arts

Stock paper
Flickr Photo/Hobvias Sudoneighm (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/Fecq6

Author Mark Kurlansky tells the story of the time he met legendary newsman Walter Cronkite. Cronkite greeted him with the line “I know you. You’re the leading expander of minutiae.”

If you’re only familiar with Kurlansky’s book titles that may seem an apt description. His latest is “Paper: Paging Through History.”

But he begs to differ. He says he’s not trying to find the obscure in minor details. He’s looking for critical keys to history.

Dennis Coleman, artistic director of the Seattle Men's Chorus and Seattle Women's Chorus.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Marcie Sillman talks with Dennis Coleman about his long career with the Seattle Men's Chorus and Seattle Women's Chorus. Coleman is the outgoing artistic director for both choruses. His final performances at the helm are June 24 and 25 at McCaw Hall.

A California jury has ruled that the members of Led Zeppelin did not plagiarize the opening bars of their hit "Stairway to Heaven," a seminal song in rock history.

The estate of Randy Wolfe, the deceased guitarist of the band Spirit, had filed the federal copyright infringement lawsuit in 2014. It argued that guitar intro was stolen from the opening notes of Spirit's song "Taurus," – which came out before Stairway. At the time, Wolfe was performing under the pseudonym Randy California.

The Seattle Chinese Girls Drill Team at the Seafair Parade in 1952. The drill team got started in 1952.
Flicker photo of 2011 Chinatown Parade by Chung Ng, photo courtesy of Ng

Erin Josue was just 2-years-old when her grandmother took her to her first Seattle Chinese Community Girls’ Drill Team practice.

“I started on her back,” Josue says. “I just kept coming after that.”

Two men arrive in a world of infinite forest: "Mud, rain, biting insects and the odor of willows made the first impression of New France. The second was of dark vast forest, inimical wilderness." René Sel and Charles Duquet are indentured French woodsmen, set to work chipping away at the forests of Canada — then called New France.

Dear Sugar Radio is a weekly podcast from member station WBUR. Hosts Steve Almond and Cheryl Strayed offer "radical empathy" and advice on everything from relationships and parenthood to dealing with drug problems or anxiety.

Today the Sugars talk parenting and mental health. In this letter, a new father who struggles with bipolar disorder wonders if his young daughter is in danger of adopting his "self-hating" feelings.


Dear Sugars,

When Finding Nemo came out in 2003, it was Dory, the plucky, forgetful blue fish, who taught us all, in the face of adversity, to "just keep swimming."

Ellen DeGeneres, who voiced Dory, says she was "flattered and honored and awed" to have her legacy tied to such a determined and positive little fish.

Dory came along during a particularly tough time for DeGeneres — "I hadn't worked for three years," she tells NPR's Kelly McEvers.

Jasmine Jackson (left) recommends events in Seattle, Alaina Caldwell (center) recommends restaurants, and Eula Scott Bynoe (right) interviews the people to know about.
Courtesy of 'Hella Black Hella Seattle'

Bill Radke speaks with Eula Scott Bynoe, Alaina Caldwell and Jasmine Jackson, the three women behind the Seattle-centric podcast Hella Black Hella Seattle. The podcast is a short-run summer series all about how people (especially people of color) can get out, have fun, and create community while the weather is warm.

Sebastian Junger speaks at TED Talks Live in November 2015 at Town Hall New York.
Flickr Photo/TED Conference (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/A7DoJU

News of soldiers who struggle on their return home from war is a constant in the United States. Author Sebastian Junger looked for an explanation for this cultural phenomenon, and may have found it in his research into Native American history. His new book is “Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging.”

Dennis Coleman, artistic director of the Seattle Men's Chorus and Seattle Women's Chorus.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Marcie Sillman talks with Dennis Coleman, artistic director of the Seattle Men's Chorus and Seattle Women's Chorus, about the mass shooting in Orlando. Coleman is retiring this year and he talks about how the Orlando shooting is reflected in the music of his final shows at the podium on June 24 and 25.

Author Peggy Orenstein
Courtesy Photo/Michael Todd

Girls want to be hot.

They want to look good – not because they want to feel good, but because they’re thinking about how others are thinking about them.

Seattle pastry chef Kevin Moulder creates magic in his tiny Eastlake kitchen.
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

Some people make art in a sun-filled studio.

Kevin Moulder creates his masterpieces in a hot, noisy kitchen.

Moulder is a pastry chef. For the past decade, he’s turned out hundreds of cakes, each one unique: cube-shaped structures decorated in vibrantly colored layers of thick sugar paste called fondant; traditional round layer cakes iced in graduated shades of blue; even a cougar sculpted in cake.

Nicole Maines along with her twin brother Jonas and parents Kelly and Wayne.
Courtesy of Penguin Random House/Kelly Campbel

Bill Radke speaks with Amy Ellis Nutt about her book, "Becoming Nicole." Radke and Nutt discuss how the journey of transgender teen Nicole Maines has influenced the national conversation around transgender rights. 

Can comedy reform a swing hater?

Jun 14, 2016
Negin Farsad performs at TEDWomen2015, May 29, 2015.
Flickr Photo/TED Conference (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/sRrmMx

Bill Radke speaks with social justice comedian Negin Farsad about how she believes comedy can change people's negative views of Muslims and other minorities. Her new book is "How To Make White People Laugh." 

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