The Record | KUOW News and Information

The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 4 p.m. the day that they air.

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Follow @KUOW and #KUOWrecord to join our daily discussion on Twitter. You can also send questions and comments to record@kuow.org.

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A North Korean soldier looks at the southern side through a pair of binoculars at the border village of Panmunjom, north of Seoul, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2003.
AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

Bill Radke, along with Livewire's Luke Burbank, speaks with author and journalist Blaine Harden about the recent war of words between President Donald Trump and North Korea leader Kim Jong Un. Harden explains why he doesn't believe North Korea actually wants start a war with America. 

Bill Radke talks with sportswriters Percy Allen and Michael-Shawn Dugar about the protests that rippled across the entire NFL schedule after President Trump said he'd love to see owners fire players for disrespecting the national anthem.

Doug Pray, director of the Grunge documentry Hype! (L) and Megan Jasper, CEO of Sub Pop Records
KUOW PHOTO/ Megan Farmer

The year was 1992. Nirvana and Pearl Jam were all over MTV, and everyone was sweating in flannel. Seattle’s grunge scene had ballooned into a global phenomenon.

So of course, The New York Times came calling.

The Record: Monday, September 25, Full Show

Sep 25, 2017
KUOW control room studio record
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

It's not just a few Seattle Seahawks and Colin Kaepernick: The debate over how athletes respect the flag is spreading to more teams, more sports and to the U.S. presidency.

Also, going undercover with the so-called alt right. You'll meet a man who pretended to be a white supremacist in order to infiltrate neo-Nazis in Seattle and beyond.

And 20 years after the documentary "Hype!" about the 90s Seattle grunge scene, what has Seattle learned about greed?

I went undercover in Seattle’s white nationalist group

Sep 22, 2017
Patrik Hermansson, a Swedish activist, spent time with the Northwest Forum in June.
Courtesy of HOPE not hate

For the past year, Patrik Hermansson, a young, gay, anti-racist activist from Sweden has been undercover inside white nationalist — also known as ‘alt-right’ — groups for HOPE not hate, a UK group. One of his assignments took him to Seattle. This is an excerpt from his report.

A pro-Trump rally attendee listens to an organizer speak at Westlake Plaza in downtown Seattle on Monday, May 1, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

On Wednesday we aired an interview with a man who wore a Nazi armband in Seattle. According to people observing him on the bus and then downtown, this man harassed black people — by yelling and throwing bananas at them. 


The Record: Thursday, September 21, Full Show

Sep 21, 2017
record studio microphone
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

We're going to start our show with your objections to it.

Yesterday, we spoke with a man who wore a swastika armband in downtown Seattle.

We got a lot of feedback from you. You had legitimate concerns and we discussed them on our show — and with a historian who put this interview in a historical context.

Courtesy of Darrell Smart

“I love hearing a lawyer embracing risk.”

Those affirmative words came from professional climbing guide Dallas Glass, speaking with climber Darrell Smart, whose day job is as a litigator.

Your feedback on The Record's interview with a neo-Nazi

Sep 21, 2017

Brendan Sweeney is KUOW's managing producer. He oversees The Record.

On yesterday’s episode of The Record, Bill Radke spoke with a Seattleite who wore a Nazi band in public. The conversation aired at 12:57 p.m.

The response from our audience was swift and largely negative. Broadly speaking, that feedback via phone calls, emails, tweets and Facebook posts fell into two categories:

The Record: Wednesday, September 20

Sep 20, 2017

Fifteen years ago, it looked so sparkly. An unfolding renaissance in American cities like Seattle. Author Richard Florida wrote about the promise of those cities that can attract innovators, designers, urban tech. Now Florida has a new book about how all that has worked out. It's less sparkly.

KUOW PHOTOS/MEGAN FARMER

Bill Radke talks to Turina James who supports safe consumption sites and Corri Durrant who opposes them about how drug abuse has affected their lives and informed their position on King County's proposal to open two safe consumption sites.  

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The rising cost of housing in America's most desirable "creative" cities troubles Richard Florida, urbanist thinker and author. In those cities, the cost of housing is affordable only to the creative class themselves. The rest of the working population — those in service industry or manufacturing — struggle to keep up with rising housing prices.

Florida says what's happening in Seattle, specifically, is surprising even to someone like him, "supposedly in the know."

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks with Thanh Tan and James Hong about the lasting impact of the Vietnam War on the children of Vietnamese refugees. Tan is host of KUOW's new podcast Second Wave. Hong is executive director of Seattle's Vietnamese Friendship Association.

In the latest episode of Second Wave, Tan interviews filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick about their new documentary "The Vietnam War."

The Record: Tuesday, September 19, Full Show

Sep 19, 2017
studio record
KUOW Photo

Today you'll meet Seattle's new mayor, before the new new mayor comes later this fall.

Also, what do you think you know about Vietnamese-Americans? You'll find out why your mental images of the Vietnam War are probably not helping.

And, have you seen "the punch"? A man wearing a swastika armband in downtown Seattle was punched and knocked out cold. With that armband this man associated himself with murderers. Does that make it ethical to physically attack him? And what does that achieve?

The Record: Monday, September 18, Full Show

Sep 18, 2017
KUOW Photo

Today, Seattle will get its third mayor in under a week. What have we learned from this whole unwanted experiment?

Also, a new Seattle start up launches today. They'll help pay for your down payment — if you'll agree to become an Airbnb host.

And we'll ask Puget Sound newcomers to tell us a story -- what did you expect it to be like here and what is it actually like here?

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Ben Blum about his new book "Ranger Games: A Story of Soldiers, Family, and Inexplicable Crime." The book tells the story of his cousin, Alex Blum, and how he turned from an Army Ranger to a bank robber.

KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

Bill Radke and Monica Guzman talk to newcomers about the things that surprised them when they moved to the Seattle area. Guzman is the co-founder of The Evergrey.

Demand is soaring for Seattle-area homes. Buyers who want to succeed are bidding up prices. This Seattle house recently sold for $100,000 over the asking price.
Courtesy of Seattle MLS

Bill Radke speaks with Geekwire writer Monica Nickelsburg about a new Seattle based startup called Loftium which will help you buy a house — if you agree to rent out a spare bedroom on Airbnb and split the profits with them.

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke speaks with John Fox, of the Seattle Displacement Coalition, and Roger Valdez, of Smart Growth Seattle, about their (very different) ideas for how to make sure Seattle has enough affordable housing for those who need it.


The Record: Thursday, September 14, Full Show

Sep 14, 2017
studio record
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

We're getting at the big questions today. First of all, Seattle's mayor is gone after sex abuse allegations that he denies. Beyond one politician, sexual abuse is a societal crisis that we all know about and most of us ignore. How can that be and what are we going to about it?

Big question number two: What are we going to do about the price of living in Seattle? What would keep this city affordable for everyone? More upzoning and development? Or do developers just make housing more expensive? And ruin neighborhoods?

Big question number three: Can we make our world the place we want it to be by shifting our outlook? You'll meet the author of the new book, "Why Buddhism Is True." 

Executive Director of Shepherd's Counseling Services Janice Palm poses for a portrait on Thursday, September 14, 2017, at Shepherd's in Seattle. KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

There is a crisis that many of us would rather not face — childhood sexual abuse. 

According to Janice Palm, who works with adult survivors of sexual abuse at Shepard’s Counseling Service, one in four girls and one in six boys will be sexually abused before they turn 18.

The Record: Wednesday, September 13, Full Show

Sep 13, 2017
studio record
KUOW Photo

Seattle's mayor is resigning today after another allegation of sexual abuse. Meanwhile, the two people running for his job debated each other last night. We'll capture both of those events today.

And Beach Boys lead singer Mike Love is in our studio. He'll tell you about blending voices and transcendental meditation and what you probably think of him and Brian Wilson.

Flickr photo/Bill Holmes (CC BY-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/tujYE

Bill Radke talks to Coral Garnick, retail reporter for the Puget Sound Business Journal, about the latest move Nordstrom is making in retail and what is says about the changing industry.

The Record: Tuesday, September 12, Full Show

Sep 12, 2017
studio record
KUOW Photo

There's another man accusing Seattle mayor Ed Murray of sexual abuse. This time, the accuser is Murray's younger cousin. We'll tell you what we do and don't know know so far.

Also, Nordstrom is opening a clothing store without clothing. It's more about the stylist and the wine and the experience.  

And a local wildlife photographer will tell you the story of the monkey selfie — the famous photo of a crested macaque grinning into a camera. Since the monkey pressed the button there's a legal argument over who gets to profit from it. And now there is a settlement in that case.

Flickr Photo/Daniel Hartwig/(CC BY 2.0)https://flic.kr/p/6eDGEA

Jeannie Yandel speaks with NPR music critic Ann Powers about her most recent book, "Good Booty: Love and Sex, Black and White, Body and Soul in American Music."

The Record: Monday, September 11, Full Show

Sep 11, 2017
KUOW Photo

How should Seattle react to Amazon shopping itself to other cities? Should we be glad there won't be another 50,000 Amazon jobs coming here? Should we give Amazon more of what they want? We're going to have that debate.

Also, you'll meet a so-called bikini barista who does not appreciate the city of Everett telling her what she can wear at her job.

And Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson launches a new startup company where you get an exclusive inside look at his failing to score a single touchdown yesterday.

The inside of the elevators at Amazon headquarters in Seattle. People who work at Amazon refer to themselves as Amazonians.
Flickr File Photo/cheukiecfu CC BY-NC-ND: http://bit.ly/1MUXs0y

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant, Washington State GOP chair Susan Hutchison, and Geekwire editor and co-founder Todd Bishop about whether or not Seattle's progressive climate has pushed Amazon to open a second headquarters outside of Seattle.

 The Natte Latte coffee stand in 1999, which launched the Pacific Northwest's sexy espresso stand trend.
Courtesy of Mary Keller Wynn

Bill Radke talks to Amelia Powell, a barista in Everett who works at Hillbilly Hotties, about the lawsuit she and fellow baristas are filing against the city of Everett over the new ordinance that would restrict the type of clothing they wear at work. The new ordinance passed unanimously in the Everett City Council and would effectively put an end to the bikini barista stands in Everett.

Author and filmmaker Sherman Alexie waits with dancers backstage for his turn on stage as the keynote speaker at a celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day Monday, Oct. 10, 2016, at Seattle's City Hall.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Who better to talk sex with than self-described "old, gray-haired dads" Sherman Alexie and Daniel Handler? KUOW’s Bill Radke sat down with the two authors to talk about how adolescence has gone from treehouses in the woods to porn on phones.

Courtesy of Leo Carmona

Bill Radke talks with Ray Corona about President Trump's decision to end the DACA program. Corona is a DACA recipient and executive director of the non-profit Somos Seattle.

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