Marchers demonstrate on Tuesday, Nov. 25,  in response to the lack of indictment of Darren Wilson, a St. Louis police officer who shot Michael Brown in August.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Is Seattle Any Different Than Ferguson?

“Hands up, don’t shoot,” protesters chanted, their hands up as they streamed down Seattle streets on Monday night and Tuesday. “Black lives matter.” They were protesting a Missouri grand jury’s decision to not indict a police officer in the fatal shooting of black teenager Michael Brown. As they protested, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray held a news conference, saying the city is committed to the goals of racial and social justice. "We are failing our young African-American men," he said.
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What does 'Two Indias' mean to you?

Robot Milkers Bring New Future to Washington Dairy Farmers

1 hour ago
Sarah Eden Wallace

If anyone should be a traditional farmer, it would be Alan Mesman. His family has been farming for six generations near La Conner. But last year, Mesman became the second of six farmers in Washington state who are trying a new tool that’s helped them cut labor costs and reduce the workload.

Robots.

Federal land managers are rescinding a permit that would have allowed a competition to hunt wolves and coyotes in Idaho.

King County, Washington, is more than 30 percent non-white. But juries in the state’s most populous county often don’t reflect that diversity.

Several Northwest Christmas tree growers are trying to push containers full of evergreens through the Northwest’s delayed seaports.

In a growing number of Northwest prisons, inmates are rearing endangered plants, butterflies, turtles and frogs for release in the wild.

Wikimedia Commons

Ross Reynolds talks with Jon Talton, economics columnist for the Seattle Times, about the legacy of the Battle in Seattle.

Facebook Photo/Fight Fistula

Ross Reynolds interviews Carolyn Anderman, director of international programs for One By One, a Seattle-based group helping women in Africa recover from a devastating birth complication called obstetric fistula.  Affected women are often shunned in their communities for a condition that can be fixed with a $500 operation.

The Eastside Dabbles With Affordable Housing

Nov 24, 2014
Redmond barber Young Choi discusses the changing face of Redmond with client Kurt Link.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle has struggled to provide affordable housing, and now suburbs are grappling with the same problem. Cities on the Eastside have been updating zoning laws to encourage more affordable housing. But critics say those cities should press developers for more.

Hill’s Barber Shop has been serving people in Redmond for more than 40 years. Last year, Young Choi, an immigrant from South Korea, bought the business.

There's a project in the neighborhood of Harlem in New York that has a through-the-looking-glass quality. An organization called City Health Works is trying to bring an African model of health care delivery to the United States. Usually it works the other way around.

If City Health Works' approach is successful, it could help change the way chronic diseases are managed in poverty-stricken communities, where people suffer disproportionately from HIV/AIDS, obesity and diabetes.

Wencke Petersen came to Liberia in late August to do what she normally does for Doctors Without Borders in hotspots all over the world — manage supplies.

But the supplies she was meant to organize hadn't arrived yet. So she was asked to help with another job: standing at the main gate of the walled-in compound, turning people away when the unit was full.

For five weeks, she gave people the bad news.

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