Ross Reynolds | KUOW News and Information

Ross Reynolds

Executive Producer of Community Engagement

Year started with KUOW: 1987

Ross is responsible connecting with the community to find out ways that KUOW can help, beyond our on air and online services. He was co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record September 2013 to November 2015. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013. Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. In 1998, Ross became program director and news director. KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted the daily magazine program Seattle Afternoon; the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has participated in journalism fellowships which have taken him to Germany, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia.  In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways to Connect

Participants discussed Muslim cultures at KUOW studios at 'Ask A Muslim', Feb. 22, 2016.
Naomi Ishisaka

One reason we’re seeing such polarization in American society is that we’re not talking to each other. We’re wrapped up in our own cocoons and echo chambers.

In an effort to combat this, KUOW is launching a series of person-to-person conversation events we call 'Ask A __.'

Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler
Flickr photo/Washington State Office of the Insurance Commissioner (CC BY-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/K52qFP

State Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler estimates one million people in Washington have received health care coverage under the Affordable Care Act, also called Obamacare.

He told KUOW's Ross Reynolds that without a plan in place from Republicans in Congress, those people could all lose insurance if Obamacare is repealed.


Author Daniel Dawes.
Brigitte Martin Mack

The Affordable Care Act will be seven years old this March if President-elect Trump and the Republican Congress haven't repealed it by then. 

Photos by Joan Marcus

David Byrne, rock star with the Talking Heads and member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, knew the stories of Imelda Marcos's thousands of pairs of shoes. But when he wrote a musical play about her life he left out the fact most people know about Marcos. Why did he chose her as the subject of his play?

Cheryl Paysen looks at a screen displaying election results during the Washington State Republicans watch party Tuesday in Bellevue.
Daniel Berman for KUOW

It’s being called the most stunning victory in modern American history.

In January Donald J. Trump will take office as president of the United States. 

We’ve heard plenty from the politicians and the pundits. Now what do you have to say?

Peter Urban

Sherry Turkle writes “face to face conversation is the most human – and humanizing – thing we do.” Yet, Turkle says in contemporary society we’re seeing a flight from conversation to our phones where we get a constant feed of connection, information and entertainment. 

We provided bingo cards at our debate viewing party to add a little more excitement to the action.
KUOW/Lisa Wang

While Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were duking it out on Sunday night, you were watching.

Some of you were at a presidential debate-viewing party sponsored by KUOW and Humanities Washington at Naked City Brewery in Seattle's Greenwood neighborhood. (And if you weren't, you can always come to our last viewing party on October 19.)

Afterward, KUOW's Ross Reynolds gathered reactions from some of the people there, including Ryan Weber, Kate Zodrow and Satya (last name not given).


Paige Parsons

Ross Reynolds interviews Arlie Hochschild, professor of sociology at the University of California Berkeley, about her new book, “Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right", which has just been listed as a finalist for a 2016 National Book Award in Non-Fiction.

Hochschild spent five years among low income people in rural Louisiana in order to understand the conservative movement. 

Ross Reynolds, host, Knute Berger and Erica C. Barnett, both writers and Ron Sims, former King County executive.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Donald Trump officially became the Republican Party’s presidential nominee this week. We’ll recap the Republican National Convention and discuss comments made by Republican state party chair Susan Hutchison.

Susan Marie Conrad completed a solo kayak trip from Washington to Alaska in 2010.
Courtesy of Susan Marie Conrad

Ross Reynolds interviews Susan Conrad about her 1,200 mile solo kayak trip from Washington to Alaska. She recounts the 2010 trip in her new memoir, "Inside: One Woman’s Journey Through the Inside Passage."

A mourner is comforted during a memorial in Charleston, S.C., Friday, June 17, 2016 on the anniversary of the killing of nine black parishioners during bible study at Mother Emanuel AME Church.
AP Photo/Chuck Burton

Ross Reynolds talks with Rev. Carey Anderson about the one year anniversary of the mass shooting at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, SC. Anderson is senior minister at Seattle's First African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Kevin Kelly http://kk.org/portraits

Our machines are getting smarter at a mind-bending pace. Tech writer Kevin Kelly, founder and former executive editor at Wired Magazine (his job title now is Senior Maverick), attempts to chart the future in his new book "The Inevitable: Understanding The 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future."


The Oculus Rift virtual reality headset pictured in 2013.
Flickr Photo/Sergey Galyonkin (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/gwcD7s

Ross Reynolds interviews Sandy Cioffi, curator of the virtual reality festival SIFFX, within the Seattle International Film Festival. Cioffi describes the unique ability of VR productions to evoke empathy and emotion and explains how people who don't attend the festival can experience VR for themselves.

Some residents of the Jungle keep tidy encampments, like William Kowang above, while others live in garbage with needles strewn about.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

It's the beginning of the end for the sprawling homeless camp under Interstate 5 known as the Jungle. 

This week, officials from the city of Seattle and Washington state unveiled a plan to clear out and clean up the Jungle.

'Week in Review' panel Erica C. Barnett, Ross Reynolds, Gyasi Ross and Jonathan Martin.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ever heard of Seattle's 20-year plan? We discuss why you should care about it.  And what kind of hope should we have for the new approach to the homeless encampment known as the Jungle? Also, as Sound Transit move towards a light-rail future, are they spending too much on the opening day festivities? What does it mean for Washington state now that the Army Corps of Engineers has put a stop to a new deep water terminal in Cherry Point? 

Ross Reynolds talks over the week's news with writer Erica C. Barnett, columnist Jonathan Martin and lawyer and activist Gyasi Ross.  

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