arts

Gretchen Rubin at the World Domination Summit 2013 in Portland, Oregon.
Flickr Photo/Chris Guillebeau (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/f4Zory

Gretchen Rubin is a student of human nature. And she’s built a cottage industry around helping people improve their habits and happiness.

“Habits are the invisible architecture of a happy life, and when we change our habits, we change our lives,” she said.

The Record: Wednesday, Feb. 3, Full Show

Feb 3, 2016
microphone
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

A Washington state lawmaker has resigned over allegations he misrepresented his military record. We don't know all the facts yet, but this does come up a lot. How often do people lie about military service and how much does it matter?

Also, Los Angeles has Koreatown, New York has Little Italy. Seattle has the International District, but one of our guests argues that we should also have an Africatown.

And the X-Files are back in Vancouver, B.C., which is not as big a deal as it used to be and we'll show you why.

Listen to the full show above or check out the individual stories:

Vancouver, B.C,
Flickr Photo/Cliff Hellis (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/dxchD5

Bill Radke talks with CBC Radio pop culture columnist Kim Linekin about how The X-Files helped turn Vancouver, B.C. into a thriving hub for TV and film productions.

Advice For Macklemore: Pass The Mic

Feb 3, 2016
Gyasi Ross, activist and attorney, responded to Macklemore's White Privilege II with his own song.
Courtesy of Gyasi Ross

Seattle rapper Macklemore is the latest in a long line of white liberals who chose to play the white savior role and speak for brown-skinned people instead of providing the platform for them to speak for themselves.

Washington state's fourth poet laureate Tod Marshall.
Gonzaga University

If you want to be Washington State’s poet laureate, you have to apply for the job, the same way you’d apply to be a teacher or a bookkeeper.

Nancy Pearl said you'll learn more than you ever thought possible about mules from this week's reading picks.
Flickr Photo/Greg Westfall (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/sS617i

When KUOW listeners are at a loss for what book to read next, help is just a phone call away – as long as the person picking up the phone is "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl.

This week, Pearl and KUOW's Marcie Sillman help a history buff in Seabeck, Washington who loved Bernard DeVoto's "The Journals of Lewis and Clark."

Pearl recommends "The Oregon Trail" by Rinker Buck and another title by DeVoto, "Across the Wide Missouri."

Want Nancy Pearl to help pick your next great read? Call 206.221.3663 and tell us about a book you loved – one you wish you could read again for the first time – and we'll see if Seattle's favorite librarian can guide you to your next book.

The Slants
Courtesy The Slants

In 2007 Portland bassist Simon Tam wanted to start a band that celebrates his Asian heritage, and he wanted a name that captured that pride and at the same time takes back a common racial slur.

Jennifer Hopper in KUOW's green room in 2014.
KUOW Photo/Akiko Oda

Bill Radke speaks with Eli Sanders, Pulitzer-prize winning author of "While The City Slept," about the attack on a hot summer night that changed three Seattle lives forever. On July 19, 2009, Isaiah Kalebu broke into the South Park home that Jennifer Hopper shared with her fiancée Teresa Butz. The man repeatedly stabbed and raped the two women. Butz died on the street in front of her home.

Also, Katy Sewall talks to Hopper about how she feels about having her name forever connected to that attack. For more from Hopper, check out another interview she did with KUOW in 2014. 

Eli Sanders and Jennifer Hopper will join KUOW's Marcie Sillman in conversation at Town Hall Seattle on Wednesday, Feb. 3 at 7:30 pm. More information on the event can be found here.

Carrie Brownstein at The Neptune Theatre.
Courtesy of Jason Tang Photography

Musician, actor and writer Carrie Brownstein co-founded the band Sleater-Kinney and currently stars in the television series Portlandia and Transparent. She spoke with novelist Maria Semple about her new memoir, “Hunger Makes Me A Modern Girl.”

Anna Tatistcheff recorded their conversation at STG’s Neptune Theatre on Nov. 6, 2015.

Please note, this talk contains unedited language of an adult nature.

Web Exclusive: Listen to the full, unedited event below

K
Courtesy The Museum of Fine Arts.

It's a stunner, with a surprise behind it.

And now you can see it.

The very first painting that Frida Kahlo ever sold is now on display.

The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston announced that it is now home to the 20th century Mexican artist’s “Dos Mujeres (Salvadora y Herminia).” The 1928 painting is the only Kahlo painting to be acquired by a museum in New England.

Where a mainstream fashion magazine might do a special "black issue," like Italian Vogue back in 2008, or a black lifestyle magazine might run a queer feature, the perspective of queer black folks tends to occupy occasional outskirts in fashion and lifestyle glossies, never the mainstay.

Mermaid
Flickr Photo/AK Rockefeller (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/20rsa5l

When KUOW listeners are at a loss for what book to read next, help is just a phone call away – as long as the person picking up the phone is "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl.

This week, Pearl and KUOW's Marcie Sillman help a listener in Friday Harbor follow up on Majia Comella's "The Bay of Mermaids."

Pearl recommends Sarah Addison Allen's "Garden Spells" and "City of Bones" by Cassandra Clare, plus a little Alice Hoffman for good measure.

When people had trouble paying the rent in the early 1900s, they might hold a party in their homes, with music and dancing, and sell tickets at the door. Now, a nonprofit group is holding a modern-day version of the rent party to shine a light on the growing lack of affordable housing.

The new parties aren't exactly like the old ones, which were mostly held in Harlem. There's no dancing, food or tickets. But there is music, as was the case recently in Annapolis, Md., where about 20 people gathered in Tom Wall's small apartment to help him, and others like him, pay the rent.

The Record: Monday, Jan. 25, Full Show

Jan 25, 2016
KUOW Photo

We've had legal marijuana for a while -- is it time for pot cafes? Have you seen the crowdsourced mao of Seattle for people with disabilities? And what is Macklemore going for with his new song “White Privilege II” – a nine-minute monument to inner conflict?

Listen to the full show above or check out the individual stories:

Macklemore & Ryan Lewis perform at the Gorge Amphitheatre in George, Washington in 2011.
Flickr Photo/Dave Lichterman (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1JzkR7A

Bill Radke talks with musician and composer Ahamefule J. Oluo, one of several Seattle-based artists who collaborated on the new Macklemore and Ryan Lewis track, "White Privilege II."

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