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caption: The kraken illustrated on the 1954 movie poster for Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.
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The kraken illustrated on the 1954 movie poster for Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.

The Kraken comes to town

RELEASE IT. STEM in the ancient world, and the first American Girl doll who is also… a millennial.

Individual segments are available in our podcast stream or at www.kuow.org/record.

Release the Kraken - on ice

At some point in the future, the pandemic will end. We’ll be sitting together in a stadium without fear: eating snacks, enjoying beverages, and cheering for the Seattle Kraken. To learn more about the myth behind the monster, Marcie Sillman spoke to Lauren Poyer, assistant teaching professor of Scandinavian Studies at the University of Washington.

Silicon Valley, meet Rift Valley

You’re reading this on a device with processing power that would have been unthinkable even twenty years ago. We’ve got quantum computing and self-driving cars. But University of Washington Classics professor Sarah Stroup says we shouldn’t be too self-congratulatory about our current technology. She teaches a class called STEM in the Ancient World, and she spoke about it with Bill Radke.

Courtney, the 1980s American Girl

American Girl doll Rebecca is a first-generation immigrant in 1914, struggling to uphold her family’s Russian traditions in a radically changing city while dreaming of becoming an actress. American Girl doll Courtney’s epic historical backdrop is… 1986, and her struggles include becoming Pac-Man champion at the mall arcade. Alison Horrocks and Mary Mahoney, cohosts of the podcast American Girls, discuss the first doll who could be their contemporary.