The Record | KUOW News and Information

The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 4 p.m. the day that they air.

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Seven Gabels Theatre in Seattle's University District
Flickr Photo/ javacolleen (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/ https://flic.kr/p/31fDJf

Bill Radke talks to KUOW arts reporter Marcie Sillman and Sean Nelson, arts and music editor at The Stranger, about the closing of two Landmark movie theaters in Seattle, Guild 45th and Seven Gables Theatre.  

The Record: Wednesday, June 7, Full Show

Jun 7, 2017
record studio microphone
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

The doors of the Seven Gables and Guild 45th theaters are closed, most likely for good. Has Netflix killed the art house theater? Our state lawmakers are still in their second extra-special session and they still have not settled on a state budget. Why not? One giant reason is education funding. All that and more on The Record. 

Bill Radke talks with Ashley Ahearn, host of KUOW's terrestrial podcast, about about one of the more personal decisions we make around climate change: whether or not to bring children into the world.

The Record: Tuesday, June 6, Full Show

Jun 6, 2017
studio record
KUOW Photo

Has the threat of climate change made you question whether or not to have kids? The latest episode of KUOW's podcast terrestrial tackles that question. Host Ashley Ahearn shares her experience exploring that question.

Rock climber Tommy Caldwell shares his experience climbing the Dawn Wall of El Capitan and how he escaped rebels in Kyrgyzstan.

And Seahawks punter Jon Ryan will be on stage with his comedian wife, Sarah Colonna.

Brett Lowell/Courtesy of Viking/Penguin Books

Tommy Caldwell understands risk and adventure better than most. Two years ago, he became the first person to free climb the Dawn Wall of El Capitan in Yosemite National Park.

The wall is more than half a mile of sheer, vertical granite — and Caldwell made the climb with nothing but a rope tied around his waist.

Bill Radke speaks with Jeff Lew, a father of three who wanted to see if he could put an end to lunch shaming in the city -- that is the different ways schools punish children who have unpaid lunch debt. While that can range from having your meal thrown away to being stamped, Lew has been raising money to pay off as much lunch debt as he can. And he is hoping this will lead to legislation so every student, no matter what, can enjoy a hot lunch. 

The Record: Monday, June 6, Full Show

Jun 5, 2017

One Seattle dad takes to the internet to end school lunch debt for students in Seattle and beyond. The mayor of Everett is suing Purdue Pharma over opioid addiction in his city. The city claims Purdue supplied "obviously suspicious" physicians and pharmacies with Oxycontin, knowing these pills would find their way into the black market. And can we prevent terrorist attacks by regulating the Internet? Today, after the deadly attacks in London, Prime Minister Theresa May called for new international agreements to control online communication.

File photo. apartment housing apt door
Flickr Photo/Matthew Piatt (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke speaks with Jessa Lewis and Sean Flynn about a new lawsuit against the cap on move-in fees that was enacted in Seattle.

Flynn, the board president of landlord group Rental Housing Association that filed the suit, argues that the law harms smaller landlords, the last people in the city keeping housing reasonably affordable.

Lewis, the executive director of the Tenants Union of Washington state, claims that the caps are reasonable and these kinds of laws are all that allow people to still live in the city. 

The Record: Wednesday, May 31, Full Show

May 31, 2017
record studio microphone
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

After the killings on a Portland train last weekend, some free speech conservatives want to hold a rally this Sunday. Portland's mayor says that's hate speech and it's not protected. You'll meet the rally organizer and a counter-protester.

Also, some landlords are suing the city of Seattle for restricting the move-in fees they can charge. You'll hear both sides of the dispute.

And what will be left of Seattle's Chinatown/International District in 20 years? 

Cassie Chinn is the Deputy Executive Director of the Wing Luke Museum and Tam Nguyen is the owner of Tamarind Tree in Chinatown-International District
KUOW Photo/ Amina Al-Sadi

Bill Radke talks to Cassie Chinn, deputy executive director of the Wing Luke Museum, and Tam Nguyen, the owner of Tamarind Tree, about how Chinatown-International District is changing and what might be lost as the area faces the pressure of new development.  

Bill Radke talks with Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland about the City of Tacoma's plans to address homelessness.

Micah Fletcher, a victim of a stabbing attack on a light rail train that left two dead, watches as suspect Jeremy Christian is arraigned in Multnomah County Circuit Court in Portland, Ore., Tuesday, May 30, 2017.
Beth Nakamura/The Oregonian via AP, Pool

Prof. Cheryl Kaiser of the University of Washington discusses the bystander effect and whether to step into a dangerous situation to help a stranger.  

Courtesy of the Seattle Art Museum and Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore; Victoria Miro, London; David Zwirner, New York, © YAYOI KUSAMA, Photo: Cathy Carver

Bill Radke talks to KUOW arts reporter Marcie Sillman and Crosscut managing editor Florangela Davila  about two Seattle art events that change the way you experience art. Seattle Art Museum will host the popular Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors exhibit in June and the Seattle Repertory Theatre's production of "Here Lies Love" has been extended another three weeks. 

The Record: Tuesday, May 30, Full Show

May 30, 2017

You've probably heard that in Portland over the weekend a man verbally assaulted two women on a train  and called them racist names. Three bystanders stepped in to help and two of those good Samaritans were killed. We'll find out why people decide to step in and why they don't.

Also a woman who is homeless in Seattle will tell you her story about how she ended up under the West Seattle bridge and what she and others need the most.

And, if you can get in to an upcoming Seattle Art museum event it might be because we told you about it today. 

Rebecca Massey at the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Rebecca Massey drove up from Oklahoma expecting to get a job, find a place and save up some money. She said she didn’t intend on being homeless.

“I know there’s some perception that people come to Seattle seeking all the resources that they give to homeless people. I didn’t come here anticipating receiving any of those services.”

Bill Radke talks with Aaron Katz, who teaches health policy at the UW's School of Public Health, about his take on the American Health Care Act, what the new score from the Congressional Budget Office means for a potentially 23 million uninsured people and how Washington's failed health plan in the 90s can inform the future of health care in the country. 

Flickr Photo/Steven Santiago (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/q4dpg6

Bill Radke and Monica Guzman, co-founder of the Seattle newsletter The Evergrey, take calls from listeners about moving to Seattle, expectations vs. reality and the question of when do you become a local.  

Writer Kate Lebo
Heather Malcom

Bill Radke speaks with Kate Lebo about why she left her life in Seattle to move to Spokane. We all know new people are flooding into this area, but as all these people move in, who are the people moving out? 

The Record: Thursday, May 25, Full Show

May 25, 2017
studio record
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

The new health care bill is so controversial, it can make congressional candidates grab reporters by the neck and body slam them, as we found out yesterday. We'll tell you what all the CBO fuss is about.

Also, today's census report shows Seattle is the fastest-growing big city in the country. Are you new to Seattle? We want to hear from you.

Photo courtesy of The Fung Bros

The Fung Bros, Andrew and David Fung, have more than a million followers on their YouTube channel. (And yes, they're real biological brothers.) 

The Record: Wednesday, May 24, Full Show

May 24, 2017
studio record
KUOW Photo

Should people be allowed to wear masks or hoods over their faces during protests? One state lawmaker wants to make it a crime.

And two brothers from Kent have gone on to become YouTube stars. They say being the only Asian kids in their neighborhood still informs their comedy today.

Also, Q13 Fox's C.R. Douglas is with us for the hour. We'll talk with him about Hanford and the politics of density.

Ariana Grande has canceled shows in London and put her tour on hold following Monday's bombing at a concert in Manchester that killed 22 people and injured dozens more.

Yesterday Britain's prime minister Theresa May put the country on high alert, deploying the military to help guard against another attack while police investigate whether more people were involved in Monday's bombing.

Bill Radke gets hooked up to the encephalophone.
KUOW Photo/Ann Kane

Bill Radke talks with Dr. Thomas Deuel, a musician, neuroscientist and inventor of the encephalophone, an instrument you play with your brainwaves. Deuel explains why he was inspired to create the instrument, how he feels it will help people with disabilities, and he even lets Bill strap it on. Listen until the end to hear Bill's brain play a solo.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Everett Herald reporter Jerry Cornfield about the latest news from the Washington State Legislature.

Lorena Gonzalez at her election night party on Nov. 3, 2015, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Jeannie Yandel talks to Seattle City Councilmember Lorena Gonzalez about the legislation the City Council passed that will increase civilian oversight of the Seattle Police Department. 

The Record: Tuesday, May 23, Full Show

May 23, 2017
KUOW control room studio record
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Groundbreaking. Historic. Descriptions we've heard of the new police accountability law the Seattle City Council passed. We'll break down what it does. Also, the state legislature is about to head into another special session. A second special session! And former Seattle Times reporter Terry McDermott gets nostalgic about covering the Mariners and announcer Dave Niehaus.

'Passion in Red.'
CREDIT XANDRISS SINGLE LINE ARTIST HTTPS://FLIC.KR/P/N7B6V7 (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Claire Dederer’s book “Love and Trouble: A Midlife Reckoning” is a memoir. But unlike “Wild” or “Eat, Pray, Love,” it’s not the kind of memoir where a woman of a certain age goes traipsing off into the unknown to start a new life.


Parking in Seattle could become a thing of the past.
Flickr Photo/James Callan (CC BY NC SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4mBfBq

We know: It never feels like there are enough parking spots when you are driving around Seattle.

But there are more than you think. There are 500 million parking spaces in the U.S. – the same land area of Delaware and Rhode Island combined.

Snoqualmie Falls is waterfall on the Snoqualmie River between Snoqualmie and Fall City, Washington, USA. As featured in the opening credits of Twin Peaks.
Flickr Photo/Tjflex2 (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/TK9yay

Bill Radke talks to David Schmader, Seattle writer and author of the book "Weed: A User's Guide," and Leah Baltus, editor in chief of City Arts magazine, about the return of Twin Peaks, the show's impact on TV and culture, and how the new season lives up to the past two so far. 

The Record: Monday, May 22, Full Show

May 22, 2017

There's a viral video going around of a sea lion near Vancouver, BC snatching a little girl off a dock into the water. We have sea lions here, you might be tempted to feed them. We'll give you some expert advice.

Also, "Sweet Lou" Piniella, the only manager who ever took the Seattle Mariners to the playoffs, is here. We'll ask him why Bill Gates used to come into his office with a lineup card.

And Laura Palmer, agent Dale Cooper and a fictional Washington town come back to life (mostly) a quarter century later. Twin Peaks is back.

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