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The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 4 p.m. the day that they air.

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President Donald Trump talks with Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg upon his arrival on Air Force One at Charleston International Airport in North Charleston, S.C., Friday, Feb. 17, 2017.
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Bill Radke talks to Emily Parkhurst, editor in chief of the Puget Sound Business Journal, about why the CEO of Boeing stayed on President Trump's manufacturing council (until it disbanded) and how the president's tweet about Amazon will affect the company. 

Comedians Hari Kondabolu, left, and Dwayne Kennedy, right.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Comedians Hari Kondabolu and Dwayne Kennedy chat with KUOW's Bill Radke on the threat from North Korea, performing in front of conservative audiences and what threat Hillary Clinton would have posed to the world. 


The Record: Wednesday, August 16, Full Show

22 hours ago
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KUOW Photo

President Trump: If Robert E. Lee statues come down, what about statues of the slave holder George Washington? We have one of those in Seattle -- a 14-foot tall bronze statue of Washington at the university of Washington. What purpose does it serve? Should it come down? We'll debate that.

Also, Seattle mayoral candidate Nikkita Oliver concedes the primary election but endorsed no one. Does she have no preference between Jenny Durkan and Cary Moon? We'll ask her.

The Record: Tuesday, August 15, Full Show

Aug 15, 2017
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KUOW Photo

Seattle's mayor denies allegations that he sexually abused teenagers decades ago. Some people want him to resign anyway for the sake of all the victims whose true stories were not believed. But what about Murray's right to be presumed innocent? What about the rights of Seattle citizens to an orderly transition of power? We'll have that debate.

Also, Seattle is the first American city to use democracy vouchers -- tax money that citizens use to support candidates of their choice. We'll see how it's going so far.

And on a lighter note, a creamier note, two giants of Seattle ice cream will tell you ice cream stories and take your flavor suggestions.

KUOW photo / Jeannie Yandel

Bill Radke talks with University of Washington professor Cate Goethals and political strategist Cathy Allen about gender equity in politics and business.  

Bill Radke talks to Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation, about Seahawks player Michael Bennett's decision to sit during the national anthem at the Seahawks' first pre-season game against the San Diego Chargers. 

The Record: Monday, August 14, Full Show

Aug 14, 2017
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Yesterday's counter-demonstrators tried to push past police to confront a Patriot Prayer rally in Westlake Park. What is the best response to bigotry?

Also, Seattle will have its first woman mayor in about a century. We'll talk to two woman who say there's a lot more to be done.

And a Seahawks star refuses to stand during yesterday's national anthem.

KUOW PHOTO/DANIEL BERMAN

"What surprises me is, quite frankly, the outrage of our white progressives who continue to be surprised. For people of color, this is our life every day."

Gray wolf
Flickr Photo/USFWS Pacific Region (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Lynda Mapes, Seattle Times environment reporter, about Robert Wielgus, the Washington State University researcher whose work on cougars and wolves in Washington state angered lawmakers and ranchers and led to a loss of funding for his research and a lack of support from his employer.

The Record: Thursday, August 10, Full Show

Aug 10, 2017
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KUOW Photo

Today we're bringing people together, like the head of Washington state's Republican and Democratic parties.

And comedians Hari Kondabolu and Dwayne Kennedy will come together to talk North Korean warheads, Cold War and existential dread. There's a decent chance you'll hear some early Sting in that conversation.

Plus, the Seattle Mariners would be in the playoffs if the season ended today. We've asked Major League Baseball to do that, still waiting to hear back. Meanwhile, we'll look at what the stretch run might hold for the Mariners.

Bill Radke speaks with professor Sara Rankin of Seattle University and Scott Lindsay, former public safety advisor to the mayor of Seattle, about legislation being crafted that may aim to end ticketing of cars that double as residences for their owners, which is up to 40 percent of all homeless in the city. 

The Record: Wednesday, August 9, Full Show

Aug 9, 2017
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How nervous should you be about Seattle being in Kim Jong Un's nuclear sights? We'll talk with Washington state's ranking member of the U.S. House Armed Services Committee.

Also, should Seattle let people live in their cars, protected from parking tickets and vehicle impounds? That's the proposal, and we will debate it this hour.

And what does that former Google engineer's manifesto tell us about gender and diversity in our big tech companies?

Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke speaks with Slate tech writer April Glaser about the reasons that Google fired an engineer after he wrote a memo that questioned the ability of women to be successful in the tech industry. 

Poet Jamaica Baldwin
Courtesy of Stephen Lestat

In the immediate wake of President Trump's inauguration, Seattle poet Jamaica Baldwin wrote a series of poems, including "Vigilant," excerpted below.  KUOW's poetry correspondent Elizabeth Austen talks with The Record's Bill Radke about the ways the poem gives voice to an emotional reaction that is both larger than that single event and feels freshly relevant with each daily newscast. 

Bill Radke speaks with Shankar Narayan, technology and liberty director of the ACLU, and Ron Hosko, president of the Law Enforcement Legal Defense Fund, about sureveillance by Seattle Police.

A new City Council ordinance requires greater oversight from the public over what kind of technology used for surveillance can be used by law enforcement.

Narayan believes this is a great first step in creating more public trust and providing people with more privacy, though he would like to see it go even further. Hosko believes that this kind of public scrutiny weakens a police force's ability to strategize and less access to tech may strain resources.

The Burien City Council. (Back row) Councilmember Debi Wagner, Councilmember Austin Bell, Councilmember Stephen Armstrong, Councilmember Bob Edgar. (Front row) Mayor Lucy Krakowiak, Deputy Mayor Nancy Tosta, Councilmember Lauren Berkowitz.
Official photograph

Bill Radke talks with Craig Keller and Pedro Olguin about a Burien city ordinance meant to protect immigrants. The ordinance makes it illegal for city employees to ask residents about their immigration status.

On Monday, the Burien City Council voted to put Ordinance 651 up to a public vote this November.

The Record: Tuesday, August 8, Full Show

Aug 8, 2017
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KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Burien is a so-called sanctuary city, though there's no formal definition of that. Now Burien's policy is up for debate again. The city has decided to put it to the voter. You'll hear the arguments for and against being a local sanctuary city.

And you'll hear arguments for and against removing mountain goats form the Olympics. Move them? Shoot them? Contracept them? And why?

Mountain Goats are not native to the Olympic Peninsula. The Parks Service is deciding how to manage the population.
Flickr Photo/ld_germain (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/LM9e5

Bill Radke speaks with Rob Smith, the Northwest regional director of the National Parks Conservation Association, about the Olympic National Park's plan to either kill or relocate the estimated 625 non-native mountain goats in the park. The goats are seen as a hassle for hikers and a threat to native plant and animal life.

We also hear from Rachel Bjork, a board member with Northwest Animal Rights Network, about why she thinks the animals shouldn't be killed or moved. 

The National Parks Service will be taking public comment until September 26. You can fill out the survey at their site.

Phillip Chavira and Shontina Vernon
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Phillip Chavira, executive director of Intiman Theatre in Seattle, and Shontina Vernon, Seattle writer and musician, about what makes art inclusive.

The Record: Monday, August 7, Full Show

Aug 7, 2017
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KUOW Photo

Supervised heroin injection? Not in our city say Bellevue's elected leaders.

Also, who will survive the Seattle mayoral primary?

And can art be exclusive? Seattle Symphony, Pacific Northwest Ballet — are their performances for everyone or only a few?

Registered nurse Sammy Mullally holds a tray of supplies to be used by a drug addict at the Insite safe injection clinic in Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday May 11, 2011.
AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Darryl Dyck

Bill Radke speaks with Bellevue Mayor John Stokes about why the city is set to ban safe injection sites from the city. King County has said that it will create to sites where drugs users can go and safely use drugs under medical supervision. 

Marty Jackson
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell

Marty Jackson runs the Southeast Area Network of the Seattle Youth Violence Prevention Initiative. For years, she had worked with Stephan Stewart, trying to keep him off the streets.

And her efforts appeared to be working.


Bill Radke speaks with Eugene Volokh and Dr. Jim Sulton Jr. about race-based college admissions.

Washington state passed a law in 1998 that prevented colleges from using affirmative action. Sulton says that the law has harmed students of color by sending a message that they are not welcome, and that affirmative action allows for a more diverse campus.

Volokh argues that studies show affirmative action has harmed students of all races by shifting the focus away from education and creates divisions between different groups.

Volokh is a law school professor at UCLA and Sulton is the former executive director of the Higher Education Coordinating Board. 

Comedian Hari Kondabolu at the Museum Theatre in Chennai on January 5, 2012.
Flickr Photo/US Consulate Chennai (CC BY-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/b8hDHa

Bill Radke talks to comedians Liz Miele and Hari Kondabolu about representation and race in comedy. Is it okay to make fun of Anthony Scaramucci? What's the problem with the Simpson's character Apu?  

The Record: Thursday, August 3, Full Show

Aug 3, 2017
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KUOW Photo

If you voted in the Seattle mayoral election and your candidate lost, how do you make your voice heard now? Some of our guests this hour have big voices.

You'll also hear comedian Hari Kondabolu and his problem with Apu.

And you'll hear the big voices of two Seattle slam poets.

Elisa Chavez (left) and Ian Martinez (right) are slam poets in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke speaks with Ian Martinez and Elisa Chavez about identity and slam poetry. The duo are members of the Rain City Poetry Slam. They will be competing at the national slam poetry competition in Denver on August 12. 

Sunset from Gas Works Park, Seattle, August 3, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

There are more than 20 wildfires burning in British Columbia right now, but that’s just one reason why the air in Seattle is junk right now.

Bill Radke speaks with hydroplane drivers Brent Hall and Jerry Hopp about their love of racing. Hall speaks about his childhood dreams of being behind the wheel of a hydroplane and what it was like to start racing at the age of 36. Hopp talks about his long hydroplane career, racing for almost fifty years. And both of them explain some of the finer points of Seafair's most popular sport. 

Senator Patty Murray in the KUOW offices, Jan. 2016.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke talks to Sen. Patty Murray about the hearings she has planned with Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander. They hope to come up with a bipartisan fix to the Affordable Care Act. 

The Record: Wednesday, August 2, Full Show

Aug 2, 2017
KUOW control room studio record
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Seattle has chosen two candidates for mayor. We just don't for sure which two. King County voted on a sales tax for the arts. We'll hit the highlights of the primary vote and why it matters.

Also, President Trump today called for changing the U.S. immigration system to one that is merit-based. What does that mean? Who's trying it and what can we learn from them?

And you're going to meet two hydroplane drivers who are racing in Seafair this weekend. One is in his 70s and the other has pretty much gotten over his fear of water. Why do they do it and what's it like in that cockpit?

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