KUOW News and Information

All Seven Defendants Found Not Guilty In Refuge Occupation Trial

The end of the six-week trial for seven people who took over the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in eastern Oregon can be summed up in two words: not guilty.A 12-person jury found occupation leaders Ammon and Ryan Bundy not guilty Thursday of the government's primary charge: conspiracy to impede federal officers by force, threat or intimidation. Their five co-defendants Jeff Banta, Shawna Cox, David Fry, Kenneth Medenbach and Neil Wampler have all been found not guilty as well.Jurors were...
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Updated: 7:26 a.m. | Posted: 5:51 a.m.

A monthslong protest over the Dakota Access oil pipeline reached its most chaotic pitch yet when hundreds of law enforcement officers moved in to force activists off private property.

Thursday's nearly six-hour operation dramatically escalated the dispute over Native American rights and the project's environmental impact, with officers in riot gear firing bean bags and pepper spray.

• More: Tribe leader calls for peace and prayers • FAQ: The Dakota Access pipeline and protest

After years of negotiations, nations have reached an agreement to establish the world's largest marine sanctuary in Antarctica's Ross Sea.

Twenty-four countries and the European Union reached the unanimous deal at an international meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources in Hobart, Australia on Friday.

On Thursday, Hillary Clinton packaged a major new school policy proposal as an attack on her rival, Donald Trump.

"Donald Trump has made no apologies to the growing list of people that he has attempted to bully since the launch of his hate-filled campaign," read the press release from the Clinton campaign about a new $500 million initiative called "Better than Bullying."

When Katlyn Burbidge's son was 6 years old, he was performing some silly antic typical of a first-grader. But after she snapped a photo and started using her phone, he asked her a serious question: "Are you going to post that to Facebook?"

She laughed and answered, "Yes, I think I will." What he said next stopped her.

"Can you not?"

That's when it dawned on her: She had been posting photos of him online without asking his permission.

The Pacific Northwest is certainly known for its rain, but the amount of rain that has fallen in October is one for the record books in more than a dozen Northwest cities -- and counting.

Brittany Johnson says the Freedom Foundation contacted her by mail to tell her she didn't have to be a member of SEIU. She said it was never clear how the right-wing organization got her information, and she wants her privacy.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

This fall, Washington voters will consider Initiative 1501, a measure to protect seniors, vulnerable adults and their caregivers. What could be controversial about that?

Amy Radil

UPDATE: 5:49 pm. Pierce County Auditor Julie Anderson tells KUOW that she has reached an agreement with the state Democratic Party because of the threat of the lawsuit.

Anderson says her office will acquiesce to the party's demands and is currently in the process of working out the details. Anderson contends the original mailings did not cause confusion among voters but says she reached the agreement to avoid the possible legal action.

'Mail by November 4 (Stamp required)'

Jason Margolis

A decade ago, Marwan Sweedan was performing surgeries in Iraq. At the time, his family was working with coalition forces, and they became targets.

“My dad got captured, kidnapped, tortured and killed,” says Sweedan.

He says doctors were also being marked, so he applied for refugee status and was later relocated to San Jose, California.

“Being a refugee is not something you plan for, you don’t wake up in the morning and go, ‘I’m going to be a refugee today.’ No, it just happened,” says the 37-year-old Sweedan. 

UW Professor Megan Ming Francis at Kane Hall on October 12, 2016.`
Courtesy of Emile Pitre

As we come to the end of a very long presidential election cycle, what can we do to remedy our legacy of racial injustice and move forward? University of Washington professor Megan Ming Francis searches for answers to that question in her talk “Race and Violence in American Politics.”

Adam Crapser was brought to the United States when he was 3, to start a new life — new parents, new culture, new country.

But his adoptive parents didn't complete his citizenship papers. Then they abandoned him to the foster care system.

And now, as a 41-year-old father of four, he's being deported. Despite his appeals for help, he has been ordered to be sent back to South Korea, a country The Associated Press describes as "completely alien to him."

His predicament is the result of parental failings, a criminal past and acts of Congress.