Taylor Lorenz, a staff writer with The Atlantic, was facing so much online harassment that she replaced her online photo with a portrait that appeared more masculine. It helped, because sexism.
Enlarge Icon
Taylor Lorenz, a staff writer with The Atlantic, was facing so much online harassment that she replaced her online photo with a portrait that appeared more masculine. It helped, because sexism.
Credit: Courtesy of Taylor Lorenz

Trolls, how do you decide who to harass online? Wait, Taylor Lorenz already knows

SO MANY of us use social media and the Internet for work. There's just no escaping it. But what happens when online harassment encroaches on your work life?

This is the second half of a special two-part episode of Battle Tactics For Your Sexist Workplace. You're gonna wanna go back and listen to part one if you haven't already! So. Many. Tactics.

Taylor Lorenz, a staff writer at The Atlantic, reports on the Internet because she loves the Internet. That's what this episode is, quintessentially — a love story, one that took a dark turn in 2016 when Lorenz was a senior editor at The Hill, a political newspaper based in D.C.

As Lorenz covered the presidential elections that year for The Hill, life as this internet-aficionado knew it changed drastically. Why? Because it's when she first encountered online trolls.

"As a woman, everything you do is questioned, your reporting is questioned," said Lorenz.

In this episode, Eula Scott Bynoe and Jeannie Yandel give you even more tactics to battle back against harassment that happens online. We know from our last episode that harassment happens by and large to women, LGBTQIA+ folks, and people of color — so what happens when it disrupts your work?

The answer is simple: you battle back. We've got tactics for that.

Click the play button above to hear the full episode. BTSW is also available on your favorite podcast app.

This episode of Battle Tactics For Your Sexist Workplace was hosted by Eula Scott Bynoe and Jeannie Yandel. It was produced and edited by Caroline Chamberlain Gomez.

Correction 11/26/2018 12:35 p.m.: An earlier version of this text incorrectly stated Taylor Lorenz' position during the 2016 election. She was a senior editor at The Hill.