Hannah Burn

Producer

Ways To Connect

File photo.
Flickr Photo/eutrophication&hypoxia (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with David Roberts, a blogger for Grist, about a clean fuel standard. 

Demonstrators in Seattle form a human chain around City Hall in support of a $15 minimum wage in April 2014.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Ross Reynolds talks with Harold Meyerson,  journalist and editor of The American Prospect, about the future of organized labor and Seattle's $15 minimum wage movement.

Garfield High School
Flickr Photo/Don Brubeck (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Jesse Hagopian, education reformer and Garfield High School history teacher, about the swift appointment of Larry Nyland as superintendent of Seattle Public Schools. We also hear from board president Sherry Carr.

Flickr Photo/Serena Epstein (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with senior Brookings Institution fellow, Jonathan Rauch, about how the gay rights movement compares to other social movements in the past.

Flickr Photo/GeekGirlCon

She was the nasal-voiced puppeteer behind Red Fraggle on Jim Henson’s Fraggle Rock, and she hung out with David Bowie on the set of Labyrinth.

homeless
Flickr Photo/~C4Chaos (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Once upon a time, Jeremy Bradford saw his life spread before him; years of infinite possibility.

The Seattle native had his life together. A successful stint in the Marines had led him to a sales career. Bradford was on an upward trajectory at one of the city's best-known department stores. 

United Methodist pastor Frank Schaefer speaks during a news conference Tuesday, June 24, 2014, at First United Methodist Church of Germantown in Philadelphia.
AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Ross Reynolds talks with Frank Schaefer, author of "Defrocked: How A Father's Act of Love Shook the United Methodist Church," about his decision to officiate his son's same-sex marriage and the ensuing case over his dismissal from position as pastor in the Methodist church.

This segment originally aired October 20, 2014.

Food compost.
Flickr Photo/szczel (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Karen May, program manager of King County's Food: Too Good To Waste program, about food waste. 

Century Link Field, Seattle.
Flickr Photo/John Seb Barber (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Dave Zirin, sports writer for The Nation, about how the recent federal raids to inspect illegal drug use are just one of many signs that the relationship between the federal government and professional football is changing.

Flickr Photo/Fabien Lavocat (CC BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with  Todd Bishop, co-founder of GeekWire, about Microsoft's fate in the sea of successful tech giants.

Courtesy Karin Huster

Marcie Sillman speaks with Seattle nurse Karin Huster, who is getting on a plane this weekend to fight Ebola in Sierra Leone. She previously was providing care in Liberia. As she prepared for this trip, Huster said the hardest part about leaving is not knowing what will happen. The Record will be following Huster's journey. She will be in Sierra Leone until December.

Flickr Photo/Shawn Campbell (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington philosopher Michael Blake about partyism and when it is and  isn't ok to discriminate based on political beliefs.

GeekGirlCon programming director Jennifer K. Stuller kicks-off a viewing of "Supergirl" at a 2013 event at Central Cinema.
Flickr Photo/GeekGirlCon (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Jennifer K. Stuller, local writer and a co-founder of Seattle's GeekGirlCon, about the Gamergate controversy and diversity in geek culture. 

Amazon.com logo
Flickr Photo/Guillermo Esteves (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Felix Salmon, financial commentator and senior editor for news network Fusion, about Seattle's e-commerce giant, Amazon, and what happens when one company makes it big time. 

Picture of a sculpture at the United Nations headquarters in New York City taken in 2010.
Flickr Photo/Sari Dennise (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Duke University political science professor Kristin Goss about what Washington's passage of universal background checks mean for the national conversation about guns.

Pages