Author Lindy West lives in Seattle.
Photo by Jenny Jimenez / http://photojj.com

Lindy West: From 'broken thin person' to badass lady knight

Jeannie Yandel talks to Seattle writer Lindy West about her new book, "Shrill: Notes From A Loud Woman." In it West talks about how she found her voice, reclaimed the word "fat" and began fighting misogyny on the internet.
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Sound Transit

Everett could get light rail in 20 years instead of 25 under a new plan discussed by the Sound Transit board Thursday afternoon.

Light rail would reach Ballard in 19 years instead of 22.

The plan would also shave four years off the long waits for service in south King County and on the Eastside.

"We heard loud and clear from everybody that they want more, faster,” Snohomish County Executive and Sound Transit board member Dave Somers said. “That’s as true in the north part of the Sound Transit district as it is in others."

Microphone in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

A group hoping to buy the public radio station KPLU from Pacific Lutheran University announced Thursday that it’s raised the money to do so.

General manager Joey Cohn delivered the news on-air with supporters cheering in the background. Reaching the $7 million goal paves the way for the group Friends of 88.5 FM to enter negotiations with PLU. If they reach a sale agreement, the previous offer from KUOW will be terminated.

Lisa Hallett holding a photo of her husband John
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Mile one: “Oh my God, the babies didn’t stop crying for the last hour and a half.”

Mile two: “I need to buy diapers, what am I going to make for dinner, there’s baby food stuck in the carpet, what am I going to do?”

Mile three and four: “All of a sudden the business and the high energy of that day to day life with young children, it starts to quiet down.”

Mile five: “It’s just quiet, there’s nothing.”

Mile six: “Oh shit, my husband died.”

Sen. Reuven Carlyle was one of the plaintiffs in the case against I-1366, which was sponsored by Tim Eyman.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

The latest tax-limiting initiative approved by Washington voters will not go into effect. Thursday, the Washington State Supreme Court ruled it unconstitutional. Justices said the measure violated the requirement that initiatives be limited to a single subject.

But a poll shows voters still support the crux of the initiative.

President Obama came into office with a dream of a world without nuclear weapons, and he's sure to touch on this theme Friday when he becomes the first sitting U.S. president to visit Hiroshima, site of the world's first atomic bombing.

Yet Obama also has put the U.S. on course to spend around $1 trillion on upgrading its nuclear arsenal over the next three decades, critics say.

Everything about nuclear weapons is extreme: the implications of their use, the costs involved, and the strategic and political paradoxes they create.

Nokia Lumia Windows phone. microsoft
Flickr Photo/Vernon Chan (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/bWZ4L4

Kim Malcolm talks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about why Microsoft is scaling back its smartphone business and laying off 1,850 employees.

Journalist Sonia Shah at her 2013 TED talk in Edinburgh, Scotland.
Flickr Photo/Ted Conference (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/eMH3af

In a 2006 study, 90 percent of epidemiologists predicted a pandemic would kill 165 million people sometime in the next two generations.

Research published this year confirms that threat, and suggests the impacts would be greater than those caused by world war or financial crises. The study concluded that “leaders at all levels have not been giving these threats anything close to the priority they demand.”

The U.S. nuclear weapons system still runs on a 1970s-era computing system that uses 8-inch floppy disks, according to a newly released report from the Government Accountability Office.

That's right. It relies on memory storage that hasn't been commonly used since the 1980s and a computing system that looks like this:

Jonathan Tong talks to Nicole Barthel about signing a petition to put Initiative 1464 on the November ballot. She signed.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

If you want to get an initiative on the ballot in Washington state you need a lot of signatures: nearly a quarter million valid ones from registered voters.

And typically, that's going to cost you around a million bucks. If you want to do it cheaper you need people like Jonathan Tong.

Six-year-old Akash Vukoti has won our hearts — if not the Scripps National Spelling Bee.

He was the youngest of the 285 contenders in this year's competition, and even though he misspelled "bacteriolytic" in Round 3, he will not be forgotten.

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