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caption: RadioActive youth producers (left to right) Simone St. Pierre Nelson, Marian Mohamed, and Antonio Nevarez record the first youth-produced on-air showcase in December 2019 while RadioActive mentor Kyle Norris looks on. 
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RadioActive youth producers (left to right) Simone St. Pierre Nelson, Marian Mohamed, and Antonio Nevarez record the first youth-produced on-air showcase in December 2019 while RadioActive mentor Kyle Norris looks on.
Credit: KUOW Photo/Lila Lakehart

Gen Z teens on balancing growing up with saving the world

In the first-ever youth-produced RadioActive showcase, hosts Antonio Nevarez and Marian Mohamed take you through an hour of stories created entirely by young people. Simone St. Pierre Nelson was the show's producer.

This hour of youth radio features podcasts and stories made by middle schoolers, refugees, and other young people in RadioActive's Community pop-up workshops, as well as by participants in our long-running Intro and Advanced Producer programming.

Many of the stories can be heard in full at the links below, while others are exclusively available in this showcase.

'They're so complacent.' What these youth activists say about grown-ups, produced by Jadenne Radoc Cabahug. Local youth activists Lukas Illa and Grace Lambert talk about their experiences as organizers, and the challenge of being taken seriously by adults.

The racist practice of mispronouncing names. Producers Zuheera Ali, Medha Kumar, and Keya Roy talk about the experience of living in the United States with uncommon names, and whether it's worth it to correct people when they say their names wrong.

Problems of Afghanistan. Reshad Ahmad and Zaheer Yadgari, young people in a RadioActive community workshop with the Coalition for Refugees from Burma, interview each other about life in Afghanistan and what they hope to do for their country in the future.

The line between cultural appropriation and appreciation: 'It's all about power,' produced by Essey Paulos, Michelle Aguilar Ramirez, and Hong Ta. What makes something cultural appropriation? What happens when someone takes from another culture but doesn't intend to offend?

Friendship. Fatxi Ahmed, Asha Ahmed, and Fatuma Noor go to Kent Meridian High School and participated in a community workshop there with the Coalition for Refugees from Burma. They talk about how hard it is to make friends when you're new to the country, and how important it is to have friends.

'We're not supposed to feel unsafe:' back to school in the age of school shootings, produced by Medha Kumar, Jadenne Radoc Cabahug, Lila Shroff, and Braeden Swanson. The shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida sparked a youth movement for change across the nation. In this second of a 2-part series on School Shootings in America, we hear how teens in Seattle have been inspired to take action, and why this event was different than the ones before.

Interview with M. Haynes, 17-year-old political director of March for Our Lives: Washington State [only available in this showcase] Produced by Simone St. Pierre Nelson. Haynes talks about how she got started in activism, and how other young people can be active in their communities.

Who is your best friend and why? Produced in a RadioActive community workshop at Rainier Vista Housing community in partnership with Refugee Women's Alliance, Youth Tutoring Program, and Horn of Africa Services. Middle school students Aisha and Kaltumo asked people about friendship to create this uplifting interview collage.

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These stories were created in KUOW's RadioActive Youth Media Workshops for middle school and high school students.

Find RadioActive on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, and on the RadioActive podcast.

Support for KUOW's RadioActive comes from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Discovery Center.