arts

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about the novel "Vexation Lullaby" by Justin Tussing.

Bank Street Tattoo Company owner and Navy Petty Officer First Class Mike Spittler. Spittler already has a nautical scene with Poseidon the God of the sea tattooed on his arm.
American Homefront/Sophie McKibben

Effective this month, tattoo enthusiasts who serve in the U.S. Navy can ink a lot more of their body.

The Navy's latest policy change is an effort to remain attractive to millennials who may be excluded from serving due to the size of their body artwork.

'Isis' painting by Noah Davis.
Courtesy Frye Art Museum

Maikoiyo Alley-Barnes believes that to be an artist, one must live life to the max.

“I meet people all the time that don’t live full enough lives,” he says. “I’m real adamant about living. If people ask me, I’d be more inclined to say I’m a bon vivant than to tell you I’m an artist.”

Sailing on Puget Sound
Flickr Photo/Eugene Kogan (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/ajF6Am

Olympia novelist Jim Lynch’s new book “Before the Wind” is about a Seattle family that builds, repairs and races a sail boat. They’re not blue-blazer yachtsmen; they’re the working class people who make and maintain the boats for the yachtsmen.

Courtesy of Terry Miles, Pacific Northwest Stories Network

Bill Radke speaks with Terry Miles, executive producer of the podcast Tanis, about chasing the myth of Tanis and why some think it may be hidden near the Puget Sound.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about "Daydreams of Angels," by Heather O'Neill.

Bill Radke speaks with music journalist Charles Cross about the newly released lineup for Bumbershoot 2016. Whether you love or hate this year's lineup, Cross says Seattleites should be thankful for this music festival. 

The "monoculture" has supposedly been dead for at least a decade, but it ain't necessarily so. World-devouring pop music phenomena do still exist, but today that universe is made entirely of Beyoncé — a Michael Jackson/Madonna/Prince figure whom everyone who cares about popular culture is supposed to grapple with and have big thoughts about.

Courtesy of Niki Sherey Keenan

Niki Sherey Keenan’s moments of inspiration arrive when most of us are still in bed.

“There might be a sunrise that only lasts five seconds,” she explains. “It would stick with me all day.”

Sherey Keenan recreates these special moments in her dream-like paintings.

Editor's note: This week, to mark the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare's death, we will be running a series of stories examining the links between food and the Bard.

In Shakespeare's time, England was a hungry and volatile nation.

Portland's Music Community Remembers Prince

Apr 21, 2016

Three years ago, on April 21, 2013, Prince played the Roseland Theater in downtown Portland.

For those in attendance, it was a life changing moment, a musical revelation and a night they would never forget.

Exactly three years later to the day, on April 21, 2016, Prince Rogers Nelson was gone. Prince, one of the most talented musicians the world has ever known, was found dead at his Minneapolis home.

Employees at Ike's Pot Shop in Seattle's Central District sell marijuana products on their opening day, Sept. 30, 2014.
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

When writer David Schmader was approached to write a book about marijuana, he laid down these rules: No cartoon pot leaves, no stoner puns and no forwards by Tommy Chong.

Harriet Tubman, 1911.
Public Domain

Bill Radke speaks with Ijeoma Oluo about her article in The Guardian in which she argues against placing Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill.  She also shares her reaction to the news that Prince passed away Thursday at the age of 57. 

Timothy Egan (with Oscar Wilde) in Galway, Ireland
Courtesy of Timothy Egan

Seven years ago, writer Timothy Egan was on a trip to Helena, Montana. While on a walk with the governor he came across a statue that intrigued him and asked a simple question: “Who is that?” The answer lead Egan on an extended journey leading toward his new book, “The Immortal Irishman.”

Egan, who lives in Seattle, is a New York Times columnist and the author of seven books. He spoke at Town Hall Seattle on March 1. Jennie Cecil Moore recorded his talk.

Armed with a 3-D printer and a computer-guided stonecutter, cultural heritage advocates are taking on the jackhammers of the Islamic State and its destructive ideology.

When Islamic State militants seized the Syrian desert town of Palmyra last May, an orgy of demolition began. Using dynamite, fire, bulldozers and pickaxes, the wrecking crew targeted 2,000-year-old Greco-Roman temples, monuments and stone statues. Palmyra's 20-foot-tall Arch of Triumph, a symbolically important monument, lay in ruins.

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