The Record

Monday - Friday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 5 p.m. the day that they air.

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The New Mayor Of Aberdeen Is Younger Than Nirvana

Nov 19, 2015
'Come as you are' to Aberdeen politics, no matter your age.
Flickr Photo/Brandy (CC BY ND 2.0)/

Todd Mundt talks to Erik Larson, 23 years old and the mayor-elect of Aberdeen, about how he beat out a former City Council member for the job. 

Bill Radke talks to Melanie McFarland, local writer and TV critic, about a time a stranger touched her hair at a bus stop and why incidents like this are a microaggression. 

Bernie Sanders, senator from Vermont and presidential candidate, and Councilmember Kshama Sawant at a rally held at Westlake Center this fall.
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

Bill Radke talks to John Nichols, political reporter for The Nation, about presidential candidate Bernie Sanders' speech defining Democratic Socialism and what it means for socialist candidates, including Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant.

The VICIS helmet is seen in a testing apparatus.
Courtesy of VICIS

Bill Radke talks with neurosurgeon Dr. Samuel Browd about his company's anti-concussion football helmet. Browd is a neurosurgeon at Seattle Children's Hospital and co-founder of the company Vicis.

A genetically engineered Atlantic salmon. AquaBounty, the company that created it, says the fish is safe to eat. The FDA agrees. The question is whether consumers will be persuaded.
Courtesy AquaBounty Technologies

It could soon be on your dinner plate: the first genetically modified food animal approved for Americans’ consumption. The federal Food and Drug Administration OK'd sale of GMO salmon on Thursday.

Rainn Wilson: 'I was on the chess team. Model United Nations. Computer club. Debate club. I played xylophone in the marching band, and the Shorecrest High School Highlanders wear kilts.  So I was a skinny, xylophone player in a dress.'
Flickr Photo/Jens Schott Knudsen (CC BY NC 2.0)/

Rainn Wilson – Dwight Schrute on The Office – grew up in the Seattle area and attended the University of Washington. He spoke recently with KUOW Ross Reynolds about nerd-dom, the Baha'i faith and his new book, "The Bassoon King: My Life in Art, Faith and Idiocy."

David Hyde interviews Seattle-based biologist Anne Bikle ad University of Washington Professor David Montgomery about their new book on the beneficial role microbes play in agriculture and human health called "The Hidden Half Of Nature."

King County Sheriff John Urquhart
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Bill Radke talks with King County Sheriff John Urquhart about why he's asking his off-duty deputies to carry firearms and extra ammunition following the terrorist attacks in Paris.

'Sesame Street' has included children and a new character with autism.
Screenshot from YouTube

Jeannie Yandel talks to Dr. Wendy Stone is a professor of psychology and director of the READi lab at the University of Washington. Dr. Stone was a consultant for Sesame Street as they created their first character with autism, Julia. Julia is also a character in their digital storybook, "We're Amazing, 1,2,3!"  

Poet Rick Barot reads his poem "After Darwish."
Courtesy of Mara Barot

Washington state poet laureate Elizabeth Austen presents a "darkly beautiful love poem" from Tacoma-based poet Rick Barot.

In his poem "After Darwish," he gives voice to the perennial human longing for a love without conflict, without loss. His poem borrows a line from Palestinian  poet Mahmoud Darwish's "I Want From Love Only the Beginning." 

Ralph Munro, Washington's former secretary of state, blows bubbles with Vietnamese refugees. Gov. Dan Evans asked Munro to find out more about the refugees, so he went to Camp Pendleton in California in 1975.
Courtesy of Ralph Munro

This story was first published April 9, 2015.  

Dan Evans was furious.

So furious he cursed (and he was not someone who swore).

It was 1975 and the Washington state governor had picked up the morning paper and read that Gov. Jerry Brown of California had said Vietnamese refugees wouldn’t be welcome in his state.

The French flag flies over the Space needle on Saturday Nov. 14. It was one of several displays of solidarity with France in Seattle after the terrorist attacks on Nov. 13.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Does the Space Needle flying the French flag in solidarity with victims of the Paris terror attacks represent a racist monopoly on grief? Bill Radke talks with The Stranger's Charles Mudede.

Chipotle Mexican Grill was the sight of a recent E. coli outbreak in Washington.
Flickr Photo/Frank Farm (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/

Bill Radke talks with state epidemiologist Dr. Scott Lindquist about his work to track down the source of food-borne illnesses. 

Strip-mining spoil piles in background in Colstrip, Montana, June 1973.
Flickr Photo/U.S. National Archives (Public Domain)/

David Hyde speaks with Montana Public Radio news director Eric Whitney about how a coal town in Colstrip, Montana could be shuttered by climate change.

Will The Paris Attack Change How We See Refugees?

Nov 17, 2015
Members of the Alhamdan family arrived at Sea-Tac Airport recently. They joined a tiny community of about 25 Syrian refugees who've arrived in Washington in the past few years.
Liz Jones/KUOW Public Radio

Should the U.S. suspend resettlement of Syrian refugees because one of the Paris attackers reportedly entered Europe with the recent flood of people fleeing ISIS?

At least 31 U.S. governors say yes. Not Gov. Jay Inslee – he said Washington state will keep welcoming the refugees.