The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

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Dr. Daudi Abe, professor and historian, at the 'Legacy of Seattle Hip-Hop' exhibit at MOHAI, Sept. 2015.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

Washington state has one of the toughest laws for convicting police officers who kill civilians, but that wasn't always the case.

Seattle-based historian Dr. Daudi Abe shared the story of Berry Lawson, a 27-year-old African-American waiter who lived at the Mount Fuji Hotel, downtown, in 1938.


Ashley Hempelmann says a safe space to use drugs could've helped her.
KUOW Photo/Kim Malcolm

Kim Malcolm talks with Patricia Sully, coordinator for VOCAL-WA, about why she's advocating for supervised consumption sites for drug users in King County. She says that drug consumption is already happening in your backyard and that these sites aren't meant to encourage drug use, but support people along a continuum of care. 

Former King County Executive Ron Sims speaks at a news conference where he announced that President Barack Obama would nominate him to be deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Monday, Feb. 2, 2009, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

I have been stopped eight times by the Seattle Police Department. I wasn't speeding nor did I have an issue with my car.

Four stops occurred in my neighborhood: two on Beacon Hill and one near the intersection of Rainier Avenue and Martin Luther King Way. I was never ticketed but always asked, “Do you live in this neighborhood” or “Where are you going?”

The Record: Thursday, July 14th, Full Show

Jul 14, 2016
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Seattle city council is thinking about new rules to help part-time workers get more predictable schedules. Could a new app out of Seattle be part of the solution? KUOW's investigative reporter John Ryan takes a look at the money behind the flood of initiatives on this November's ballot. And we'll meet a new pastor trying to open up an old, and potentially very uncomfortable conversation with his congregation. That, and much more, on today's Record.

Pastor Drew Yoos is tired of white Christian congregations perpetuating systemic racism.
Flickr Photo/Mars Hill Church (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Drew Yoos is tired of hearing this:

“We’re all a gift from god.”
“Skin color doesn’t matter.”
“Diversity is a gift.”

He’s a pastor in the Bothell-Mill Creek area who believes that many white Christian churches are complicit in perpetuating racism.


A new Seattle-based app helps part-time workers swap shifts.
Brie Ripley

Kim Malcolm speaks with Bloomberg News Tech Reporter Dina Bass about a new Seattle-based app, Shyft. The app is designed to help part-time shift workers trade schedules with other workers. 


KUOW Photo

The head of the Seattle Police Officer’s Guild has resigned after saying something on Facebook in the heat of the moment. What was so bad about what he said and why does the police union leader matter?

Your child's school may not be safe in an earthquake. If you were in Oregon, California or British Columbia thinks might be different. We’ll show you why.

And maybe you should take up running. I'm not going to take up running, but maybe other people should. You might be convinced by a distance-running, comic-drawing storyteller. He says his face is a garbage disposal.

The Blerch is a sort of life-coach spirit animal coaxing comic artist Matthew Inman to lace up and go running.
The Oatmeal/Matthew Inman (http://theoatmeal.com/comics/running)

Our daily lives can sometimes feel like an overwhelming monster. Some days we beat the monster and we feel on top of the world. Other days, we don't.

Local comic artist and creator of The Oatmeal, Matthew Inman, conjured up what his monster looks like: a creature called “The Blerch” that's constantly chasing after him. The Blerch is a key character in his book, “The Terrible and Wonderful Reasons Why I Run Long Distances."


Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a singer who changed the lyrics to the Canadian national anthem to say 'All Lives Matter' at the Major League Baseball All-Star game Tuesday. 


Preschoolers huddle beneath a table at Green Tree Early Learning Center in Seattle, which conducts monthly earthquake drills.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times reporter Sandi Doughton about why so many Washington state schools are unprepared for a major earthquake.


Seattle Police Department patch.
Facebook Photo/Seattle Police Officers Guild

Bill Radke speaks with The Stranger reporter Ansel Herz about the resignation of the Seattle Police Officers Guild president Ron Smith after a controversial Facebook post about the killing of five police officers in Dallas. 


Flickr Photo/scottlum (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/rgPsj9
Flickr Photo/scottlum (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/rgPsj9

Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, Laquan McDonald, Walter Scott. 

"These are all shootings that could've been prevented," said Norm Stamper, former chief of the Seattle Police Department.
 

Bill Radke talks with comedian Jessi Klein about her memoir, "You'll Grow Out Of It," and why we love tomboys but don't quite know what to do with tom-men.

The Record: Monday, July 11th, Full Show

Jul 11, 2016
studio
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Coming out of last week's killings by police and of police we give you some ideas of things  you can do about violence and injustice.

Also, a Seattle biotech company suffered a major blow when three people died in a clinical trial and the FDA stopped the trial. How big a setback is this for Juno Therapeutics and the treatment of cancer? 

And finally, comedian Jessi Klein will tell you why we love tomboys but not tommen.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Bill Radke speaks with Luke Timmerman about what went wrong during Seattle-based Juno Therapeutics' clinical trial of an immunotherapy treatment for leukemia and what it might mean for the company.

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