Ross Reynolds

Executive Producer of Community Engagement

Year started with KUOW: 1987

Ross is responsible connecting with the community to find out ways that KUOW can help, beyond our on air and online services. He was co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record September 2013 to November 2015. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013. Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. In 1998, Ross became program director and news director. KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted the daily magazine program Seattle Afternoon; the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has participated in journalism fellowships which have taken him to Germany, the Kingdom of Tonga, Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia.  In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways to Connect

Some residents of the Jungle keep tidy encampments, like William Kowang above, while others live in garbage with needles strewn about.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

It's the beginning of the end for the sprawling homeless camp under Interstate 5 known as the Jungle. 

This week, officials from the city of Seattle and Washington state unveiled a plan to clear out and clean up the Jungle.

'Week in Review' panel Erica C. Barnett, Ross Reynolds, Gyasi Ross and Jonathan Martin.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ever heard of Seattle's 20-year plan? We discuss why you should care about it.  And what kind of hope should we have for the new approach to the homeless encampment known as the Jungle? Also, as Sound Transit move towards a light-rail future, are they spending too much on the opening day festivities? What does it mean for Washington state now that the Army Corps of Engineers has put a stop to a new deep water terminal in Cherry Point? 

Ross Reynolds talks over the week's news with writer Erica C. Barnett, columnist Jonathan Martin and lawyer and activist Gyasi Ross.  

Bill Buzenberg and Ross Reynolds
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Digital media and the World Wide Web have disrupted media, decimating the newspaper business and upending other legacy media outlets. After years of strong growth is digital disruption finally reaching public radio? Some question whether NPR can survive. Others feel the public radio collaboration between radio stations and the network is fraying.

In this interview recorded at Town Hall in Seattle, May 3, Ross Reynolds speaks with the former head of NPR news, Bill Buzenberg.

Sailing on Puget Sound
Flickr Photo/Eugene Kogan (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/ajF6Am

Olympia novelist Jim Lynch’s new book “Before the Wind” is about a Seattle family that builds, repairs and races a sail boat. They’re not blue-blazer yachtsmen; they’re the working class people who make and maintain the boats for the yachtsmen.

'Week in Review' panel Ross Reynolds, Claudia Balducci, Joni Balter and Rob McKenna.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Will the city come to a standstill with the viaduct closed? That isn't the only transportation story this week, we're also talking about Sound Transit 3.  And can you win an election without big donations? Why aren't more people furious about Troy Kelley? Plus, a round up of this week in pot. 

Ross Reynolds talks the week's news with former Attorney General Rob McKenna, Seattle Channel's Joni Balter and King County Councilmember Claudia Balducci. 

A statue of Russian revolutionary leader Vladimir Lenin in Seattle's Fremont neighborhood.
Flickr Photo/Martin Deutsch CC By-NC-ND-2.0 http://bit.ly/1MIuGBF

Washington state and Seattle have a reputation as left-leaning – most recently because of the election of Socialist city council member Kshama Sawant and our adoption of the $15 an hour minimum wage.

But our lefty reputation is older than that. (Exhibit A: statue of Russian revolutionary Vladimir Lenin in Fremont.)

Ross Reynolds interviews Mara Liasson at a KUOW event on March 31, 2016.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ross Reynolds interviews Mara Liasson, NPR’s national political correspondent. She’s covered presidential elections since 1992 and was  NPR's White House correspondent for all eight years of the Bill Clinton administration. In this conversation on March 31, she talks about the dilemma Donald Trump poses the Republican Party and the prospects of a showdown between Trump and Hillary Clinton for president.

Seattle.gov

On today's installment of StoryCorps from Seattle's New Holly neighborhood, Gerald Hankerson talks to Rachael DeCruz about the mental tricks he used to survive 22 years  in prison, many in solitary. Today Hankerson is president of both the NAACP's Seattle King County branch and the three-state conference overseeing Alaska, Oregon and Washington. This talk was recorded last summer in the StoryCorps booth. 

Stinging Nettles
Flickr Photo/J Brew (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4SPejs

Ross Reynolds interviews food writer Sara Dickerman about an early green offering in the farmers market: stinging nettles. They really do sting, but Dickerman explains how to handle them and make a delicious pesto that's distinctively different from basil pesto. You can pick them in the wild or get them at farmers market through May.

Georgette Magnin and Heather Pierce at the StoryCorps booth in New Holly.
Courtesy of StoryCorps

Georgette Magnin speaks with her decades-long friend Heather Pierce about Magnin meeting and proposing to her wife, and how life changed for her when her wife died. They recorded this talk last August at the StoryCorps booth in Seattle's New Holly neighborhood.

Audience members at the 'StoryCorps' listening party in New Holly on Feb 4., 2016.
KUOW Photo/Naomi Ishisaka

Last summer the StoryCorps booth set up in Seattle’s New Holly neighborhood. More than 250 people came by to record their conversations. 

WTO protests in Seattle, November 30, 1999.
Flickr Photo/Steve Kaiser (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/c6kUo

Ross Reynolds interviews novelist Sunil Yapa about his new debut novel "Your Heart is a Muscle the Size of a Fist," set during the tumultuous 1999 World Trade Organization demonstrations later known as the Battle in Seattle.

"When it happened, it was one of the really important moments in my life," Yapa said.

Web Exclusive: Listen to an extended version of the interview:


In 1987, Gerald Hankerson was wrongfully convicted of aggravated murder. After 22 years behind bars, Washington state Gov. Chris Gregoire commuted Hankerson’s life sentence. Hankerson was the first man in the history of the state to be freed after receiving a life sentence.  

Mary Lou and Kayla Balassone
Courtesy of 'StoryCorps'

Years ago Mary Lou Balassone decided to become a foster parent. She then adopted Kayla, 4, and her brother Dustin Balassone, 18 months. Mother and daughter sat down to talk about those early days of becoming a family – and Kayla learned something new about what Mary Lou did to keep them all together. 

Seattle City Hall
Flickr Photo/Daniel X. O'Neil (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1OGMTuh

Ross Reynolds asks former Seattle City Councilmember Nick Licata why the back cover of his book, “Becoming A Citizen Activist,” proclaims "you can fight city hall." Licata was in City Hall for 16 years.

Pages