkerchief while joining a nationwide protest demanding PPE for healthcare workers on Thursday, April 9, 2020, outside of Evergreen Health in Monroe.
Credit: KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

A year later, what has the pandemic taught us about how to prepare for the next great emergency?

The beginning of the pandemic was chaotic. Remember the empty shelves, the desert of PPE, and the competition for essential resources from state to state? With another big emergency inevitable -- whether a wildfire, earthquake, or pandemic -- we look at what needs to happen to avoid chaos. Plus, how an urban farm is bringing biodiversity and homegrown community health to Beacon Hill. And, we take your calls for our weekly conversation with Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan.

Individual segments are available in our podcast stream or at www.kuow.org/record.

The procurement puzzle: how to avoid shortages in a disaster

Even the best preparations for disaster can fail to meet the unexpected. Take this pandemic, for example. So what can we do to prepare? Bill Radke speaks with Ben Brunjes, professor at the University of Washington Evans School Public Policy and Governance, about the pandemic procurement lessons we should learn for the future.

How an urban farm is bringing biodiversity to Beacon Hill

It can be hard to farm and grow plants in a city like Seattle. One, land is expensive; and two, our modular living situations can make finding the right plants difficult. But where and what we grow is important. Bill Radke speaks with Nyema Clark, executive director for Nurturing Roots, a quarter acre urban farm in Beacon Hill.

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan 4.29.21

Bill Radke is joined by Mayor Durkan for our weekly conversation, and we take your calls on policing and vaccination.