Children's book author and illustrator Maurice Sendak, points to a 3-year-old fan Marcus Gabrielli as he signed autographs in New York.
AP Photo/Mike Appleton

Did Maurice Sendak, author of "Where The Wild Things Are," talk to kids about his work?

It was 1991, and Sendak had come into the KUOW studios for an interview with Ross Reynolds on “Saturday Afternoon.”  

Hillary Clinton was on NBC's Saturday Night Live during the 2008 campaign and appeared alongside Amy Poehler, her alter ego on the show.

They poked through the facade. Clinton went on as herself, wearing the same pantsuit as Poehler, who feigned awkwardness about sharing the screen with the woman she mocked weekly (though Poehler and Clinton say they are friends in real life).

Last night, Clinton again appeared on SNL — on the season premiere.

Author Walter Mosley and his father in front of their home in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles.

People usually remember as far back as the generation that raises them, says writer Walter Mosley.

Mosley had come into KUOW’s studios to speak with KUOW’s Ross Reynolds. It was 1992, and his third book, White Butterfly, had just been published.

Easy Rawlins, Mosley’s main character, emerged from those memories. Easy was a fixer, a guy who does favors for people.

For more than 10 years, disease had slowly eaten away at He Quangui's lungs, leaving him, for the most part, bedridden.

But He was no smoker — he was a Chinese gold miner. He was stricken with silicosis, a respiratory illness caused by inhaling silica dust. An estimated 6 million Chinese miners suffer from the debilitating disease pneumoconiosis — of which silicosis is one form.

Before he created The Simpson, Matt Groening created the Life in Hell comic series. Among his characters were Akbar and Jeff, whose origins go back to Groening's fifth-grade attempts at mimicking Peanuts.
Matt Groening / Life In Hell

Before The Simpsons, there were crazy rabbits and Akbar and Jeff.

Matt Groening, who created television’s most iconic cartoon family, spoke with Ross Reynolds in the late 1980s on the show Saturday Afternoon.

Such a little bandaid for a big ouch!
Courtesy Bond Huberman

When writer Eula Biss was pregnant, she absorbed some of the fear about vaccines.   

“Fear is almost contagious itself, and so I caught some fears,” she told KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel.

Ross Reynolds interviews novelist Stephanie Clifford about her New York Times best seller “Everybody Rise,” the story of  a 26-year-old from Maryland who tries to fit in with the wealthy New York elite. It's a contemporary take on Edith Wharton's "House of Mirth". 

Clifford  based her book on her experience of culture shock after moving from Seattle to the East Coast. When she’s not writing novels Clifford is a a New York Times reporter covering courts.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks to history and book buff Nancy Pearl about a fresh take on Britain's 19th and early 20th century: "Parallel Lives: Five Victorian Marriages," by Phyllis Rose.

Fisherman in Coos Bay, Oregon where 21 percent of residents live below the poverty level.
Courtesy of MSNBC/Matt Black

Jeannie Yandel talks to photographer Matt Black about his photo series, "The Geography of Poverty," and about how poor Northwest communities compare to impoverished towns across America. Black's photos were published by MSNBC

NASA astronaut Michael Barratt with floating tomato in Zvezda service module of the International Space Station.
Wikipedia Photo/Public Domain

Ross Reynolds interviews Michael Barratt, a Camas, Washington born astronaut who flew on the last Space Shuttle mission, about how real space travel compares to the movie versions. He's already seen the new Matt Damon film "Martian" twice. Barratt also talks about how his upbringing on a farm was good preparation for going into space.

Seattle's Pier 86 grain terminals may be adorned with art some day. Grain silos elsewhere in the world have been a canvas for public art.
Flickr Photo/Bernt Rostad

  You see it everywhere in Seattle.

Hammering Man.

The dance steps on Broadway.

The Fremont Troll.

Jazmyn Scott stands in front of a mural created for MOHAI by SPECSWIZARD who has been making art and beats in Seattle since 1978.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

This week MOHAI opened a new show called The Legacy of Seattle Hip-Hop. The exhibit is not just about the history here, it’s also about how Seattle hip-hop fits into the larger culture.

For Daudi Abe, author of the upcoming book “Emerald Street: A History of Hip-Hop in Seattle 1979-2015,” it all began 36 years ago.

Seattle mystery author J.A. Jance.
KUOW Photo/Michael Clinard

On a damp gray morning, J.A. Jance sits inside the Seattle Mystery Bookshop. Her cheery yellow blazer stands out in all the gloom.

Jance chuckles as she points out a large shelf devoted to her books.

If you read mystery novels, chances are you’ve run across one of them. Jance has published 51 novels, along with novellas and short stories. They’re divided into four distinct series; three are set in Arizona, where Jance grew up.

File photo: diver swimming with dolphins
Flickr Photo/Steve Jurvetson (CC BY 2.0)

Bestselling author Susan Casey was a former competitive swimmer with extensive experience in ocean swimming. So it surprised her when she realized she had never swum with dolphins.

That changed when she unexpectedly encountered a pod of Spinner dolphins during a solo swim off Maui. Casey was so affected by the experience that she spent the next few years researching dolphins around the world. The result is her latest book, “Voices in the Ocean: A Journey into the Wild and Haunting World of Dolphins.”    

"Welfare," by Billy Shire. This denim jacket has metal studs, crystal beads and a call bell on the back. The jacket won the 1974 Levis Denim Art contest. In the background, a photo by Sam Haskins.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Tie-dye. Macrame. Fringes and beads.

If you came of age in the 1960s, you’ll recognize these in the signature look of the era.

Maybe you turned your old jeans into a skirt, or embroidered colorful mandalas onto the back of a faded work shirt. In the 1960s and '70s, clothing was as much about personal expression as it was protection against the elements. But did you know you were creating art?