The Record | KUOW News and Information

The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m.

Daily conversations about the ideas that matter most to Seattle and the Puget Sound region. Hosted by Bill Radke.

What's a conversation we should be having on KUOW? Tell us! Our email address is record@kuow.org.

Ways to Connect

The Record: Thursday, January 25, 2018

Jan 25, 2018
Megan Farmer / KUOW

The state of Washington might be about to abolish the death penalty. We'll get the latest and we'll talk to a reporter who witnessed the last state execution.

Also, a University of Washington doctor has a way for you to decide now what medical interventions you want should you develop Alzheimer's.

And should Edgar Martinez be in the Baseball Hall of Fame? We think Seattle knows the answer, but we've got to go outside the Safeco bubble for this one.  

Casey Martin / KUOW

What kind of medical care would you want if you had Alzheimer's -- or dementia?

That's an uncomfortable question -- but you might be better off answering it now before dementia comes on.

Flickr Photo/ Carol Munro (CC BY-NC 2.0)/ https://flic.kr/p/7x2ngB

In the early, early hours of Tuesday morning phones lit up along the Washington coast alerting to the possibility of a tsunami. A 7.9 magnitude earthquake had just hit in the Gulf of Alaska.

The things is, not ALL the phones on the WA coast lit up. And as for that alert, it said there was a tsunami "watch" not a warning. Some people evacuated, some people didn't know whether they should.

This exposes a lot of questions about how ready we are for the big waves. The Seattle Times' science reporter Sandi Doughton explains what was learned after this latest tsunami warning.

The Record: Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Jan 24, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

When a magnitude 7.9 earthquake hit Alaska earlier this week, it triggered a tsunami alert for the Washington coast. People got advisories on their phone, but a) it was the middle of the night, who's on their phone? and b) what are you supposed do in a tsunami watch? Evacuate, or wait? Seattle Times reporter Sandi Doughton helps answer questions about how ready we are for big waves.

Mortician Caitlin Doughty, with some tools of the trade.
Photo by Jeff Minton.

Let’s talk about death.

No, seriously. It’s time we all had a conversation with our loved ones about dying.

Author Ijeoma Oluo.
Photo by Nikki Closser, with permission of the author.

So, you want to talk about race.

But... do you? Reallllly? 

For most people, the real answer is no. 

Flickr Photo/Alex Holzknecht (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8E7xgJ

Seattle was recently named the most "hygge" city in the United States. Hygge is a way of life that has been imported from Denmark. It essentially means coziness.

To combat the long, dark nights of winter, a hygge practice would include lighting your fireplace, filling a room with candles, reading cuddled up in a blanket, spending time with friends, drinking lots of wine and eating lots of cake.

The Record: Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Jan 23, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

So you want to talk about race. (You do want to talk about race, right?) Even if the person you're talking to is oblivious, or defensive? Or maybe you're oblivious and defensive? Writer Ijeoma Oluo stops by for a conversation about how we can make the race talk more doable, more productive and more hopeful.

Statue in the Monumental Cemetery of Staglieno in Genoa, Italy.
Flickr Photo/Alexander Edward (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/atrV5j

Matt Calkins was in junior high when he first started feeling intense social anxiety.

"I remember I would go on high school debate trips and I wouldn't say a word for like three days until I was actually debating," he said, speaking with Bill Radke on KUOW's The Record.

Mary Haddish, 14, left, shops with her father, Daniel Ghebre at Amazon Go on Monday, January 22, 2018, on 7th Ave., in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Nobody likes to wait in line. So today, Amazon removed that unpleasantness from the neighborhood grocery store. At Amazon Go, you walk in, pick up your groceries and walk out.

Dancer Jon Boogz.
Photo courtesy of Marcie Sillman/marciesillman.com

One of them went viral in a collaboration with Yo Yo Ma; the other played Michael Jackson for the Cirque du Soleil. But you might know dancers Lil Buck and Jon Boogz best for their collaboration on the haunting video Color of Reality.

The Record: Monday, January 22, 2018

Jan 22, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Amazon just opened a grocery store with no checkout lines — not even self-checkout scanners, you just grab your stuff and walk out. What will that convenience cost you? We talk with Geekwire's Todd Bishop and University of Washington law professor Ryan Calo about Amazon Go.

FLICKR PHOTO/sunrisesoup (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/CvLGNE

So Amazon won't be building HQ2 in Seattle. Honestly, it was a long shot. But where the company's second headquarters and its 100,000 jobs will go is still anybody's guess. Bill Radke talks with KUOW's Carolyn Adolph and Geekwire's Todd Bishop about the 20 cities that still have a shot.

Amtrak 188 derailed in Philadelphia on May 12, 2015, killing 8 and injuring more than 200.
Flickr Photo/Jack Snell (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/e72hn7

Josh Gotbaum is used to helping people. He worked on disaster relief efforts in the Clinton administration, helped bring Hawaiian Airlines back from bankruptcy, and served as founding CEO of The September 11th Fund. But on May 12th, 2015, the helper became the helped when the train he was on came off the tracks.  

The Record: Thursday, January 18, 2018

Jan 18, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

On today's show we get local reaction to the hint Amazon has given us as to which city will be their new second headquarters.

Also, Amtrak promises to pay for the fatal derailment near Tacoma. They'll pay medical expenses and cleanup. But a man who was on a derailed Amtrak train three years ago says our local victims are in for a rude awakening.

And should Seattle get rid of on-street parking downtown to make room for dedicated bus lanes so buses become fast, so you won't want a car, so you won't need parking?

The Record: Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Jan 17, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

We spend most of today's show talking about the recent Babe.com piece about comedian Aziz Ansari. Some see it as sexual assault, some see overreaction, others see not enough reacting. We'll talk it over with Seattle writers Katie Anthony, Erica C. Barnett and Katie Herzog and take your calls.

Aziz Ansari seen at Netflix original series "Master of None" ATAS panel at the Wolf Theater at Saban Media Center on Monday, June 05, 2017, in Los Angeles, CA.
(Photo by Eric Charbonneau/Invision for Netflix/AP Images)

Recent allegations against actor Aziz Ansari have launched a thousand thinkpieces. Depending on your point of view, this is either a death knell to the #metoo movement or just another link in patriarchy's mighty armor.

When local author Katie Anthony first heard the story, her kneejerk reaction was, "Really? That's just a bad date — we've all been on them." 

The Record: Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Jan 16, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

So you're eating breakfast on Oahu and your phone vibrates. It’s a text, and it says "Emergency Alert. Ballistic missile threat inbound to Hawaii. Seek immediate shelter. This is not a drill." What you would you do next? KUOW's Ann Dornfeld will tell you what she did, and it involves Whole Foods.

Courtesy of Ann Dornfeld

For more than half an hour last Saturday, people thought Hawaii was about to be hit by a ballistic missile after officials mistakenly sent an alert that warned of an attack.

Flickr Photo/ sharkhats (CC BY-NC 2.0)/ https://flic.kr/p/qFaSB8

Bill Radke talks to aerospace and science editor for Geekwire, Alan Boyle, about some mysterious bursts of radio waves coming from three billion light-years away and what he explains what you should do if you find see bits of a space lab falling from the sky

The Record: Thursday, January 11, 2018

Jan 11, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Governor Jay Inslee is in our studio to answer questions about his relationship with President Trump, drilling off Washington waters, plans for a carbon tax and much more.

Olympia Washington State Legislature
Flickr Photo/Harvey Barrison (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Washington state Sen. Schoesler (R-Ritzville), about issues that will arise in the state legislature in the 2018 session. 

Deputy Chief Carmen Best, left, and Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole listen as mayor Jenny Durkan speaks during a press conference on Monday, December 4, 2017, at Seattle City Hall.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to The Seattle Times criminal justice reporter Steve Miletich about U.S. District Judge James Robart's ruling that found the Seattle Police Department was in full and effective compliance with the court ordered reforms. 

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Bill Radke talks with Washington state Governor Jay Inslee about his plans for a carbon tax, President Trump's plans for our weed and offshore oil, a future White House run and more.

Washington State Capitol
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Hayat Norimine, associate editor for Seattle Met's PubliCola, about a bill in the state legislature that would remove the statute of limitation on felony sex offenses. Right now victims in our state only have three years to pursue charges after a crime happens, or ten years if they reported the crime to the police in the first year after the crime was committed. This is one of the shortest statute of limitations for rape in the country. 

The Record: Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Jan 10, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

After Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, a Bellevue woman with family on the island organized her own relief effort and moved her mother and brother to Seattle. We'll check back in with Fernmarie Rodriguez for an update four months after the storm.

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Bill Radke talks again with Fernmarie Rodriguez, nearly four months after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico and Fernmarie organized her own relief effort from her home in Bellevue.

Shaun Scott (nametag misspelled)  and Hanna Brooks Olsen, holding the coffees they chose to buy instead of putting down payments on a home. Michael Hobbes has a policy of keeping his face off of the internet. Overhead sparkles are complete happenstance.
KUOW Photo/Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong

If you believe the New York Times, or watch CNN, or have read a thinkpiece between now and 2007 — you already know the bad news: The world is ending. Millennials, the generation born between 1982 and 2000, have arrived to ruin #allthethings, blanketing the landscape with a thick carpet of Snapchat filters, participation trophies, and avocado toast. What does this, the most entitled cohort to ever walk the earth, expect from life? It might not be what you think.

The Record: Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Jan 9, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Governor Inslee is proposing a carbon tax. Who would pay, and will it actually happen? KUOW's Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins explains.

Department of Natural Resources estimates that the landslide volume is approximately 4 million cubic yards and covers an area of about 20 acres.
Washington State Department of Natural Resources

Bill Radke talks to David Montgomery, professor of geology at the University of Washington, about the crack in Rattlesnake Ridge and what geologist and state officials are looking for as they monitor the slow moving slide.  

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