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caption: A protester runs from tear gas at the intersection of 5th and Pine Streets on Saturday, May 30, 2020, in Seattle.
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A protester runs from tear gas at the intersection of 5th and Pine Streets on Saturday, May 30, 2020, in Seattle.
Credit: KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Does the city council have the last word on tear gas?

Why police officers aren’t quite ready to strike a deal. Shootings in the protest zone, and their aftermath. How to abolish the police. The ethics of vaccine trials. And echoes of the Civil Rights Movement on the streets of Seattle again.

Individual segments are available in our podcast stream or at www.kuow.org/record.

Lisa Daugaard, SPOG tear gas bargaining

The city council has approved a ban on the use of tear gas by the Seattle Police Department. But can that be bargained? The police officers’ guild certainly thinks so. In order to learn more, Ross Reynolds spoke to Lisa Daugaard, former co-chair of the Community Police Commission.

Bobbie Stills, CHOP shooting

There were two shootings over the weekend in the Capitol Hill Organized Protest Zone. Converge Media producer Bobbie Stills was in the area during the first shooting, and told his story.

Abolitionist social worker

In the conversation around police abolition, one oft-touted suggestion is to move some functions of policing to social workers. But the profession has its own history of racism to be reckoned with, says social worker and abolitionist Patanjali de la Rocha.

End of hydroxychloroquine trial

Science doesn’t happen in a vacuum, and everything from vaccines to clinical trials has been politicized in the race to find treatment for COVID-19. Benjamin Wilfond is director of the Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Ethics at Seattle Children’s Hospital.

Colleen McElroy feat

Demonstrators around the region continue to call for an end to police brutality. Some see echoes of the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. Seattle poet Colleen McElroy was part of that movement, and sees the parallels; KUOW’s Marcie Sillman brought us her story.