arts

Seattle's city hall was a mishmash of additions, including a basement where some prisoners were sent and brutally treated, fed a minimal diet of bread and water.
Seattle.gov

Little surprises Knute Berger, writer and local historian, when it comes to Seattle history.

So when he discovered that Seattle had used chain gangs – ball and chain style – into the 1900s, he thought, “Chain gangs? That’s a Southern thing.”

film movie
Flickr Photo/StudioTempura (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Washington Filmworks executive director Amy Lillard about a legislative proposal that would increase the amount of tax incentives for film productions in Washington state.

Edna Daigre, center, teaches a class for older dancers in Seattle's Central Area.
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

Doris Tunney doesn’t even pretend to be offended when you ask how old she is.

“I’m 86,” she says proudly. “I’ll be 87 on March 26.”

Tunney is petite, with cinnamon brown skin, short, curly white hair and perfect posture. Dressed in denim capris and a long-sleeved cotton shirt, this octogenarian is ready to dance.

book read Nancy Pearl
Flickr Photo/Jonathan Cohen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman gets this week's reading recommendation from everyone's favorite librarian, Nancy Pearl. She suggests the latest police procedural from Richard Price (under the pen name Harry Brandt), "The Whites."

Fasten your seat belts, true believers. If you haven't flipped through a comic book in a while, you might be in for quite a surprise come May. The entire Marvel multiverse is collapsing.

Forget about seeing the Wolverine we knew any time soon. And the current Ghost Rider? Before long, his current story line will be gone like, well, a ghost. In the new Marvel universe, coming in May, characters and continuities will be reimagined.

Pianist Arthur Migliazza performs in the KUOW studios on Jan. 30, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ross Reynolds interviews blues and boogie pianist Arthur Migliazza, who then treats a live audience to a performance in the KUOW studios.

Migliazza began playing the piano professionally at the age of 13. His tutors included the blind master New Orleans pianist, Henry Butler. 

Hike, outdoor, A trail marker designating the Pacific Crest Trail.
Flickr Photo/Dan Hurt (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Jack Haskel, Pacific Crest Trail Association's Trail Information Specialist, about the impact that the book and recent movie, "Wild," is having on the PCT.

Dave Wenning

Marcie Sillman speaks with Washington state poet laureate Elizabeth Austen. Over this past year she has visited  24 counties throughout the state teaching writing workshops, giving readings and meeting fellow poets. Austen speaks about her first year as an "ambassador for poetry" and what she plans to do for her second and final year on the job.

When the Oscars are handed out on Sunday, the red carpet, the ceremony, the films and people who are honored, will be all about being seen. But there's a group of actors who will never be seen on screen. They're only heard — and barely.

Loopers are voice actors whose work begins after the show or film is shot and edited. Their job is to record what people in the background of a scene could be saying. Their dialogue is never really heard at full volume — and it's mostly ad-libbed.

Members of the Ardeo Theatre Project outside their chateau near Poitiers, France. 2001
Courtesy Rachel Atkins

The tail end of the 20th century was a heyday for Seattle.

The city's music scene was making international headlines.

Microsoft had spun off a new generation of technology entrepreneurs who helped launch a dot-com frenzy.

And the economy was booming.

parent kid holding hands
Flickr Photo/Jonathan Cohen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with book hugger Nancy Pearl about the reading pick of the week: "If I Fall, If I Die." It is the first novel of British Columbia writer Michael Christie about on-the-job training for one parent-child relationship. 

File photo of Seattle skyline.
Flickr Photo/clappstar (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with The Stranger's David Schmader about the movie version of the bestselling book, "Fifty Shades of Grey." Both the book and the movie are set in downtown Seattle.

Charles Corey of the University of Washington plays the chromelodeon, one of 57 instruments that composer Harry Partch created for his music.
KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

The door to room 5 at the University of Washington School of Music is solid wood, nothing to distinguish it from other classrooms.

But inside this cramped space is a collection of unusual instruments, handcrafted to play one man’s music.

On the edge of Lake Superior, a 60-foot tower of man-made ice came tumbling down last week.

The ice sculpture was part of a public art project commissioned by the city of Superior, Wis., and the man behind the unusual sculpture is determined to make it rise again.

Two weeks ago, the ragged pillar of ice towered above Barker's Island. You could see it from the road driving into Superior.

"I think it's pretty impressive," says resident Alya Pfeil. "At first I thought it was just frozen ice, nothing to it. But it's actually quite impressive."

Flickr Photo/Gexydaf (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Nancy Pearl about the beloved librarian's weekly reading recommendation: a science-fiction novel by Felix Gilman, "The Revolutions."

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