Hannah Burn

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2013

Hannah is a producer at KUOW. On a typical day, that means she reads many things, speedily punches in telephone numbers and asks lots of questions.

Hannah hails from Port Townsend for which she has an annoying amount of hometown affection. She started at KUOW as an intern in 2013. Before that she worked at a recruitment startup in Berlin, Germany, a design conference in Rhode Island and many coffee shops.

Hannah is a graduate of Brown University with a degree in organizational studies. 

Ways To Connect

Firefighters from Salem, Oregon, mop up hotspots on Judy Doran McBride's ranch near Twisp this weekend.
Courtesy Judy Doran McBride

Wildfire was roaring toward their 640-acre ranch near Twisp, but Judy Doran McBride and her husband stood their ground.

“If the fire comes our way, we’re going to stay and defend our home,” McBride told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman.

Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle Times reporter Will Drabold about his investigation into the Department of Social and Health Services which revealed issues in staffing and funding that put Washington kids at risk. 

Prison bars file photo.
Flickr Photo/Neil Conway (CC BY2.0)

A few years ago Theresa Nolte fell in love with Kelly Beard, an inmate at the Monroe Correctional Complex. Nolte was a prison staffer.

Consensual or not, sexual contact between prison staffers and inmates is illegal.

Ross Reynolds talks with Chris Devore, managing director of Techstars, about how Amazon can act like a startup even though it's really not one.

Employees at Ike's Pot Shop in Seattle's Central District sell marijuana products on their opening day, Sept. 30, 2014.
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

David Hyde talks with Associated Press journalist Kristen Wyatt about new lawsuits aimed to take down the legal pot industry.

The Undre Arms apartments: great or terrible name?
Flickr Photo/Paul Sableman (CC BY 2.0)

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Cal McAllister, founder of Wexley School for Girls advertising agency, about what makes a great, or terrible, apartment name. 

A Ballard man snaps a photo Monday night after a public meeting, as he mourns the loss of a tree, cut down recently by the city of Seattle.  The tree was on a vacant lot that may one day host a tent city for the homeless.
KUOW Photo/Feliks Banel

David Hyde talks with Ballard resident Jody Grage  about the proposed homeless encampment a few blocks from her house.

Marchers walk through the Central Area on Sunday night during a protest in support of Black Lives Matter. It was the anniversary of the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

People marching in a Black Lives Matter protest in Seattle on Sunday said they were upset by how a largely white crowd reacted to the disruption of Bernie Sanders’ rally the day before.

Shilo Murphy at the People's Harm Reduction Alliance in Seattle's University District.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

The day Shilo Murphy found his friend dead from an overdose, he resolved to change his life.

He wouldn’t quit drugs. He liked how heroin made him feel. But he wanted to improve the lives of drug users.

"My experience of having a close friend die was that I wasn't going to take it anymore,” Murphy told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds. “It being the conditions we lived under, the discrimination we felt, the constant violence towards us.”

Grapes before wine at the 2009 Indian Creek Harvest Fest in Kuna, Idaho.
Flickr Photo/Laura Gilmore (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

David Hyde talks with Alder Yarrow, founder of the wine blog  Vinography, about Idaho's prospects as a wine state.

Jeannie Yandel talks with New York Times writer Nick Wingfield about e-sports and their rise in Seattle. 

education kid school
Flickr Photo/jeweledlion (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Phil Talmadge, former Washington state Democratic legislator and former state justice, about the McCleary decision concerning education funding and how it's dividing government. 

Seattle Convention Center.
Flickr Photo/Dave Reid

Marcie Sillman talks with Visit Seattle CEO Tom Norwalk about the convention center expansion and how he believes it will benefit citizens. 

Single-family homes such as this one in Greenwood could be rezoned to become a multi-family dwelling should draft proposals by Seattle's affordable housing task force come to fruition.
Courtesy of Hana Sevcikova

Mayor Ed Murray’s decision to step back from proposal to increase density in Seattle’s single-family neighborhoods is a disappointment, says a woman who played a big role in developing the plan.

Faith Pettis, co-chair of Murray's Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda committee, told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds that some people misunderstood that part of a much larger plan.

Ross Reynolds talks with Carol Wagner, senior vice president for patient safety at the Washington State Hospital Association, about some of the infections patients contract at hospitals. 

Pages