arts

Isolde Raftery/KUOW

Bill Radke speaks with comedian Quincy Jones. In July of 2015, Jones was diagnosed with cancer and given a year to live. He had one wish: to tape an hour long stand-up special. With the help of an appearance on The Ellen Show, HBO aired his special back in May. Now, Jones is performing in his native Seattle on Friday, Sept 23 at the Neptune Theater

Hard corps: The baddest dancers you never heard of

Sep 22, 2016
Pacific Northwest Ballet

Gorgeous photos and gifs of Pacific Northwest Ballet's corps de ballet. 

Bill Radke talks with monologuist Mike Daisey about how Donald Trump has mastered performance to upend politics and hack journalism. It's the subject of his new one-man show, "The Trump Card."

When Olympia was run by (musical) women

Sep 21, 2016
The band Sleater-Kinney is one of the most famous products of the 90s punk scene in Olympia, Washington.
Flickr Photo/peta_azak (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/t3x8LT

Bill Radke speaks with Len Balli about the history of punk music in Olympia. Balli is the curator of a new exhibit at the Washington State History Museum in Tacoma that displays called "A Revolution You Can Dance To." 

Pacific Northwest Ballet's corps de ballet dancers in George Balanchine's 'Nutcracker.'
Courtesy of Pacific Northwest Ballet/Angela Sterling

Rock stars have back up bands.

Most Broadway musicals have a chorus.

The ballet version of these supporting artists is the corps de ballet; "corps" is French for body.

Blackstock surveys his work on the walls of the Washington Athletic Club.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Seattle artist Gregory Blackstock hasn’t had things easy.

For starters, he's autistic. For years he worked as a dishwasher at the Washington Athletic Club. 

Join KUOW at On the Boards!

Sep 19, 2016
Juniper Shuey

Join Marcie Sillman for the second Front Row Center of our 2016-2017 Season at On the Board’s "Clear and Sweet."

Experience a fusion of dance and live vocals created by Seattle-based dance and visual art team zoe | juniper. Inspired by American Shape Note singing, "Clear and Sweet" immerses the audience in physical and visual art, blurring the line between performer and observer.

Come see "Clear and Sweet" on Friday, October 21 at 8:00 pm, then stay afterwards for a conversation moderated by KUOW's Marcie Sillman with Zoe Scofield and Juniper Shuey of zoe | juniper.

Don Buchla believed in the humanity of wires. The modular synth pioneer created an instrument like none other, one that relied on intuition, learning and, most importantly, human touch. He died September 14 after a long battle with cancer at the age of 79.

It was the night of the small-screen giants. And none stood taller at the 2016 Emmys than the HBO juggernauts Game of Thrones and Veep, which won for best drama and comedy series, respectively. The People v. O.J. Simpson also won the Emmy for outstanding limited series.

Game of Thrones and VEEP may have pulled off repeat wins at Sunday's Emmy Awards, but there was also plenty of room for fresh faces in the winner's circle.

If Hari Kondabolu cracks you up, you may actually have his mother to thank — he says she's the one who taught him to be funny. Uma Kondabolu was a doctor in India who "left everything behind," her son explains. "That's difficult, and yet she laughed her way through it."

It was only recently that he began to appreciate that his mom's life outlook was at the root of his own comedy. His dark sense of humor and his ability to transform negative things into positive? "That comes from her," he tells NPR's David Greene.

Every year, libraries around the country observe Banned Books Week, to remind the public that even well known and much loved books can be the targets of censorship. This year, Washington, D.C.'s public library came up with a clever idea to focus attention on the issue: a banned books scavenger hunt.

Labor journalist Sarah Jaffe
Courtesy of Julieta Salgado

When it comes to the future of good jobs and a contented workforce in the United States, the outlook is tenuous at best: workers left in the wake of off-shoring, financial crises and game-changing robotic technology developments all shape market.

Journalist Sarah Jaffe says community movements are a key to better outcomes. “For the people taking part in them it is not a question of left or right, but of the powerless against the powerful.”

Courtesy of Madeline Whitehead

Bill Radke sits down with author Colson Whitehead to talk about his new novel, "The Underground Railroad."

His book explores slavery in the American South and the role of the Underground Railroad in that story. But in a departure from the history we know about the Underground Railroad, in his book the railroad is an actual railroad. 

The building rises — bronze and "brooding," in the words of architect David Adjaye — floating in a sea of white marble and limestone on the sprawling National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Poet Laura Da'
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Elizabeth Austen talks to local poet Laura Da', the author of "Tributaries", about how she uses poetry to tell the story of her ancestors. Her book is the recipient of the American Book Award. 

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