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Caroline Chamberlain Gomez

Supervising Producer, Seattle Now

About

Caroline is the supervising producer on KUOW's daily news podcast Seattle Now. She has produced stories on everything from our southern resident killer whales to Washington's chaotic redistricting process. Additionally, she created the podcast's popular Friday show "Casual Friday." She is getting her masters degree in Human Centered Design and Engineering from the University of Washington and applies human-centered design to both her published work and behind-the-scenes processes. Previously at KUOW, she produced Battle Tactics For Your Sexist Workplace and Second Wave.

Before KUOW, she produced DnA: Design and Architecture and Good Food at KCRW in Los Angeles. She got her start in radio at UCLA where she worked for the small but mighty radio team on The Daily Bruin.

Location: Seattle

Languages: English, conversational German

Pronouns: she/her

Podcasts

Stories

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    A different kind of college education

    There’s been a lot of grim news for Seattle's community colleges since the pandemic. Declining enrollment and budget shortfalls have created massive problems for the system. But applied baccalaureate programs are offering a path for some students looking to level up their careers. Reporter Janelle Retka will tell us why they're so popular, and who could benefit from one.

  • Seattle Now Logo - NPR Network
    Seattle Now

    Tacoma tries a guaranteed basic income

    Basic income programs have been all the rage in policy circle, and Tacoma just tried it out. The city has been running a guaranteed income pilot, called GRIT. The program gave 110 low-income families money each month to help them with expenses they otherwise would not likely be able to afford. Abigail Lawson is the director of GRIT, Tacoma's guaranteed income pilot, and she shares what she learned.

  • Seattle Now Logo - NPR Network
    Seattle Now

    Ghost stories of the PNW

    Fall may have taken its sweet time to show up this year, but that hasn’t stopped us from wanting all the things we love about fall: Chunky sweaters, a cozy mug full of soup and ghost stories.

  • Seattle Now Logo - NPR Network
    Seattle Now

    JULIOOOO! and the end of the Mariners' playoff drought

    The Mariners playoff drought has ended, and a big reason why is Julio Rodriguez, a 21 year old from the Dominican Republic with big ambitions. Seattle Now’s Caroline Chamberlain Gomez talks about what it means to end the postseason drought and how Julio Rodriguez helped make it happen.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    Casual Friday with Eula Scott Bynoe and Andrew Walsh

    This week, Mayor Bruce Harrell unveiled a new budget that doubles down on policing. A new study determined a lot of people love Seattle and that a lot of people hate it too, and the Kraken is getting ready to introduce a new mascot. hmmm wonder what that’s going to look like. Podcaster Eula Scott Bynoe and TBTL’s Andrew Walsh break it all down.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    Designing an ~intentional~ hybrid work plan

    It looks like hybrid work schedules are here to stay for many of us. That’s especially true in Seattle, where we have the second highest number of remote workers in the country. That comes with some benefits, but also some tension. Anne Helen Petersen is the co-author of Out of Office: The Big Problem and Bigger Promise of Working from Home, and she explains how Seattle workplaces can be more intentional with their remote and hybrid work plans.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    Spider season returns

    You may have noticed... It’s spider season. Their webs are everywhere right now, but don't run away. We’re revisiting our conversation with the Burke Museum’s arachnid guy Rod Crawford. He’ll tell us what spiders we’re seeing, and how much you should worry about them getting into our houses.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    Starbucks invests in a frappufuture

    Last week, Starbucks unveiled a new strategy that pivots its focus from a cozy Italian cafe to one where icy, customizable drinks take center stage. To get there, the coffee giant plans to invest roughly 450 million in new equipment to make things more efficient for customers and Baristas. Like a new Clover machine the company says will produce freshly ground, freshly brewed, hot coffee in just 30 seconds. Business Insider reporter Mary Meisenzahl explains.