The Record | KUOW News and Information

The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m.

Daily conversations about the ideas that matter most to Seattle and the Puget Sound region. Hosted by Bill Radke.

Have a story that we should be talking about? Tell us! Our email address is record@kuow.org.

Ways to Connect

The Record: Monday, November 20, 2017

19 hours ago
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Land of the free, home of the easily swayed? Studio 360 host and author Kurt Andersen will tell you how this country has always swallowed fake news, all the way back to its colonist beginnings. He's written a new book called "Fantasyland."

A person sleeps on a bench in a Seattle park.
Flickr Photo/mitchell haindfield (CC BY 2.0)/ flic.kr/p/rnqQho

Last week, Seattle’s leaders rejected a proposed head tax on big business, with the money going to pay for homeless services. But an investigation by the Puget Sound Business Journal found the homelessness crisis isn’t being driven by a lack of money — there’s more than $1 billion spent annually on services for the homeless.

The Record: Thursday, November 16, 2017

Nov 16, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Astronaut Scott Kelly spent nearly a year living aboard the International Space Station so we could learn what that would do to his mind and body. He's in our studio to tell us about it.

An empty classroom in Parrington Hall where Bangally Fatty was enrolled and taking a class is shown on the University of Washington campus on Thursday, November 16, 2017, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The University of Washington is facing a test of what it means to be a so-called sanctuary campus. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement has detained a UW student. He’s the first student detainee that the university knows about.

KUOW race and equity reporter Liz Jones reported the story; The Record host Bill Radke sat down with Liz to learn more.

Nathan Cultee dumps 16 farm-raised Atlantic salmon into a container on Tuesday, August 22, 2017, at Home Port Seafood in Bellingham.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Lynda Mapes, environment reporter for The Seattle Times, about where all of the nearly 100,000 escaped Atlantic salmon went and what lawmakers in Olympia plan to do about it. 

The Record: Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Nov 15, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

State lawmakers will get more sexual harassment-prevention training. Will that help reduce harassment and assault by lawmakers, staffers and lobbyists in Olympia? KUOW's Austin Jenkins is back on the show to tell us the latest on how state government is changing how it handles misconduct in the workplace.

KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Superhero movies smashed through the box office this summer, like seemingly every year. The top three grossed $2.6 billion. At the same time that comic hero profits have been rising, religiosity in America has been on the decline.

Bill Radke sat down with authors Reza Aslan and G. Willow Wilson to ask if superheroes are filling our moral and cultural need to connect with something larger than ourselves.

The Record: Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Nov 14, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Last summer's top-grossing movies: "Guardians of the Galaxy" from Marvel Comics, "Spiderman" and "Wonder Woman." Superheroes are big with audiences. Meanwhile, organized religion has declined in this country. Is that a coincidence? Or are superheroes the new religion? We talk with Reza Aslan, author of "God: A Human History," and Seattle writer G. Willow Wilson, author of the latest Ms. Marvel series. 

Michael-Shawn Dugar, Seahawks reporter for Seattle PI.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Last Thursday’s Seahawks game was a great opportunity to practice up on some Greek vocabulary terms. Let’s start with “Pyrrhic victory.”

The Record: Monday, November 13, 2017

Nov 13, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

He's not hoping for a cure just yet, but Bill Gates is giving $50 million toward Alzheimer's research. Erica Farrell of the Washington State chapter of the national Alzheimer's Association tells you what we do and don't know about dementia, including how to deal with it the best you can.

Bill Radke speaks with Erica Farrell, clinical manager for the Washington chapter of the Alzheimer's Association, about what we know and don't know about Alzheimer's and why she's optimistic an effective treatment can be found. 

The theater revised its number of seats down from 798 to 570. The seats are leather and offer enough leg room for an average size adult woman to fully extend her legs (claim tested).
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

Bill Radke talks to Dominique Cantwell, executive director of Bainbridge Performing Arts, and Warren Etheredge, curator of  Walla Walla Movie Crush and former programmer for the Seattle International Film Festival, about how they decide, as gatekeepers for arts organizations, when to cut ties with national artists who have been accused of assault and when to showcase their work. 

Flickr Photo/C. Jill Reed (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/4ohmf7

The massacre in Sutherland Springs last weekend was yet another moment in the painful parade of gun violence in America. This particular tragedy is also part of a long history of violence against religious sanctuaries, dating back to the Civil Rights movement and beyond.

The Record: Thursday, November 9, 2017

Nov 9, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Seattle elected a woman to be its mayor for the first time in almost a century. Vancouver did the same, for the first time in the city's entire 160 years. Why are more women running and winning? We talk with political consultant Cathy Allen.

Facebook
Flickr Photo/Franco Bouly (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/6rk2Qf

Bill Radke talks to Anna Lauren Hoffmann, associate professor at the University of Washington's Information School, about the implications of Facebook's idea to stop revenge porn and nude pictures from circulating on their site. 

The Record: Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Nov 8, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Election night was good for Democrats here in Washington and across the country. Our politics roundtable tells you what happened and what it means. We'll talk with Jenny Durkan, in the lead to be Seattle's next mayor. And state Republican Party chairman Susan Hutchison makes the case for why her party should be optimistic.

The Record: Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Nov 7, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Bill Nye says climate change deniers are struggling with cognitive dissonance. He joins us from Los Angeles to talk about his new film "Bill Nye: Science Guy" and how he's taking on cognitive dissonance to save the world.

The Record: Monday, November 6, 2017

Nov 6, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Former Hole drummer Patty Schemel is telling her story of addiction, recovery and coming up in Seattle's music scene. She'll tell you about her memoir, "Hit So Hard."

A little girl looks over her father's shoulder at a smartphone.
Flickr Photo/Lynn Friedman (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/s29eap

How do old parenting dilemmas adapt to new technologies? Parents: when you’re raising kids in the technological age, how much wiggle room with screen time do you give them? How has your own tech use changed in response to what you want them to be doing? And … is it really tech time if everyone is playing with a sensor-enabled ball, but you’re all outside?

Jessyn Farrell was a state legislator representing northeast Seattle. She was also a candidate for Seattle mayor.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

 


Jessyn Farrell wants to see a profound culture shift in Olympia.

The Record: Thursday, November 2, 2017

Nov 2, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

When Democratic state lawmaker Jim Jacks of Vancouver abruptly resigned his seat in 2011, the public was told it was for “personal and family reasons.” Turns out, there was more to the story. KUOW’s Austin Jenkins explains.

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Do you ever come across an item — bottle caps, Styrofoam — you’re not sure you can recycle? Or did you read the story about China no longer accepting our recyclables and panic?

Flickr Photo/ Scott Beale/Laughing Squid (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/ https://flic.kr/p/c3y5to

Jeannie Yandel talks to comedian and writer John Hodgman about mansplaining, white culture and his book, "Vacationland: True Stories from Painful Beaches." Also: how the universe is not organized around Seattle.

The Record: Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Nov 1, 2017
KUOW Photo/ Megan Farmer

We spend this hour of The Record with WNYC's Brooke Gladstone, co-host and editor of On The Media. She'll tell you how media can distort reality and what you can do about it.

From left, James Marx, Carrie Howell, Robin Mueller and Haley Ballast write letters of support after a flier from the group Respect Washington circulated Burien, on Monday, October 30, 2017, in Burien.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to KUOW's immigration reporter Liz Jones about a letter that was mailed to some residents in Burien that listed the names and addresses of people who were accused of committing crimes and believed to be undocumented residents. 

The Record: Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Oct 31, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Someone is sending letters with the names and addresses of supposed undocumented immigrants with criminal records to Burien residents ahead of a contentious City Council race. Are the mailers accurate? Legal? Ethical? KUOW’s Liz Jones has reaction from Burien.

Lindy West: 'I'm reclaiming the term witch hunt'

Oct 30, 2017
Author Lindy West lives in Seattle.
Photo by Jenny Jimenez / http://photojj.com

Lindy West knows what she wants men to do next. And it doesn’t involve making shameful public confessions or warning about possible “witch hunts” against powerful men.

The Record: Monday, October 30, 2017

Oct 30, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

President Trump's former campaign manager pled not guilty today to money laundering and other charges. Does his indictment move Trump closer to impeachment or farther away? We’ll talk with The Washington Post’s Libby Casey.

Lines of code
Flickr Photo/markus spiske (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/XLGzE5


Thinking of making a career switch? Maybe you should consider coding.

No, really — it’s not as hard as you probably think. That’s according to Cheri Allen, a software engineer and educator at the University of Washington and Unloop.

A box containing an order from Amazon.com is shown after it was delivered to a house in Etters, Pa, Wednesday, Sept 16, 2005.
AP Photo/John Zeedick

Bill Radke talks with Washington Post opinion columnist Christine Emba about Amazon Key, a new delivery service from Amazon that drops off packages inside customer's homes.

Emba's latest column in titled "Amazon Key is Silicon Valley at its most out of touch."

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