arts

Author and illustrator Elisha Cooper
Courtesy of Elisha Cooper/Christopher Smith

In his new memoir, “Falling: A Daughter, A Father, and a Journey Back,"  author Elisha Cooper recalls how he and his family faced and survived his daughter Zoe’s cancer.

The act of reflection, some years after the events, is cathartic for Cooper. The result is the chronicle of a life-changing period, marked by terrifying uncertainty and resilience. He tells the story with humor and a palpable sense of awe. 

Lesley Holdcroft, elevator operator at Seattle's historic Smith Tower.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Smith Tower re-opens Thursday in Pioneer Square. It marks an important turnaround for the 1914 landmark Seattle building. 

It was once the tallest building West of the Mississippi. But it left that title behind long ago. You could say the Smith Tower hit rock bottom after the recession when plans to turn it into condos didn’t pan out and banks foreclosed on the famous wedding cake of a building.

KUOW’s Joshua McNichols took a tour of Smith Tower to learn some of its history.

This cartoon by Kevin Siers of The Charlotte Observer, following the police shootings in Dallas, Texas, is part of Suzzallo Library’s Editorial Cartoons exhibit.
Courtesy of Kevin Siers, The Charlotte Observer

Bill Radke speaks with University of Washington librarian Jessica Albano about their political cartoon display. The display at the Suzzallo Library showcases cartoons from across the U.S. concerning 2016 election cycle and other top-of-mind issues.

The Voynich Manuscript is a singular mystery. But thanks to a small publishing house in Spain, the one-of-a-kind text will soon be more like one-in-900.

The 15th-century document is written in an unknown, apparently encrypted language that has defied every code breaker's efforts. It's illustrated with unknown or imaginary plants and never-seen constellations. The only copy is locked away at Yale University to protect the book; scans online are the closest most mortals can get to viewing its pages.

Jean-Baptiste "Toots" Thielemans, the Belgian-American musician who cut a singular path as a jazz harmonica player, died in his sleep Monday in his hometown of Brussels. He was 94.

Finding beauty along Seattle's toxic scar

Aug 22, 2016
Courtesy of Tom Reese

Bill Radke speaks with photographer Tom Reese and journalist Eric Wagner about their book, "Once and Future River: Reclaiming the Duwamish." The three talk about the history of the Duwamish, how it became Seattle's forgotten river and the efforts to clean it up.

Michael W. Davidson at Florida State University | Molecular Expressios.com

Editor's note: This interview contains adult themes, including a discussion of sexual assault.

Amy Schumer is tired of answering a question journalists ask her all the time: Is this a good moment for women in Hollywood?

"It is an amazing moment for every woman," she tells NPR's David Greene, "if you have ovaries and you're in the 90210 ZIP code."

People cool off in Seattle Center's International Fountain.
Flickr Photo/David McSpadden (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/oZ93L4

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle DJ James Whetzel about his fifteen years as the mix master for Seattle Center's International Fountain, how he adjusts the music to the weather and what it's like underneath the fountain.

A conceptual rending of what the Upstream Music Fest will look like.
Courtesy of Upstream Music Fest

Bill Radke speaks with Jeff Vetting, executive director of the Upstream Festival,  about why billionaire Paul Allen is investing in this new music festival coming to Seattle's Pioneer Square in May 2017. 

Shiyogi Kawabata, 88, worked on a wooden chain (below) while interned at Minidoka, a Japanese internment camp in Idaho.
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

At 88, Shiyogi Kawabata remembers the harsh conditions he and his family endured in the Minidoka Relocation Center during World War II.

Ticks. Coyotes. Scorpions. Black widow spiders.

In 1977, Deborah Barsel, a bored assistant registrar at the George Eastman Museum in Rochester, N.Y., decided to try a fun side project. She would create a cookbook made up of recipes and images from famous photographers of the day. She sent letters to various artists and put an ad in the museum's magazine asking for submissions. In return, she received 120 photos, recipes and even a postcard from urban photographer John Gossage saying simply: "I eat out."

Jeremy Pots and Emily Sheil perform in the North Cascades National Park.
Courtesy of Music in the American Wild/Geoff Sheil

Bill Radke speaks with Emlyn Johnson, director of Music in the American Wild, about how nature inspires their musical performances and why they decided to celebrate the National Parks Service's 100th anniversary by touring the parks in Washington state.

Seattle’s Frye Art Museum has named a new director. Joseph Rosa will become the Frye Museum’s new leader this fall.

Rosa currently directs the University of  Michigan Museum of Art, where he has worked since 2010. He replaces outgoing director Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker.

A conceptual rending of what the Upstream Music Fest will look like.
Courtesy of Upstream Music Fest

Bill Radke speaks with music journalist and Seattle native Ann Powers about Paul Allen's newest venture: a three-day music festival and industry conference called Upstream.

Festival organizers say they will "collide music, gaming, tech, media, design, and more to tackle today’s toughest industry challenges and open up opportunities within the new entertainment economy."

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