Author Interview
3:14 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

The Underlying Social Message Of Pranksters

Credit Kembrew McLeod's book, "Pranksters."

Ross Reynolds talks with Kembrew McLeod, a professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa, about his book, "Pranksters: Making Mischief in the Modern World."

McLeod argues that pranksters are more than mischief makers and entertainers. They have an underlying social message and prompt public discussion.

He recounts pranks going back four centuries including Benjamin Franklin and Seattle's own Megan Jaspers from Sub Pop Records.

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