The Record

Monday - Friday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 5 p.m. the day that they air.

Sound of the Day: What interesting sound do you hear throughout the day? Record 30 seconds and send it to us, along with the story behind it. Email it to record@kuow.org with “Sound of the Day” in the subject line.

Ways To Connect

food delivery
Flickr Photo/Mark Turnauckas (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Todd Bishop of Geekwire about their investigation into the practices of the online restaurant delivery service OrderAhead. 

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about new mental health policies and how the state will pay for them. 

The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 as seen from the east.
Flickr Photo/Washington DNR (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Carolyn Driedger, a hydrologist and outreach coordinator for the U.S. Geological Survey, about what volcanologists have learned since Mount St. Helen's erupted 35 years ago and what other risks we face from Northwest volcanos.

Jennie Reed rides during qualification for an individual pursuit race in London on Feb. 18, 2012.
Flickr Photo/Marc (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Seattle-area resident Jennie Reed thought that after a world championship and two Olympics, she was ready to end her racing career in track cycling.

But when a fellow racer asked her to be part of the first-ever women's Olympic cycling team pursuit event, Reed decided to answer the call.

Reid Blackburn, 27, was a photographer at The Columbian newspaper in Vancouver, Washington. He was killed in the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens.
National Press Photographers Foundation

Fay Blackburn of Vancouver, Washington, remembers what it was like when the world turned its attention to the eruption of Mount St. Helens 35 years ago.

Blackburn worked at The Columbian newspaper in Vancouver at the time. Her husband, Reid Blackburn, worked there too, as a staff photographer. He was camping on the mountain taking photos the day it erupted.

Studhorse is the name of this Methow Valley home in Central Washington state. Here, compact living pavilions surround outdoor living spaces.
Courtesy Benjamin Benschneider/Olson Kundig Architects / Olson Kundig Architects

Marcie Sillman speaks with Tom Kundig, owner and principal of Olson Kundig Architects, about how the landscape and culture of the Northwest influenced his newest award-winning building, and how Northwest architecture reflects our changing culture.

Protesters hold signs around a table populated by UW Regents.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Ross Reynolds talks to Taylor Kuykendall, a coal reporter for SNL Energy, about the University of Washington's decision to divest from thermal coal.  

Flickr photo/Jason Walsh (CC BY 2.0)

    

David Hyde talks to seafood economics expert Gunnar Knapp about why Copper River salmon is so expensive.  

This undated handout photo provided by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office shows the StingRay II, manufactured by Harris Corporation, of Melbourne, Fla., a cellular site simulator used for surveillance purposes.
U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Ross Reynolds speaks with Nate Wessler, staff attorney with the ACLU's Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project, about how a new law on the books in Washington will protect residents from a powerful surveillance devices known as Stingrays.

Ross Reynolds talks to Porter Erisman, a former vice president at Alibaba -- the biggest e-commerce site on the Web -- about his new book, "Alibaba's World: How A Remarkable Chinese Company is Changing the Face of Global Business."

A cyclist rolls down University Way Northeast in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Ross Reynolds speaks with Cathy Tuttle, executive director of Seattle Neighborhood Greenways, about what a "sharrow" is, how it helped knock Seattle off the top-10 list of most bikeable cities in America and why she thinks that's a very "healthy" change.

Woman and soldier watching sun set behind Minidoka watchtower in Idaho, 1944.
Flickr Photo/IMLS Digital Collections and Content (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to author and historian  Richard Reeves about his new book, "Infamy: The Shocking Story Of The Japanese Internment In World War II."

Meditators at Seattle's Frye Art Museum during a recent weekly session.
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

Five years ago, Frye Art Museum senior deputy director Jill Rullkoetter was casting about for the perfect public program to accompany an art exhibit called "Seance" which featured the work of German artist Albert Von Keller.

"He depicted images of women in seances, and kind of having these out of body experiences," Rulkoetter explains.

She wanted to create some kind of participatory event that would bring museum-goers into the spirit of this artist's work.

Housing in the Yesler Terrace area.
KUOW Photo/Dominic Black

Ross Reynolds speaks with Rachel Garshick Kleit, affiliate professor of public affairs at the University of Washington, about the Seattle Housing Authority's stated commitment to one-for-one replacement of all affordable housing units lost to revitalization.

New Seattle Co-op Is All About Beer

May 14, 2015
Flying Bike Cooperative hopes to open their doors late June.
Courtesy of Erinn Hale

Kim Malcolm talks with Kevin Forhan, head brewer of Seattle's first cooperative brewery, Flying Bike, about making beer with over 1,000 bosses. 

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