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caption: An empty classroom in Parrington Hall where Bangally Fatty was enrolled and taking a class is shown on the University of Washington campus on Thursday, November 16, 2017, in Seattle.
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An empty classroom in Parrington Hall where Bangally Fatty was enrolled and taking a class is shown on the University of Washington campus on Thursday, November 16, 2017, in Seattle.
Credit: KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

How Washington schools persist through pandemic-driven closures

A talk with the state superintendent. Some folks can now drive up to get tested for COVID-19: with some caveats. And flattening the curve – what happens if we do, and what happens if we don’t.

Listen to the full show by clicking the play button above, or check out one of the show’s segments below. You can also subscribe to The Record on your favorite podcast app.

State superintendent Reykdal on school closures

Washington schools are closed until at least April 24th, but state superintendent Chris Reykdal says he expects all school districts to provide food, childcare for the most vulnerable, and eventually some version of distance learning. He took your calls to explain how.

UW Medicine drivethrough testing

Drive-through coronavirus testing is now available for UW Medical patients. KUOW reporter John Ryan drove over to see how it works.

Flatten the Curve: the curve

During this pandemic, you may have heard about the concept of “flattening the curve.” That curve is the number of cases of COVID-19, and some countries are seeing excellent results. Hong Kong is one of them. We spoke to Seattle-based nurse and Doctors Without Borders field coordinator Karin Huster.

Flatten the Curve: the line

To attempt to flatten the curve here in Washington, schools and restaurants are shut down. Large gatherings are banned. People are working from home and keeping a social distance. That’s the first part of graph, the curve. The other piece of it is the dotted line. That represents the healthcare system, which in Italy is already in crisis. Critical care physician Mark Tonelli joined Bill Radke to discuss what it would look like if that happened here.