arts

Publishing's big week is almost over. The industry's annual convention, BookExpo America, ends Friday in New York, and on Saturday the publishing world opens its doors to the public with BookCon, where avid readers will get the chance to mix and mingle with their favorite authors.

Artist C. Davida Ingram's exhibition, "Eyes to Dream: A Project Room," is a rumination of what it means to be black and female in America in 2015.
Courtesy of C. Davida Ingram

The smell.

That's the first thing you notice in C. Davida Ingram's exhibition at the Northwest African American Museum.

It smells like the sea: fishy and briny, with a sort of musky undertone. You can trace those aromas, in part, to a white dress that's hanging on the gallery wall. Thousands of tiny fish that look like minnows or sardines are sewn onto the fabric.

In this June 20, 2013, file photo provided by Leica, photographer Mary Ellen Mark attends the Leica Los Angeles Grand Opening in Los Angeles.
Leica/Todd Williamson, via AP File

Marcie Sillman speaks with Seattle photographer Alice Wheeler about the photographer Mary Ellen Mark, who died on Monday at age 75. Some of Mark's best-known work documents the lives of 1980s-era Seattle street youth in a photography series for LIFE magazine and later in a documentary film called "Streetwise."

Maria Bello is famous for her roles on television's ER and in films like Coyote Ugly and A History of Violence, but her new book is about her life off-screen. Whatever ... Love is Love is a memoir about family and relationships that expands on a column Bello wrote in 2013 for The New York Times.

Michelle Cooper's "A Brief History of Montmaray."

Marcie Sillman talks to book hugger Nancy Pearl about "a perfect meld" of history and fiction just in time for summer: "A Brief History of Montmaray," by Michelle Cooper. Pearl likens the book to Dodie Smith's "I Capture the Castle."

Mary Ellen Mark, the influential photographer known mostly for her humanist work, has died. She was 75.

Mark died Monday, a representative said Tuesday. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that she died in New York.

Mark's work appeared in Life, New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair. Her photo essay on runaway children in Seattle became the basis of Streetwise, an Academy Award-nominated film that was directed by her husband, Martin Bell.

It's a warning sign at art museums around the world: "Don't touch the artwork."

But Spain's famous Prado Museum is changing that, with an exhibit where visitors are not only allowed to touch the paintings — they're encouraged to do so.

The Prado has made 3-D copies of some of the most renowned works in its collection — including those by Francisco Goya, Diego Velazquez and El Greco — to allow blind people to feel them.

It's a special exhibit for those who normally can't enjoy paintings.

It's impolite to stare. But when it comes to severely injured soldiers, maybe we don't look enough; or maybe we'd rather not see wounded veterans at all.

Dumi Maraire, the hip hop artist better known as Draze, will be performing at Northwest Folklife Festival this weekend.
Facebook Photo/Draze

Some of the roots of Seattle hip hop go back to Zimbabwe.

In 1968, Dumisani Maraire came to the University of Washington as an artist in residence to share the music of the Shona people. He was supposed to stay a year, but stayed and raised a family here. 

Now his two sons are active in Seattle’s hip hop scene: Tendai is half of Shabazz Palaces and Dumi Jr. is the hip hop artist “Draze.” Music was life for the Maraire family. 

Ross Reynolds interviews Ryan Harvie, co-director of a new documentary called "Bodyslam: Revenge of the Banana."

Between 2003 and 2009 a group called Seattle Semi-Pro Wrestling was packing dive bars in Seattle with gonzo wrestling performances. Characters like Ronald McFondle, Eddie Van Glam and The Banana were cabaret fighters, spoofing wrestling pros. 

Eli and Oliver Abrahamson at home in 2012.
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

Memorial Day weekend in the Seattle area means barbecues, camping trips and the annual Northwest Folklife Festival.

This four-day festival of folk traditions convenes again Friday, May 22, at the Seattle Center. Attendees can experience everything from do-it-yourself drum circles to square dancing to a bevy of string bands.

Three years ago, we introduced audiences to the Oliver and Eli Abrahamson, two boys who got their musical start busking at Folklife. At the time, they and their parents performed together as the Smalltime String Band.

When the final episode came, after weeks of accolades and tributes to his genius, David Letterman made sure he punctured the emotion of the moment with a little old-fashioned, self-deprecating sarcasm.

The iconic sculpture in McCaw Hall, home of the Pacific Northwest Ballet and Seattle Opera.
Flickr Photo/Frank Fujimoto (CC-BY-NC-ND)

A new national survey ranks Seattle fourth in the nation when it comes to the number of nonprofit arts and culture organizations. That's higher than San Francisco or Minneapolis.

Longtime arts administrator Sue Coliton isn't surprised by that news.

Marcie Sillman talks to Nancy Pearl about a new planned trilogy that promises the same thrills and devotion as "Harry Potter." Pearl gives the first book in Edward Carey's series, "Heap House," two thumbs up. 

Jennie Reed rides during qualification for an individual pursuit race in London on Feb. 18, 2012.
Flickr Photo/Marc (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Seattle-area resident Jennie Reed thought that after a world championship and two Olympics, she was ready to end her racing career in track cycling.

But when a fellow racer asked her to be part of the first-ever women's Olympic cycling team pursuit event, Reed decided to answer the call.

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