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Patricia Murphy

Host

About

Patricia Murphy is an award-winning radio journalist who has covered justice, public health, military and veterans affairs for 20 years. She’s currently the host of KUOW’s daily news podcast, Seattle Now.

Her reporting has been recognized with an Edward R. Murrow Award for a 2005 documentary on IV drug use, and an Excellence in Health Care Journalism Award from the Association of Healthcare Journalists for a 2011 collaboration with the Seattle Times about chronic orthopedic injuries in the military.

A 2018 series focusing on narratives of young people who carry guns won a regional Edward R. Murrow award for Excellence in Innovation. She’s also a member of the Dart Society -- a network of journalists who cover trauma, conflict and social injustice.

Patricia is a graduate of Boston’s Emerson College and a native of Clifton, New Jersey, where her first job was delivering The Herald News on her bicycle.

Podcasts

Stories

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    Casual Friday: 764-HERO to zero

    Washington hangs up its hotline for reporting HOV lane cheats. Seattle drivers are honking more. And it's officially fall, so get your daylight while you still can.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    How will the city's eviction ban end?

    Seattle's next mayor will have to decide how and when the city unwinds its pandemic evictions ban, because Mayor Durkan just extended it to January. How does this end? And where is the money that's supposed to be helping people out? Seattle Times real estate reporter Heidi Groover explains.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    A long road home

    Stable, permanent housing is at the heart of every long-term solution to the city’s homelessness crisis. KUOW’s Casey Martin tells us how it happened for one Seattleite who’d been homeless for a decade.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    When will M's fans see October baseball?

    The Mariners have 14 games left to play and about a one-percent chance of making the postseason... something they haven’t done since the iPod was invented 20 years ago. We get a pep talk from M’s announcer Rick Rizzs.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    Casual Friday: Thirsty for fall

    After a dusty, dry summer, Seattleites are in for more rain in one weekend than we got in three months. Microsoft learns remote work means longer workdays. And Macklemore moves from the thrift shop to the pro shop.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    Remembering the pandemic through objects

    While the pandemic is still raging, there are efforts to ensure we never forget how it has altered our lives. The Washington State History Museum is collecting artifacts (both tangible and digital) to commemorate how Washingtonians have experienced Covid. Head curator Margaret Wetherbee talks about the items they've collected so far and why it's important to document the pandemic while it's still happening.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    State vaxx mandate gets a legal challenge

    The clock is ticking for thousands of state workers facing Governor Inslee’s order to get vaccinated. But now almost a hundred have signed on to a lawsuit to avoid the jab and keep their jobs. KUOW’s Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins explains.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    I had breakthrough covid

    Vaccines are keeping people from getting seriously ill, but there’s still a lot of covid out there and even a mild case can be pretty brutal. So how do you size up the risk if you're fully vaccinated? NPR science reporter and editor Will Stone tells what he learned after getting surprised by covid last month.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    Casual Friday: Spider season

    King County is making plans to verify vaccine status, there's some hope for the Mariners and it's spider season in the Pacific Northwest.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    A 9/11 story of forgiveness

    This weekend marks 20 years since the September 11th, 2001 attacks that changed American life, and millions of lives around the world. Today, a story of how that event forever altered the life and purpose of one Seattleite.