The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 4 p.m. the day that they air.

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Sound of the Day: What interesting sound do you hear throughout the day? Record 30 seconds and send it to us, along with the story behind it. Email it to record@kuow.org with “Sound of the Day” in the subject line.

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Betu Allami (left) and Nayyef Hrebid (right) met in 2004, during the seige of Ramadi. Hrebid was a translator with the U.S. Marines, and Allami was an Iraqi soldier. "I saw him," says Hrebid, 'and I was like, oh my God, he is so handsome. He is perfect.'
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

This is a story about love and war; love lost and love found again.

In 2004, Nayyef Hrebid was an interpreter for the U.S. Marines in Iraq, and Betu Allami was a soldier with the Iraqi Army.

Ramadi General Hospital had been taken over by insurgents, and Hrebid and Allami were part of a mission to reclaim the hospital. It was a dangerous mission, in a dangerous city, at a dangerous time in the war. 

The Record: Thursday, Feb 11, Full Show

20 hours ago
KUOw control room studio
KUOw Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bad news out of Boeing as reports surface of a federal investigation and layoffs. We're going to get some answers. 

Also, how do you know when a child  has a psychotic disorder? It's challenging to diagnose in kids.

And just in time for Valentine's day hear about a Seattle couple who found each other during the war in Iraq with all the odds against them.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

A view from inside a Boeing factory.
Courtesy of Boeing

Bill Radke talks to aerospace analyst Richard Aboulafia, vice president of the Teal Group, about Boeing's announced layoffs and the reports of a U.S. Securities And Exchange Commission investigation into the company. 

Fallon was diagnosed with psychosis at age 16. No one knows if psychosis is something Fallon will have to live with forever, or if it was a one-time episode.
KUOW Photo

Bill Radke talks with Dr. Jack McClellan about the challenges of diagnosing and treating psychotic disorders in children. McClellan is medical director of the Child Study and Treatment Center, Washington state's psychiatric hospital for children. He's also professor of psychiatry at the University of Washington.

More from KUOW: I Always Wondered What A Psychiatric Hospital Was Like, And There I Was

Bill Radke speaks with Anna Griffin, reporter for Oregon Public Broadcasting, about the dramatic, peaceful end to a 41-day standoff at Oregon's Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.

The surrender of the remaining four holdouts was broadcast live via cellphone to a "riveting and incredibly disturbing" audio feed on YouTube. "It's as if," Griffin said "you could be inside the white Bronco with O.J. Simpson as he livestreams himself."

Lisa Sawyer and Steven Drogosz are living in a hotel in SeaTac
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Lisa Sawyer and Steven Drogosz have been together for about six years. They met volunteering at a food bank, they noticed each other and one thing led to another.

AP Photo/John Zeedick

Bill Radke talks with Bloomberg News reporter Spencer Soper about Amazon's plans to move into the shipping business.

The Record: Wednesday, Feb 10, Full Show

Feb 10, 2016
Sound board
KUOW Photo

Washington state may be thought of as Democrat heavy, but today we talk to a local Donald Trump supporter. Also, Marilyn McKenna thinks that if you're a feminist, you should vote Republican.

The Interstate 405 tolls have been a big money maker for the state, hear from the woman whose job it is to convince people to get around them (by carpooling).

How do stereotypes affect young black men? A UW researcher says it comes down to resisting, embracing or believing a person is the exception.

Listen to the full show above or check out the individual stories:

Flickr Photo/Christopher Cook (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/CHoGCh

Bill Radke talks to Onnie Rogers, research assistant professor at the University of Washington's Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences about her work on how stereotypes affect young black men. 

A toll area on Interstate 405.
Flickr Photo/SounderBruce (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ruiWYC

Bill Radke talks with Debbie Jaksich, program manager for King County's Communities In Motion program about the benefits of carpooling.

A voter marks a ballot for the New Hampshire primary inside a voting booth at a polling place Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016, in Manchester, N.H.
AP Photo/David Goldman

Bill Radke asks Marilyn McKenna why she thinks Seattle women should consider voting Republican in 2016. For further listening, check out this discussion Radke hosted yesterday concerning the Democratic candidates: Debate: Do Feminists Have To Vote For Hilary?

Bill Radke speaks with Chris Osterhaug about why he wants Donald Trump to be the next U.S. president. Osterhaug is a Republican from Edmonds. He started the Facebook group Washington State For Donald Trump 2016.

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about Canada's decision to stop air strikes against ISIS. 

The Record: Tuesday, Feb. 9, Full Show

Feb 9, 2016

"There is a special place in hell for women who don't help each other" -- What do you mean, Madeleine Albright? Is a feminist obligated to vote for Hillary Clinton? And why? We'll talk that out.

Also, with the concerns about the Zika virus, we ask what is it like to have a child with microcephaly?

And what are the Seahawks without Marshawn Lynch?

Listen to the full show above or check out the individual stories:

 Running back Marshawn Lynch talks with reporters on Jan. 27, 2015.
Flickr Photo/WEBN-TV (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/qXNecT

Bill Radke talks with Mike Pesca of Slate's "The Gist" podcast about Seattle Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch's unusual retirement announcement on Sunday. Lynch took to Twitter during the Super Bowl to post a photo of a pair of cleats hanging from telephone wires. 

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