skip to main content
caption: 'To stop police violence, we must abolish the police,' reads chalk writing on a sidewalk at the intersection of 11th Avenue and East Pine Street on Tuesday, April 20, 2021, following the reading of the guilty verdict in the trial of Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd, in Seattle.
Enlarge Icon
'To stop police violence, we must abolish the police,' reads chalk writing on a sidewalk at the intersection of 11th Avenue and East Pine Street on Tuesday, April 20, 2021, following the reading of the guilty verdict in the trial of Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd, in Seattle.
Credit: KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

With Derek Chauvin convicted, The Record looks at George Floyd's impact on Seattle

Derek Chauvin, who kneeled on the neck of George Floyd for more than nine minutes, causing his death, was found guilty on three counts of murder by a Minnesota jury yesterday. Floyd's murder spurred a national movement against police violence and brutality, including here in Seattle, where protestors marched for 11 straight days. For the full hour of today's show we speak with those who have covered the movement galvanized by Floyd's death and those overseeing police accountability and reform here in Washington State.

Individual segments are available in our podcast stream or at www.kuow.org/record.

Victoria Beach, Chair to The African American Advisory Council to the Seattle Police Department

The African American Community Advisory Council works with the Seattle Police Department on issues of public safety, cultural competency, and aims to foster goodwill and trust between the SPD and the African American Community. Victoria Beach joins Bill Radke to discuss her thoughts on the Derek Chauvin verdict and what improvements still need to be made in Seattle policing.

Omari Salisbury, Converge Media

When protestors took to the streets last May, Omari Salisbury was there to document everything happening on the street, talking with protestors and police as Seattle grappled with police violence locally. Omari joined Bill Radke to discuss the impact George Floyd of on Seattle, and what remains to be done when it comes to police reform going forward.

Journalists Paul Kiefer and Mark Obie on police accountability

George Floyd's murder brought renewed scrutiny to policing in local departments and legislatures. Here in Washington State, a series of police accountability bills have already made their way through the State Legislature. Bill Radke is joined by Paul Kiefer, a police accountability reporter with PubliCola, and Mark Obbie, a freelance criminal justice reporter, to discuss the wide-ranging impacts of this year's police reform movement.

Monica Alexander, Interim Executive Director of the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission

How effective are changes in policing law if toxic cultures continue to exist in police departments? Bill Radke speaks with Monica Alexander about the importance of training in curbing police violence, and what needs to happen for concrete change to happen in the culture of policing.