Kara Bernstine, who is homeless, said she knows the Jungle homeless encampment isn't perfectly safe, but it felt safer than other places in the city.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Yes, I live in the Jungle. And so do 400 other people

Most people think of the Jungle as a scary homeless camp, a no man’s land under the freeway near downtown Seattle.
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This summer, Seattle voters will be asked to make property in the city a little less affordable to make housing for the poorest Seattleites more affordable.

On Monday, Seattle City Council unanimously approved putting a housing levy on the Aug. 2 primary ballot.

Most of the money from Mayor Ed Murray's proposed $290 million levy would go to funding 2,500 low-income apartments. Most of the apartments would be reserved for people making less than 30 percent of the typical Seattle income (about $19,000 for a single person or $24,000 for a family of three).

Few expected this Seattle City Council decision.

The council voted against giving up a street in SODO to make way for a proposed arena. An investor group hoping to bring the NBA to Seattle needed that street to build its arena.

KUOW's Paige Browning reports.

TRANSCRIPT:

The meeting itself resembled a basketball game. People wore jerseys, waved signs, and the crowd cheered at times. In public comment, citizens like Andrew Wergeland-Rammage hoped for a yes vote.

Washington State University cheer squad advice graphic
Facebook Photo/Washington State University Cheer

The University of Washington cheerleading team took some flak for an image they posted on Facebook showing the dos and don’ts for the right tryout look: athletic physique, false lashes, but not too much makeup.

The graphic was intended to give advice to aspiring cheerleaders, but others called the image offensive, exclusionary and ignorant.

Testing for lead in Washington schools is still voluntary seven years after the state passed rules to make it mandatory. That’s because state lawmakers never provided funding to pay for the testing.

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Transit riders around the region have told Sound Transit that the agency's proposal to build 58 miles of light rail over the next 25 years is too slow.

It's been a clear theme in the more than 30,000 comments the agency has received as it gears up for the Sound Transit 3 ballot measure this fall.

Sodo stadiums century link safeco
Flickr Photo/SDOT Photos (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/bZhk8f

A vote in Seattle City Council Monday afternoon could affect basketball fans, the Port of Seattle and traffic in SODO. Council members will decide whether to give up part of Occidental Avenue to allow for a new arena on the site.

Kasich, Cruz or Trump? Which candidate will win later this month?
From left: AP Photos/Evan Vucci, Jacquelyn Martin, and Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Ballots will go out at the end of this week for this year’s presidential primary, and all eyes are on the state’s Republicans. Their vote will decide how the state’s 44 GOP delegates will be apportioned.

With the GOP contest still undecided, the state’s Republicans may have a rare chance to influence the nomination.

For the Greatest Show on Earth, there is no longer an elephant in the room. The 145-year-old Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus held its last show featuring elephants Sunday night, in a move that's being applauded by animal rights activists.

Ringling announced its plan last spring, saying it is sending all its Asian elephants to live on the company's Florida nature reserve. The original plan called for phasing out elephants' role in the circus by 2018. But in January, Ringling's parent company, Feld Entertainment, said it was moving up the timetable.

Nancy Glynn, 27, called it her "NICU diet," but it wasn't about weight loss. It was about financial survival.

When her son, Hunter, was born two months premature, he was 2 pounds, 10 ounces and fighting for his life. Hunter was in the neonatal intensive care unit, or NICU, for more than a month.

CASCADE LOCKS – Klairice Westley stoops at the edge of a spring in the woods above the Oxbow Fish Hatchery.

"Want to get a drink?" she asks.

She dips a cupped hand into the pool of water and takes a sip.

"Oh, that's good water,"she says. "That's the best."

Westley lives nearby in Cascade Locks and also belongs to the Grand Ronde and Warm Springs tribes. She says drinking from Oxbow Springs is more than a tradition among tribal members – it’s a religious rite.

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