Week In Review

Friday, 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. and 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. on KUOW

KUOW's Bill Radke and his guests make sense of the week's news.

Add your two cents: Leave a voicemail at (206) 685-2526; Tweet using #KUOWwir or post to KUOW's Facebook page. Please note that comments may be shared on air. 

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'Week in Review' panel Sydney Brownstone, C.R. Douglas, Brier Dudley and Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Did Governor Jay Inslee and Bill Bryant change any minds during this week's gubernatorial debate? What are the arguments for and against spending $54 billion on Sound Transit 3? And this week, Seattle teachers, students and parents wore Black Lives Matter shirts to class - what did we learn? Finally, should presidential candidates be doing stand-up comedy?

'Week in Review' panel Erica C. Barnett, Bill Radke and Jonathan Martin.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

How will Donald Trump's campaign troubles affect down-ballot Republicans in Washington? Should Seattle allow camping on public land? What are the arguments for and against extreme risk protection orders? Do Seattle's hotel workers need more protections? And is Seattle about to get walloped by the storm of the century?

'Week in Review' panel Josh Feit, Sarah Stuteville, Joni Balter and Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Are liberal lobbyists writing Seattle's laws? Should Washington put a carbon tax on fossil fuels? And what can Vancouver, B.C. teach Seattle about safe injection sites for drug users?

We'll talk about these stories and more on KUOW's Week in Review. Listen to the live discussion Fridays at noon and follow the online discussion @KUOW and #KUOWwir. 

This week we're debating debate winners and losers

Sep 30, 2016
Week in Review guest host C.R. Douglas.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

How did the first presidential debate play here in Washington? What did we learn from the second debate between Governor Jay Inslee and challenger Bill Bryant? And the Barefoot Bandit is out of prison and has a new job … working for his lawyer?

KUOW photo/Bond Huberman

After last week’s announcement by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray to put the plans for the new North Precinct building on hold, protesters interrupted a City Council meeting. What new issues are they raising with the city?

From left, Zaki Hamid, Eli Sanders, Ijeoma Oluo and Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray has announced that the plans for the new North Precinct building will be put on hold. He says the city needs to consider the cost of the building and impact it will have on communities of color. What should happen as the city re-draws the plan?                

Sound board studio
KUOW Photo

How should Seattle use millions of dollars to end homelessness in the city? According to two new reports, it should redirect resources from transitional housing to more permanent housing programs. How will the city tackle these recommendations?

Meanwhile, Seattle City Council is considering a controversial ordinance that would change how the city conducts homeless encampment evictions. What is the conversation around these evictions really about?               

Sound board studio
KUOW Photo

Donald Trump visited Washington, Mexico and Arizona this week where he delivered a speech on immigration. What effect does his anti-immigration, anti-refugee rhetoric have on minority groups living in this country?             

From left: Eli Sanders, Joni Balter, Rob McKenna and Bill Radke
KUOW Photo/Amina Al-Sadi

This week we learned from the Seattle Times that Sound Transit has gone over budget on a few of their transportation projects: 86 percent over budget to be exact. How does that factor into a voter's decision to approve or deny the Sound Transit 3 plan on the ballots this November?

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray has plans for a new North Seattle police precinct. At $149 million, the building would be one of the most expensive police precincts in the country. The plan has sparked protests and pushback from a community that believes it’s an overpriced military-like bunker. Given that Seattle Police Department is under federal investigation for excessive use of force and bias, is this bad city planning?

From left, Sydney Brownstone, Bill Radke, Ijeoma Oluo and Jonathan Martin.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Seattle City Council passed a law that would prevent landlords from discriminating against potential tenants. It is another step towards preventing inequity. But can the city fix the larger issue of affordability?

week in review radke barnett ross finkbeiner
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

A few Washington state voters cast their ballots in the August primary this week. They voted for a guy who wasn’t running, a conservative talk show host and lots of progressives. What are other takeaways from the first 2016 election results?

week in review radke joni zaki rob
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

History was made at the Democratic National Convention this week when Hillary Clinton became the first woman to receive a presidential nomination from a major party in the United States. We’ll talk about the convention, Hillary’s moment, and party unity. What is party unity, anyway? And why does it matter? 

Ross Reynolds, host, Knute Berger and Erica C. Barnett, both writers and Ron Sims, former King County executive.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Donald Trump officially became the Republican Party’s presidential nominee this week. We’ll recap the Republican National Convention and discuss comments made by Republican state party chair Susan Hutchison.

Jonathan Martin, Gyasi Ross, Bill Radke and Lorena Gonzalez made up our Week In Review panel today.
KUOW/Bond Huberman

This week, Ron Smith, the leader of Seattle’s Police Officers’ Guild, resigned. His resignation came after the fallout from a comment he posted to Facebook that read, “The hatred of law enforcement by a minority movement is disgusting … #Weshallovercome.”

However, according to Smith, his resignation has more to do with his approach to police reforms. So what does the city need to do next to keep police reform moving forward under new leadership?