Ross Reynolds | KUOW News and Information

Ross Reynolds

Executive Producer of Community Engagement

Year started with KUOW: 1987

Ross is responsible connecting with the community to find out ways that KUOW can help, beyond our on air and online services. He was co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record September 2013 to November 2015. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013. Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. In 1998, Ross became program director and news director. KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted the daily magazine program Seattle Afternoon; the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has participated in journalism fellowships which have taken him to Germany, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia.  In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways to Connect

Participants discussed Muslim cultures at KUOW studios at 'Ask A Muslim', Feb. 22, 2016.
Naomi Ishisaka

One reason we’re seeing such polarization in American society is that we’re not talking to each other. We’re wrapped up in our own cocoons and echo chambers.

In an effort to combat this, KUOW is launching a series of person-to-person conversation events we call 'Ask A __.'

Sydney Opera House

Artist Laurie Anderson has written six books, released a dozen albums, created multimedia performances for human and canine audiences and produced an acclaimed documentary film.

In 1992, on the occasion of her book Stories from the Nerve Bible, she talks with Ross Reynolds about her short stint as an art teacher ("I made up stories about artists"), why she made an American Express commercial, her thoughts on the then emerging internet, and how her first hit “O Superman” was appropriated for a car alarm company. 

People at a women's march on Seattle's Capitol Hill on Dec. 3.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

A new Republican president takes office. Half the nation is appalled.

But we're not talking about Donald Trump.


Leslie Brown, an activist with Edmonds Neighborhood Action Coalition, shouted into a bullhorn to rally dozens of protesters gathered outside the Edmonds PCC, January 29, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Sir Mix-A-Lot at work in his studio Sept. 8, 2003, in Auburn, Wash.
AP Photo/Jim Bryant

Sir Mix-a-lot was born Anthony Ray in Seattle on August 12, 1963. He was rapping in the early ’80s, and co-founded the Nastymix record label in 1983 with his DJ, Nasty Nes, who also hosted Seattle’s first hip-hop radio show.

Flickr Photo/US Embassy Canada/Steven Okazaki(CC by 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/cdXpME

In 1942 when Japanese-American citizens were sent to internment camps, University of Washington student Gordon Hirabayashi (1918 - 2012) openly defied the order.

He turned himself in to the FBI, was convicted for curfew violation and sentenced to 90 days in prison. He challenged the conviction all the way to the Supreme Court, which unanimously ruled against him in Hirabayashi v. United States in 1943.

Flickr photo/Franck Michel(CC by 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/gbreXU

Andrei Codrescu is a Romanian-American poet, novelist, essayist, screenwriter, and commentator for NPR. His droll reflections on America and the world delighted audiences with their humor and insight.

Codrescu spoke to KUOW’s Ross Reynolds in 1994 about his film "Road Scholar" a documentary about driving across America in a red Cadillac, encountering the devastation of Detroit and the remnants of the 1960s hippie culture.  

“America has this uncanny ability to sustain paradox," he said. "In Europe, we’d be tearing ourselves apart.”

NASA

In this 1989 interview, astronaut Buzz Aldrin frankly describes how his unstructured post-NASA life lead to  mental health issues and alcoholism.

LBJ Library (CC by 2.0)

In 1973 as Hank Aaron closed in on breaking Babe Ruth's home run record, he got 900,000 pieces of mail, much of it full of vicious racial hatred.

WTO protests in Seattle, November 30, 1999.
Flickr Photo/Steve Kaiser (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/c6kUo

In 1999 the World Trade Organization held it’s annual ministerial meeting in Seattle. President Clinton and other dignitaries came from around the world that November to advance the cause of free trade agreements.

But many people were skeptical. Street clashes shut down the opening meeting of the WTO ministerial conference on November 30. Here’s what KUOW sounded like on that day.


Author George Saunders.
Ross Reynolds

How do you talk to a Trump supporter? You may not know any Trump supporters. Or if you do, you don’t know how to have a conversation that doesn’t go off the rails.

Writer George Saunders shared some ideas with KUOW’s Ross Reynolds.


George Saunders at KUOW 2/28/17
Ross Reynolds

What happens when we die? Writer George Saunders speculates on what happens to Abraham Lincoln’s young son Willie when he dies in his first novel "Lincoln in the Bardo." Most of the book takes place in a cemetery and is described as having the ambience of Hieronymous Bosch and Tim Burton.

Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler
Flickr photo/Washington State Office of the Insurance Commissioner (CC BY-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/K52qFP

State Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler estimates one million people in Washington have received health care coverage under the Affordable Care Act, also called Obamacare.

He told KUOW's Ross Reynolds that without a plan in place from Republicans in Congress, those people could all lose insurance if Obamacare is repealed.


Author Daniel Dawes.
Brigitte Martin Mack

The Affordable Care Act will be seven years old this March if President-elect Trump and the Republican Congress haven't repealed it by then. 

Photos by Joan Marcus

David Byrne, rock star with the Talking Heads and member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, knew the stories of Imelda Marcos's thousands of pairs of shoes. But when he wrote a musical play about her life he left out the fact most people know about Marcos. Why did he chose her as the subject of his play?

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