Jason Pagano | KUOW News and Information

Jason Pagano

Senior Producer, The Record

Year started with KUOW: 2012

Jason Pagano is a producer at KUOW, where he works behind the scenes to bring you interviews, news coverage and KUOW’s Week in Review. He’s also worked on KUOW’s Weekday and The Conversation. Before radio, he covered A&E at Seattle alternative weekly The Stranger, polished copy at a Philadelphia ad agency and hung about in a TV studio as much as he could at Seattle’s PBS station. Happy to be from New Jersey but living in Seattle, Jason is a graduate of Rutgers University.

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Students walked out of school over guns and Pennsylvania swung a Congressional district from red to blue. Will Washington state do the same in the upcoming midterms? Will you recognize the Seahawks next season? And does a dog deserve a seat on a Metro bus?


Ichiro Suzuki is back in a Seattle Mariners uniform, Amazon says it's figured out why its Echo smart speakers are spontaneously laughing out loud and state lawmakers finish up their work and go home.


It's not often a legislature passes a bill with bipartisan, supermajority support and the governor vetoes it anyway, but that's what happened this week. Maybe a statewide editorial page conniption had something to do with it. We'll recap the fight in Olympia over government transparency, tell you about some new gun laws and share an idea for how to bring back the Sonics with no new stadium, and no basketball.

Why do lawmakers want to exempt themselves from the state's Public Records Act? Why did they pass a bill to do that in just two days? Will Governor Inslee veto it? Why are newspapers across the state running front-page editorials saying he should? And how did we even get here?

Bill Radke gets answers from KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins.

Olympia Washington State Legislature
Flickr Photo/Harvey Barrison (CC BY-NC-ND)

How much right does the public have to pull back the curtain and see the communications of their state lawmakers?

Washington state has had a Public Records Act since 1972. News organizations love it. It’s how we find out the stuff that sometimes people would rather we didn't see. 


America's gun debate stretches from a Florida high school to the halls of the Washington state legislature. Speaking of Olympia, should WA legislators have to show us all their emails and texts? Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan warns of a budget deficit. The FBI comes to Seattle to discuss its number one unsolved case. And Jeff Bezos is part of a team building a clock deep inside a mountain that will keep time for ten thousand years.


We'll look back at this week's school shooting in Parkland, Florida.

Also, the College Republicans rally at the University of Washington raised questions over free speech on campus. Another question: Can a health club ban a white supremacist from training at their gym?

Is Washington state on the brink of abolishing the death penalty?

And could Hamilton possibly be as good as the hype?

The Winter Olympics are underway. Which event is the best? And why is sweeping better than vacuuming?


Does a $17,000 security fee infringe on free speech on the University of Washington campus? Is it "hostile architecture" when the city of Seattle uses fences and bike racks to keep people from camping in public areas? Did West Seattle homeowners pay enough of a cost for cutting down city-owned trees to enhance their views? And does Paul Allen play and sing as good as Jimi Hendrix? Quincy Jones thinks so.


The Amazon spheres: corporate hype or a Seattle icon to rival the Space Needle? We'll tell you what we learned from a behind-the-scenes look at the end of former Seattle mayor Ed Murray's career. And a controversial FBI memo is finally released -- we'll see what all the dossier is about. Also, would you pay $40 for custom Sasquatch license plates?


This week, an Amtrak engineer said he didn't see the signs telling him to slow down before last month's fatal derailment near Tacoma. Amazon opened a convenience store with no checkout lines. Sound Transit might lose a bunch of car-tab tax money. And Edgar Martinez might want to hit Hall of Fame voters with a light bat.

Seattle Emeralds, Seattle Eagles and yes, Seattle Kraken are only a few of the newly registered domain names that could hold clues about what a possible Seattle NHL team might be called. Bill Radke bounces some possibilities off VanLive reporter (and Canucks fan) Harrison Mooney.

Mary Haddish, 14, left, shops with her father, Daniel Ghebre at Amazon Go on Monday, January 22, 2018, on 7th Ave., in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Nobody likes to wait in line. So today, Amazon removed that unpleasantness from the neighborhood grocery store. At Amazon Go, you walk in, pick up your groceries and walk out.


This week, a woman revealed graphic details about her date with comedian Aziz Ansari, and it has women discussing reasons why they don't always say "hell no" and walk out the door.

Also, should a Seattle Congressmember attend the State of the Union address despite her opinion of President Trump? 

FLICKR PHOTO/sunrisesoup (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/CvLGNE

So Amazon won't be building HQ2 in Seattle. Honestly, it was a long shot. But where the company's second headquarters and its 100,000 jobs will go is still anybody's guess. Bill Radke talks with KUOW's Carolyn Adolph and Geekwire's Todd Bishop about the 20 cities that still have a shot.

Courtesy of Ann Dornfeld

For more than half an hour last Saturday, people thought Hawaii was about to be hit by a ballistic missile after officials mistakenly sent an alert that warned of an attack.


President Trump says a mouthful about immigration. Governor Inslee and the Democrats size up their new majority in Olympia. Seattle's new soda tax kicks in. Plus, a story about how the Seattle city government sausage is made, thanks to a special exemption for one Airbnb owner who fought city hall and won.

Deputy Chief Carmen Best, left, and Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole listen as mayor Jenny Durkan speaks during a press conference on Monday, December 4, 2017, at Seattle City Hall.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to The Seattle Times criminal justice reporter Steve Miletich about U.S. District Judge James Robart's ruling that found the Seattle Police Department was in full and effective compliance with the court ordered reforms. 


Bill Radke talks with Washington state Governor Jay Inslee about his plans for a carbon tax, President Trump's plans for our weed and offshore oil, a future White House run and more.


Bill Radke talks again with Fernmarie Rodriguez, nearly four months after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico and Fernmarie organized her own relief effort from her home in Bellevue.

David Sedaris, signing one of more than 8,000 tip-ins. This is the hard labor that goes into your signed author copy.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

David Sedaris was angry.

He was angry because he had to sign his name on 8,000 blank sheets of paper. He was angry because he already signs his name at readings all over the world — and now his publisher was making him sign his name on thousands of “tip-ins” to be bound into copies of his latest book. 


If you want to avoid a new tax on soda, load up now. You'll pay more when Seattle's new sugary drinks tax kicks in on January 1. Also new on New Year's Day: statewide paid sick leave and another upward tick in Seattle’s minimum-wage. 


You will laugh, you will cry, but you will mostly laugh along with actors Jane Lynch and Kate Flannery as they talk with Bill Radke about the Christmas songs we love and love to hate.

 Seattle mayor Jenny Durkan gives a rose to 4-year-old Araceli Cotto, after taking the oath of office on Tuesday, November 28, 2017, at the Ethiopian Community Center in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

It’s the first day of her new job. Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan reads her name on the door of her office at City Hall. What’s going through her head?

“It’s real. And the responsibility is enormous,” she told KUOW’s The Record.

Micrsoft technology
Flickr Photo/Fabien Lavocat (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/6FfQtk

Bill Radke talks to Geekwire's Todd Bishop about Microsoft's planned remodel of their building and what it says about the company's future in the region. 


Seattle mayor-elect Jenny Durkan assembles her transition team, and the City Council rejects a head tax on big Seattle businesses – for now. We'll cover the latest from City Hall as Durkan's swearing-in fast approaches.

Astronaut Scott Kelly has been in orbit longer than any other person in history.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Astronaut Scott Kelly has been in orbit longer than any other person in history: more than 500 days in total. During that time, he stockpiled lots of interesting information and experiences, some of which are included in his book, “Endurance: A Year in Space, a Lifetime of Discovery.”


Haven't voted yet? Your ballot is due on Tuesday. We'll catch you up on the latest election news with help from Seattle Channel's Joni Balter, KING 5 political reporter Natalie Brand and Q13 political analyst C.R. Douglas.

File photo of homeless ecampment under bridge.
KUOW Photo

Bill Radke talks to Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien about a proposed head tax that would require high earning businesses in Seattle to pay $100 per employee. The funds raised would go towards programs that help people experiencing homelessness.  


This week, some Seattle-area leaders told Amazon they'd like to hit the refresh button on their relationship with the company. Is Seattle going overboard with the apologizing? And what does Amazon owe Seattle for its success?