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caption: In this Jan. 7, 2021, file photo, the Legislative Building is shown partially shrouded in fog at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash. Washington state's richest residents, including Bill Gates and Jeff Bezos, would pay a wealth tax on certain financial assets worth more than $1 billion under a proposed bill whose sponsor says she is seeking a fair and equitable tax code. Lawmakers are also considering a capital gains tax.
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In this Jan. 7, 2021, file photo, the Legislative Building is shown partially shrouded in fog at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash. Washington state's richest residents, including Bill Gates and Jeff Bezos, would pay a wealth tax on certain financial assets worth more than $1 billion under a proposed bill whose sponsor says she is seeking a fair and equitable tax code. Lawmakers are also considering a capital gains tax.
Credit: AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

A historic session for the Washington legislature

Bill Radke sits down with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins to discuss what passed during this season in the Washington legislature. Plus, how Washington police policies can move from accountability to justice, and who should be on PCC's board of trustees.

Individual segments are available in our podcast stream or at www.kuow.org/record.

What made this legislative session so important

In a speech on Sunday Governor Inslee said that "this session’s accomplishments are as important to the long-term well-being of our state as any session I’ve seen in a quarter of a century." That's a big statement. KUOW's Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins tells Bill Radke why the Governor's right.

How to move from police accountability to justice

This legislative session saw a raft of police accountability measures passed to the Governor's desk to become law. But Naomi Ishisaka, Seattle Times columnist and assistant managing editor for diversity, inclusion and staff development, says that's not enough. That we must move from holding police accountable to demanding justice.

PCC employee Donna Rasmussen on the race for Board of Trustees

PCC grocery stores are a Seattle institution - for decades they had a hippie reputation they were early to the idea of being a locally owned co-op devoted to fresh, seasonal, organic food. Well now, a couple of store workers say the chain of 15 PCC markets is in danger of losing some of its soul. Donna Rasmussen has been a PCC cashier for seven years. She and a customer service clerk named Laurae McIntyre are running for the PCC board. *Disclosure note: PCC is a business supporter of KUOW

PCC CEO Suzy Monford on the race for Board of Trustees

PCC is currently holding elections for their board of trustees. Two company employees are running for the position. The company’s upper management is not endorsing their candidacies - PCC's President and CEO Suzy Monford explains why. *Disclosure note: PCC is a business supporter of KUOW