KUOW News and Information
Growth makes driving Seattle streets crazy - in front of schools, on narrow streets in old neighborhoods, and 59th St. and 22nd Ave NW  where this crazy thing went down. Our audience's question, by a landslide: where are the stop signs to restore order?
KUOW/Megan Farmer

Stop signs aren't all they're cracked up to be, Seattle

As traffic has worsened in the Seattle area, drivers have taken to side streets to beat the brake lights. This prompted one of our most popular Local Wonder questions: Why doesn’t Seattle have more stop signs?

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For more than nine months, Twitter and Facebook have tried to dodge the intense public scrutiny involved with the investigation into Russian interference in last year's presidential election.

Now they're in the spotlight.

Congressional investigators are digging in on Russia's use of Facebook, Twitter and other social media companies to try to influence the 2016 campaign.

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle has a shortage of housing. But all over town, houses stand vacant. Either they’re in foreclosure, or they’re waiting to be torn down for development. Some people think vacant homes are an underused resource.

One man steals them.


On Wednesday we aired an interview with a man who wore a Nazi armband in Seattle. According to people observing him on the bus and then downtown, this man harassed black people — by yelling and throwing bananas at them. 


An Alaskan Copper Works employee walks in the  warehouse on Friday, September 8, 2017, in front of a mural painted by artists Blaine Fontana, Sneke, Hews and APaul, along the Sodo Track, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The second summer of painting is complete for the Sodo Track mural project, with 26 artists painting on 14 properties.

The project, when complete after next summer, will consist of over 50 artists from all over the world, with painted murals relating to one common theme – motion.

Dr. Jonathan Kanter, associate psychology professor at the University of Washington
KUOW/Megan Farmer

Racism takes many forms — it could be a white supremacist rally or a racial slur — but more subtle forms, called microaggressions, happen every day.

Dr. Jonathan Kanter wanted to learn more about microaggressions from a white person's point of view. The associate psychology professor and his research team at the University of Washington found that people who are more likely to make subtle racist statements are also more racist in other ways.

He told KUOW's Emily Fox that the researchers began by asking black students what they thought were microaggressive behavior.


Courtesy of Nation Books

Who are the most dangerous people in America? According to author John Nichols, the answer to that question includes the following: Betsy DeVos, Scott Pruitt, Stephen Miller, Steve Bannon, Jeff Sessions, Elaine Chao, Kris Kobach and Rex Tillerson.

The list goes on to include over 40 members of President Donald Trump’s inner circle.

Attack ad targetting Democrat and Washington State Senate candidate Manka Dingra
YouTube Screenshot

The political attack ad starts with the image of a dirty heroin needle. 

"Heroin destroys lives and threatens our community," the narrator says. “Now Seattle politicians wants safe injection sites around King County.” 


Thick brows were not invented by your favorite Instagram star

23 hours ago
KUOW PHOTO/ZEYTUN AHMED

What’s up with eyebrows?

Eyebrows take up such a small part of our bodies but hold a special place in our hearts. They also make up a multimillion dollar industry.

Updated at 11 p.m. ET

Puerto Rico is trying to start the process of recovering from Hurricane Maria — and it's doing so after the powerful storm blew homes apart, filled roads with water and tore at its infrastructure. Flash floods are persisting, and the island has no electricity service.

"We are without power, the whole island is without power," Jenniffer González-Colón, Puerto Rico's resident commissioner — its representative in Congress — told Morning Edition on Thursday. González-Colón spoke from Carolina, near San Juan.

In Cambridge, Mass., a woman named Kristin sits down on a stone bench to talk about a common but rarely discussed injury that's starting to grow along with the opioid epidemic: rape.

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