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Week In Review: Live from Bothell!

Who will be Seattle's next police chief? Interim chief Carmen Best is back in the running after former Pittsburgh Police Chief Cameron McLay dropped out of the race. And how dangerous is the City of Seattle really? Crime statistics and people’s perceptions tell two different stories.

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Author Robin DiAngelo
Courtesy of Beacon Press

The term “white fragility” was coined by the Seattle-based educator and author Robin DiAngelo.

She defines it as “a state in which even a minimum amount of racial stress becomes intolerable, triggering a range of defensive moves. These moves include the outward display of emotions such as anger, fear and guilt, and behaviors such as argumentation, silence and leaving the stress-inducing situation.”

Yolany Padilla hugs her 6-year-old son Jelsin after being reunited on Saturday, July 14, 2018, at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Tap or click on the first image to see more.
KUOW photo/Megan Farmer

A mother and child from Honduras, forced apart for nearly two months, are the first family of asylum seekers to be reunited in the Northwest.

Across the country, families that U.S. immigration officials had separated at the U.S.-Mexico border are beginning to be reunited.

The engineer operating the doomed Amtrak 501 train traveling from Seattle to Portland on Dec. 18 last year told investigators the train had a different control panel and displays than what he was used to.

The morning of the trip, the engineer planned to get up front, touch the dials and nobs to refamiliarize himself with the train.

From the time he sat down in the seat to the time he moved the throttle to pull out of the station, he had just 60 seconds to review the controls before it was time to leave.

It took a long time for Andrea Valobra to realize something basic about her culture. She grew up knowing that women were expected to do certain duties that men didn’t have to do, like cleaning and cooking. But she didn’t understand the full extent of the machismo  culture until she was in her teens.

Her first boyfriend raped her. Another hit and choked her.

She says her family explained it away.

"'He likes you, so he will rape you,'" she says. "'He loves you too much and that is why he has to control your phone.'"

The Federal Emergency Management Agency failed to properly prepare for last year's hurricane season and was unable to provide adequate support to hurricane victims in Puerto Rico and other areas, an internal report released by the agency concluded.

Yolany Padilla, an asylum seeker separated from her 6-year-old son as part of the Trump Administration's 'zero tolerance' policy, wipes her face as she sits at a news conference Wednesday, July 11, 2018, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Yolany Padilla and her six-year-old son, Jelsin, crossed the border into Texas in May after fleeing Honduras, one of the world's most violent nations. But after turning themselves in to immigration officials and being detained separately, Padilla hasn't seen her son in two months, she told reporters in Seattle on Wednesday. 


Alone in a Border Patrol detention facility, separated from her mother, 6-year-old Alison Jimena Valencia Madrid knew what she had to do.

She had to persuade somebody — anybody — to call her aunt. She knew the number by heart, she said, rattling it off as other migrant children around her cried. Her pleas were captured on audio covertly recorded inside the facility, and published on June 18 by a journalist at ProPublica.

Now, a month and two days after their separation, Jimena and her mother have been reunited at an airport in Houston.

A major change that aims to keep more weapons out of the wrong hands is in the works for the FBI's gun background check process.

Examiners will be given access to a large, previously untapped database of more than 400 million records as they determine when gun purchases can go through nationwide. But for the survivors and victims' families of the 2015 church massacre in Charleston, S.C., the change did not come soon enough.

Johnson & Johnson has been ordered to pay nearly $4.7 billion in damages to 22 women and their families who say asbestos found in the company's talcum powder contributed to their ovarian cancer.

The St. Louis Circuit Court jury awarded $4.14 billion in punitive damages and $550 million in compensatory damages to the plaintiffs, who said the company failed to warn about the cancer risks.

Federal lawmakers are making a move to change the Endangered Species Act.  On Thursday, members of the U.S. House announced legislation they say will “modernize” one of the country’s seminal environmental laws, originally passed in 1973.

Members of the House Western Caucus say the nine pieces of legislation are designed to streamline the administration of the Endangered Species Act, provide more local control and protect property rights.

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