Arts & Life
Thunderpussy performing at the Sasquatch! Music Festival in May, 2018.
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Thunderpussy performing at the Sasquatch! Music Festival in May, 2018.

Seattle's "Thunderpussy" awaits Supreme Court ruling

The Seattle-based rock band will find out soon whether it can trademark the rights to its name deemed "scandalous" by trademark reviewers.

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments Monday, April 15, in a case that will help determine if Thunderpussy's name trademark is allowed.

The case, Iancu v. Brunetti, actually deals with a clothing company called FUCT that's fighting for its own trademark. Officials at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office have told Thunderpussy that what happens in that case will determine theirs.


The women who make up the band have said their brand is their business, and that owning the right to the name is important for the band's economic viability.

The focus of the case is a United States Code that bans registration of immoral or scandalous trademarks. Attorneys representing FUCT argue that the "scandalous" provision is unconstitutionally vague. If the Supreme Court rules in favor of the clothing company, trademark officials will not be able to deny other trademark applicants (such as Thunderpussy) on the grounds that their application is scandalous.

The U.S. Supreme Court is expected to rule by the end of June.

Thunderpussy first applied for trademark rights in May, 2015.

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