arts

As part of a series called My Big Break, All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

The U.S. Postal Service has nixed a privately-funded campaign to turn a small town post office in central Washington into a major artistic attraction.

Promotional material for the Seattle Art Fair.
Facebook Photo/Seattle Art Fair

Marcie Silman talks to Jen Graves, visual arts writer for The Stranger, about the inaugural Seattle Art Fair and whether or not it will be good for local art and artists.

The Goddess Kring, aka Shannon Nicole Kringen, was a regular on Seattle public access TV.
Courtesy of ChannelingYourself.com

Think back to a time before the Internet, before Netflix … a time when cable TV had a mere 57 channels. It was the 1980s and ’90s, the heyday of public access television, a wild and wooly experiment we haven’t seen the likes of before or since.

Madeline DeFrees in 1967. The poet, formerly a nun, would tuck an envelope and pencil into the deep pockets of her habit to write when she had time.
Lee Nye via MadelineDeFrees.com

Madeline DeFrees published her first poem at the age of 12.

It was called “Sympathy,” written for a Portland newspaper poetry contest.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with book hugger Nancy Pearl about this week’s reading recommendation: artist Sally Mann’s memoir “Hold Still.” Mann is a photographer with an MFA in creative writing. Pearl says that her memoir will delight even people who aren’t aware of her work. 

A photo of Ann Rule in 1976 from her official website. Rule was the author, most famously, of The Stranger Beside Me, about her personal relationship with serial killer Ted Bundy before he was caught.
Leslie Rule/AuthorAnnRule.com

Marcie Sillman talks with The Stranger's Eli Sanders about bestselling true-crime writer Ann Rule, who died on Sunday at age 83. Sanders wrote an in-depth profile about Rule for The Seattle Times.

The smartphone has given us a whole new genre of cultural expression: the selfie.

If you're into selfies, it's safe to say you've probably taken one, and maybe wished you didn't have those dark circles under your eyes.

Now there are plenty of apps out there to fix that.

But whether you think your selfies can be elevated to art may depend on how much effort you are willing to put into them.

A Personal Brand Boost

Macklemore's "Thrift Shop" made Amanda Wilde's list. Here  the Seattle artist performs at the Gorge Amphitheater in George, Washington.
Flickr photo/Dave Lichterman

Washington state is on the edge – the geographical edge of the continental United States and the cutting edge of music.

Hosts Mimansa Dogra and Jack Paradise get postmodern.
KUOW Photo/Lola Garcia

A self-aware postmodern painting finally sees itself as it truly is in this original radio play, "Red on White."

Seattle artist Fay Jones created this mural in the Westlake bus tunnel in the late 1980s.
Metro King County

Even if you don’t know her name, you’ve probably seen artist Fay Jones’ work.

She created one of the giant murals on the walls of Seattle’s underground Westlake Transit Station. It's a 10-foot-high, 35-foot-long fantasia of men, women and fish.

A view from inside a Boeing factory.
Courtesy of Boeing

Ross Reynolds interviews journalist Russ Banham about the history of the Boeing company, which turns 100 this year. Banhan is the author of “Higher: 100 Years of Boeing.”

It begins with the story of how Bill Boeing went from the timber business to boat building to airplanes. Banham also tells the story of how at the end of World War II a Boeing executive found plans for a swept wing jet aircraft while touring a liberated German factory. This led to the Boeing 707, the plane that secured Boeing's pre-eminence in the U.S. airline industry.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with book hugger Nancy Pearl about a pick that's aimed at teens, but great for readers of all ages: "The Game of Love and Death," by Martha Brockenbrough.

Dawn Brown in a trailer for the documentary 'A New High.'
YouTube

Jeannie Yandel talks with Dawn Brown, a participant in Seattle Union Gospel Mission's program that takes a team of homeless people who are also struggling with addiction up Mount Rainier. Brown's experience is chronicled in a new documentary, "A New High."

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