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How one Washington man brought big tech to court

Facebook says they aren't selling political ads in Washington because of our rigorous transparency law. But people like Zach Wurtz, whose job it is to track those ads, are saying otherwise. So he did what he could - he took Facebook to court. Small claims court. It didn't quite go to plan. Plus, two discussion on the role of Japanese Americans during World War Two. As prisoners, soldiers, and contentious objectors.

Individual segments are available in our podcast stream or at www.kuow.org/record.

What happens when you take Facebook to court

Facebook says they aren't selling political ads in Washington because of our rigorous transparency law. But people like Zach Wurtz, whose job it is to track those ads, are saying otherwise. So he did what he could - he took Facebook to court. Small claims court, to be precise. It didn't quite go to plan. KUOW producer Alec Cowan and reporter Eli Sanders of the Wild West newsletter explain.

Facing the Mountain, by Daniel James Brown

In February 1942 the U.S. government began the forced relocation of 120 thousand Japanese Americans to remote relocation camps where they were captive for two years. Despite this treatment, there were many Japanese Americans who joined the military to fight in World War Two. KUOW's Ross Reynolds sat down with author Daniel James Brown, and Tom Ikeda, the head of Densho, a Seattle-based non-profit dedicated to collecting, preserving, and sharing Japanese American history, to discuss their stories.

We Hereby Refuse, by Frank Abe and Tamiko Nimura

Japanese Americans complied when evicted from their homes in World War II -- but many refused to submit to imprisonment in American concentration camps without a fight. Bill Radke speaks to Frank Abe about his new book "We Hereby Refuse: Japanese American Resistance to Wartime Incarceration", and the importance of standing up to injustice.