Elections
State Sen. Reuven Carlyle wants donors' corporate logos to be visible in future campaign ads, like this mock-up.
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State Sen. Reuven Carlyle wants donors' corporate logos to be visible in future campaign ads, like this mock-up.
Credit: KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Full disclosure: Those political mailers are funded by corporations

Your mailbox is likely stuffed with political mailers. 

But do you always know who’s funding those campaigns?

One state senator wants to require big donors’ names and corporate logos on those ads.

If Senator Reuven Carlyle had his way, any political measure on the ballot would include top donors names. He told reporters at a press conference, what the ads would look like, or sound like. “The CEO of Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Dr. Pepper Red Bull will have to… say at the end of a TV ad, ‘I’m the CEO of Coca-Cola and I approve this message.’”

Carlyle’s proposal was prompted by this year’s election where tens of millions of dollars are funding two major ballot initiatives.

One of them, I-1634, is funded by four major soda companies. Altogether they spent more than $20 million to prevent future soda taxes. But that information is not apparent.

“We have in our state, the fine print, which allows companies to hide behind made up names,” said Carlyle.

In the last legislative session, a bill requiring full disclosure co-sponsored by Carlyle, passed the Senate. But it didn’t get a vote in the House.

Carlyle plans to co-sponsor legislation next January.