The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 4 p.m. the day that they air.

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Sound of the Day: What interesting sound do you hear throughout the day? Record 30 seconds and send it to us, along with the story behind it. Email it to record@kuow.org with “Sound of the Day” in the subject line.

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Lisa Hallett holding a photo of her husband John
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Mile one: “Oh my God, the babies didn’t stop crying for the last hour and a half.”

Mile two: “I need to buy diapers, what am I going to make for dinner, there’s baby food stuck in the carpet, what am I going to do?”

Mile three and four: “All of a sudden the business and the high energy of that day to day life with young children, it starts to quiet down.”

Mile five: “It’s just quiet, there’s nothing.”

Mile six: “Oh shit, my husband died.”

The Record: Thursday, May 26, full show

May 26, 2016
Microphone in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

If your drive into work and this morning was maddeningly slow and congested, stick around. We've got a discussion coming up about whether the city's traffic planning essentially means a war on the single-car driver.

We'll also talk about some possible ways forward that would mean everyone can get where they need to go.

Also, we'll take a look at one of the most restricted places in the state.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Has Seattle declared a war on cars?

May 26, 2016
Traffic on Second Avenue in downtown Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1irsJLd

Bill Radke speaks with Brier Dudley about his recent column in the Seattle Times about what he argues is Mayor Ed Murray's attack on single occupancy cars. Also, Tom Fucoloro from the Seattle Bike Blog joins the conversation. He wrote a response to Dudley's article here.

Flickr Photo/Vox Efx (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks with Princeton University political science professor Christopher Achen about his research into how Americans make up their minds when casting a ballot.

Courtesy of Jeff Emtman

Bill Radke speaks with Bethany Denton and Jeff Emtman about their story about the sexually violent predators who reside in the special commitment center on McNeil Island in Washington state.

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about the novel "Imagine Me Gone" by Adam Haslett.

The Record: Wednesday, May 25th, Full Show

May 25, 2016
Sound board studio
KUOW Photo

There was a time when the city of Seattle wouldn't let people call the Jungle home. We'll talk to the man who used to handle the homeless encampment under Interstate 5. 

And you know the trolls, online haters that we're told just not to confront. Seattle writer Lindy West will tell you why she doesn't follow that advice.

Also, Seattle is changing a lot. We'll get a poet's perspective on it.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Author Lindy West lives in Seattle.
Photo by Jenny Jimenez / http://photojj.com

Jeannie Yandel talks to Seattle writer Lindy West about her new book, "Shrill: Notes From A Loud Woman." In it West talks about how she found her voice, reclaimed the word "fat" and began fighting misogyny on the internet. 

A camp area at the caves in the north part of the Jungle, Seattle's notorious homeless encampment that leapt onto the map after a fatal shooting in January.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with Jordan Royer about his experience managing the Jungle in the early 2000s. Royer was in charge of dealing with the homeless camp under Interstate 5 under Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels. He said the city can manage the Jungle, but it most likely will never be able to truly shut it down. 

Seattle skyline
Flickr Photo/Steven Santiago (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/q4dpg6

Elizabeth Austen talks to Seattle's first civic poet Claudia Castro Luna about how poetry can be used to talk about the changing city. 

She is holding a series of poetry workshops around Seattle called "The Poet Is In."

The Record: Tuesday, May 24, full show

May 25, 2016
KUOW Photo

You can vote in today's Washington state primary, but it doesn't mean your vote will count for much. What would it take to improve the maddening way we run elections?

Also, Seattle Supersonics legend Spencer Haywood tells you how this city treated him as he challenged the NBA in the U.S. Supreme Court in the 1970s.

And Portland is giving bus tickets out of town for people who are homeless.

Bill Radke talks with former Seattle Supersonic Spencer Haywood about his legal battle with the National Basketball Association and how his Supreme Court case paved the way for a generation of NBA stars.

A line of homeless people outside a shelter in downtown Seattle.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Bill Radke speaks with Susan Salisbury and Sara Rankin about a Portland, Oregon program that provides one-way tickets for homeless people who have a better situation somewhere else but no way to get there. Salisbury is with 211 Info, the group running the Portland pilot project. Rankin heads the Homeless Rights Advocacy Project at Seattle University. 

Ballot drop box in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Bill Radke speaks with former head of the state Republican party Kirby Wilbur and former head of the state Democratic party Dwight Pelz about how to simplify the way Washington state chooses presidential nominees.

The Record: Monday, May 23, full show

May 23, 2016
KUOW control room studio
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

At the Washington state Republican convention, virtually every delegate slot went to Ted Cruz, who is no longer running for president. What those delegates going to do at the national convention?

Also, sex solicitation tends to happen in the afternoon, at work computers, by male employees with money. What responsibility do our local tech companies bear?

And a local writer confronts depression with the help of the drag queen RuPaul.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

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