Jason Pagano | KUOW News and Information

Jason Pagano

Senior Producer, The Record

Year started with KUOW: 2012

Jason Pagano heads up the team that produces KUOW's The Record and Week in Review. He's also produced KUOW's elections coverage, including profiles of all 47 people running in Seattle's 2015 city council primary. In 2017, he helped produce KUOW's coverage of the Amtrak Cascades 501 derailment that won a 2018 Edward R. Murrow Award.

Jason began his career as an intern on KUOW’s The Conversation. Before radio, he held editorial roles at Seattle alternative weekly The Stranger and Seattle PBS station KCTS.

Jason is a New Jersey native and graduate of Rutgers University. He lives in Seattle with his family.

Ways to Connect

Maria Cantwell
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Justice Anthony Kennedy is set to retire at the end of July. President Trump is expected to name his nominee next week, but Senator Maria Cantwell said the process shouldn't be rushed.

KUOW PHOTO/KARA MCDERMOTT

The debate over civil discourse reaches from a Virginia restaurant to the White House to a roommate-wanted ad for a Seattle house share. The Supreme Court wraps up its term with a string of conservative victories and a retirement that could influence the U.S. legal system for a generation. A $50 million cost overrun threatens the future of Seattle's streetcar.

FILE: Therese Macisaac of Seattle joins a protest against the travel ban outside the U.S. District Court of Appeals in Seattle in 2017.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld President Trump’s latest travel ban that barred people entering the U.S. from five majority Muslim countries as well as North Korea and Venezuela.

In the 5-4 decision, the majority opinion stated that the ban fell "squarely within the scope of Presidential authority.”

Ichiro Suzuki, special assistant to the chairman of the Seattle Mariners, donned a Bobby Valentine-style disguise and sneaked into the Seattle dugout to watch a bit of the action at Yankee Stadium.
AP Photo/Bill Kostroun

Ichiro Suzuki, the Carmen Sandiego of the Mariners, was spotted last week in the Seattle dugout serving a Super Mario Bros. inspired lewk. Fooling no one, the disguise raised more questions than it answered.


A young tyke uses a VR headset.
FLICKR PHOTO/Andri Koolme (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/FrZYUC

Bill Radke talks with Wired's Peter Rubin, author of "Future Presence: How Virtual Reality is Changing Human Connection, Intimacy, and the Limits of Ordinary Life."

Flickr Photo/Howard Ignatius (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/nZ4Mz1

In honor of the summer solstice, we asked listeners about their favorite summer songs. You came through with the nostalgic, the playful, and some truly excellent 80s throwbacks. 


Washington Governor Jay Inslee.
Facebook Photo/Governor Jay Inslee

Governor Jay Inslee announced that Washington state is suing the Trump Administration over the family separation policy. Ross Reynolds asked him what that means, when the policy seems to be changing daily.

"We have demonstrated time and time again that this rogue and chaotic administration needs to have the semblance of order and fairness and equity that is given to us by the protection of the judicial system," said Governor Inslee, referring to the state's other lawsuits.

kid tantrum
Flickr Photo/WickedVT (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/QjpMNk

Bill Radke talks with author Katherine Reynolds Lewis about her new book, "The Good News About Bad Behavior: Why Kids Are Less Disciplined Than Ever — And What to Do About It."

KUOW PHOTO/BOND HUBERMAN

Starbucks says goodbye Howard Schultz. Orcas Island says hello Oprah Winfrey. Google says we're done running political ads in Washington state, and Miss America says you don't have to wear a swimsuit to wear the crown.

Miss North Dakota Cara Mund is congratulated by contestants after being named Miss America during Miss America 2018 pageant, Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017, in Atlantic City, N.J.
AP Photo/Noah K. Murray

The Miss America contest announced it will ditch the swimsuit competition — and that future contestants won't be judged on their looks. Is that humanly possible?

KUOW Photo/ Brie Ripley

This week the Week In Review crew took the ferry across Puget Sound to record the show in front of a live audience at the Bainbridge Island Museum of Art. We talked about the region's growing pains and whether Jeff Bezos' idea to colonize space is a good one or not (spoiler, the crowd thought not). Also, how effective will Starbuck's racial bias training be and what the end of Roseanne means?

Homeless encampment along a road in the Sodo area of Seattle.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Bill Radke talks to Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan about the annual report out today showing a 4 percent increase in the number of homeless people in King County.

New biometric technology will match your face with your passport photo at airport customs. Is this a cause for celebration or concern?
Flickr Photo/Kat (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/6gTcVm

Assumptions about which passport line you belong in, the president's so-called Muslim ban, "random" screening that seems to target certain populations - airports are increasingly a frontier of ethnic and religious bias. Could we bypass some of those problems by taking the human element out of screening?

KUOW PHOTO/BOND HUBERMAN

Seahawks Russell Wilson and Doug Baldwin weigh in on the NFL's new policy for players who want to protest during the national anthem. Amazon and Starbucks kick in for an initiative to overturn Seattle's head tax on major businesses. A measure to impose new gun safety law gets a couple of million-dollar contributions. And a trip to Iowa fuels speculation of a presidential run for Governor Jay Inslee.

FLICKR PHOTO/boeke (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/nek1f

NFL owners have come up with a new policy for players who want to protest during the national anthem: Stay in the locker room while the anthem plays, or "stand and show respect" on the field.

KUOW PHOTO/BOND HUBERMAN

This week, Seattle passed a new head tax on businesses and learned that closing your Wells Fargo account is harder than it seems. The Supreme Court said states can decide for themselves whether to allow betting on sports. The Mariners lost all-star second-baseman Robinson Cano for half a season after he failed a drug test. And which is it: "laurel," or "yanni"? 

Seattle Mariners play at the Baltimore Orioles in 2013.
Flickr Photo/Keith Allison (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/foiSpC

Bill Radke talks to Tim Elfrink, managing editor of the Miami New Times, about performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) in baseball, after Seattle Mariners second baseman Robinson Cano was suspended for half a season for violating the MLB's drug policy. Elfrink broke the story of baseball's last big steroid scandal -- a South Florida wellness clinic that was supplying human growth hormone to major leaguers.

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Seattle's head tax debate gets down to the nitty gritty. Can the mayor bring business and the City Council on board? And with all the yelling about a head tax and homelessness, has Seattle become an angry city? And if we have, is it about time? Plus, Starbucks says no purchase required to use their bathroom and Google unveils an artificial intelligence robot that can schedule its own haircut appointment.

File photo of a homeless encampment under a bridge.
KUOW Photo

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan is not ready to support the proposed employee head tax. This is the proposal for a per-employee tax on the city's highest grossing businesses.

The money would pay for low-income housing and services for homeless people. Amazon would be the number one payer of this tax and they are so opposed to it that they've halted construction on a new tower in Downtown Seattle. Also opposed to this head tax are local companies like Starbucks, Alaska Airlines and Dick's Drive-In.

KUOW PHOTO/KARA MCDERMOTT

What happened this week? High home prices, taxes, homelessness and Amazon all collided in a debate over a proposed tax on Seattle employers, for one thing. And if you blinked you missed it, but Ichiro's playing career with the Mariners appears to be over.

KUOW PHOTO/BRIE RIPLEY

The Seattle City Council proposes a new tax on business to pay for homelessness, and Mayor Durkan says she wants a levy to pay for education. Are voters getting what was promised the last time they said yes?

Also this week: A judge says voters will decide the future of Washington's law on prosecuting police who use deadly force, Governor Inslee proclaims on HBO that Washington state has "the best weed in the United States," and Alaska Airlines says no more goats or frogs – but maybe pigs – allowed on its flights.

Bill Radke talks with brothers Aaron and Elmer Dixon, co-founders of the Seattle Chapter of the Black Panther Party.

If you buy from Amazon and worry about package theft, where do you send your stuff? One of those Amazon lockers? The mailroom at work? How about the trunk of your car? Starting today, Amazon Prime members in Seattle and 36 other cities can use Amazon Key In-Car to do just that. Geekwire's Todd Bishop explains.

Construction continues on a new apartment complex on Monday, March 12, 2018, at the intersection of Aurora Avenue North and 109th St., in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle has an affordability and housing problem, and the City Council is considering asking businesses to chip in. A proposal in the works would tax Seattle businesses with at least $20 million in taxable gross receipts 26 cents per employee for every hour they work.

The city estimates that an employee tax would raise about $75 million a year.

Should businesses pay more? We debate the pros and cons with Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien and Seattle Chamber of Commerce president and CEO Marilyn Strickland.

State lawmakers worked with police and community groups during the last legislative session to change the rules for prosecuting police who use deadly force. But it will be voters who decide whether those changes become law. On Friday, a Superior Court judge in Thurston County said lawmakers violated the state constitution, and put Initiative 940 on the November ballot. KUOW's Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins explains the situation with Ross Reynolds.

KUOW PHOTO/KARA MCDERMOTT

Starbucks apologizes for allegations of racial bias at a Philadelphia store. Former FBI director James Comey claims President Trump is "morally unfit" for the office. A Seattle City Councilmember tweets a controversial take on Barbara Bush. How do you want the Seahawks to treat their cheerleaders? And a sign on Interstate 5 told us what we all maybe needed to hear.

KUOW PHOTO/KARA MCDERMOTT

This week, KOMO anchors had to read a script written by their conservative bosses, Sinclair Broadcast Group.

Seattle considered several traffic solutions, including prescribing downtown drivers a traffic decongestant

And a UW researcher says bowhead whales are singing jazz.

The George Washington statue on the University of Washington Seattle campus.
Flickr Photo/Chris Blakeley (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1jEzCcs

Bill Radke talks to historian, author and former This American Life contributor Sarah Vowell about America's troubled history and how it can better help us understand today. 

KUOW PHOTO/KARA MCDERMOTT

This week, Seattle lost its Russian consulate, lost its “first in time” rental law, lost the Battery Street Park, lost everything... except the season opener. The Seattle Mariners won that, 2-1.

In this Jan. 29, 1962 file photo, the Spalding family, left, and the Richmond family demonstrate how people of the town would sit out a nuclear attack and its radioactive aftermath in Los Alamos, N.M., birthplace of the atomic and hydrogen bombs.
AP Photo, File

If you follow the news, you might get the impression that things are pretty bad.

Not just "why bother" bad. It's "throw your hands up" bad.

Or even "eat a large bag of Sour Patch Kids in one sitting because we're all doomed anyway" bad.

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