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caption: Jourdan Keith.
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Jourdan Keith.
Credit: KUOW Photo/Amina Al-Sadi

'When the blue bin rumbles' - Seattle's Civic Poet on finding poetry in a pandemic

In her poem "Essential", Seattle Civic Poet Jourdan Keith writes: "In the dayless daze of quarantine, it is not the pale gray wisps in fuchsia sunsets that let me know the human world is okay. It is the morning, it is Tuesday, When the blue bin rumbles." Keith spoke to host Bill Radke about creating poetry during a pandemic. Plus, the struggle of Covid long-haulers, how the Puget Sound's public transit might change with the pandemic, and how Costco manages to keep their chickens so darn cheap.

Individual segments are available in our podcast stream or at www.kuow/org/record.

When the blue bin rumbles - finding poetry in a pandemic

In her poem "Essential", Seattle Civic Poet Jourdan Keith writes: "In the dayless daze of quarantine, it is not the pale gray wisps in fuchsia sunsets that let me know the human world is okay. It is the morning, it is Tuesday, When the blue bin rumbles." Keith spoke to host Bill Radke about creating poetry during a pandemic.

Covid long-haulers' battle for wellness

A new University of Washington study finds up to 30% of Covid patients are still suffering from at least one symptom nine months after their diagnosis. KUOW reporter Eilis O'Neill looked into why that is, and how it's effected the lives of so called Covid long-haulers.

The future of Puget Sound public transit

This pandemic has shaken up a lot of industries, including services deemed essential - like Public Transit. So what does this pandemic mean for the future of transit? KUOW host Ross Reynolds spoke to the leaders of Community Transit Snohomish County, Pierce County Transit and King County Metro to find out.

How those Costco chickens stay so cheap

Lots of locals here feel hometown pride that Costco is based in Issaquah, is relatively eco-friendly, pays its workers relatively well and treats them decently. Well, the human workers anyway. A recent report by the New York Times shows that their $4.99 roasted chickens do not receive the same treatment. Bill Radke spoke to Washington attorney Cynthia Hodges about what's legal when it comes to poultry farming.