Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

File Photo: Gender neutral toilet sign in London.
Flickr Photo/Cory Doctorow (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/qUDxsQ

Bill Radke talks with Betsy White about why she's opposed to a bill that would prevent people from using bathrooms and lockers rooms that are consistent with their gender identities. White, a Spokane resident, is the mother of an 8-year-old transgender girl.

'Week in Review' panel Gyasi Ross, Ron Sims, Jonathan Martin and KUOW's Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

How come America isn’t mocking Washington state as unrepresentative and irrelevant? Also, why do people of color favor Hillary Clinton? A pilotless car self-drives around Kirkland, is that our future? And what is the lesson of the shooting in the Jungle?

Bill Radke interprets this week’s news with former King County Executive Ron Sims, lawyer and activist Gyasi Ross, and Seattle Times editorial writer Jonathan Martin.

Bill Radke speaks with Darrion Sjoquist, a Starbucks barista and member of the labor group Working Washington, about why he and other workers are calling for Seattle City Council to regulate scheduling of shift work.

Nate Gibbs-Bowling of Lincoln High School in Tacoma, Washington won 2016 Washington Teacher of the Year.
YouTube

Bill Radke speaks with Tacoma teacher Nate Gibbs-Bowling about segregation in Washington state schools and how he wants to address this issue. Gibbs-Bowling writes about education inequity on his blog, "The Conversation I'm Tired Of Not Having."

Cosmic Crisp, near Quincy, Wash., on Sept. 18, 2013
Courtesy of Good Fruit Grower/TJ Mullinax

Bill Radke speaks with Washington State University apple researcher Kate Evans about Cosmic Crisp, a new variety of apple she helped develop that will be exclusively grown in Washington state. 

We asked our listeners to weigh in on their favorite varieties, check out their varied responses below!

A mural at the Pratt Fine Arts Center in the Central District of Seattle.
Flickr Photo/404era (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/98YbKR

Bill Radke speaks with Wyking Garrett about his vision to create an Africatown -- akin to a Chinatown or International District -- in Seattle. Garrett sees Africatown as a way to expand and preserve the African-American identity of Seattle's Central District. 

school classroom education
Flickr Photo/KT King (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8oTq2a

Bill Radke talks to Governor Jay Inslee about his proposal to raise teacher salaries in Washington state as a way of dealing with the teacher shortage. 

Canada's Great Bear Rainforest.
Flickr Photo/BC Gov Photos (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ubjonq

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a new deal to protect millions of acres of the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia.

Purple Heart
Flickr Photo/Phil Renaud (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ex7KSS

Bill Radke speaks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the resignation of Rep. Graham Hunt after allegations that the Washington state lawmaker exaggerated his military service record.

Also, Radke talks with Doug Sterner, a veteran who has spent decades investigating fraudulent claims of military service, for his take on why people distort, exaggerate, or lie about military service.

Vancouver, B.C,
Flickr Photo/Cliff Hellis (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/dxchD5

Bill Radke talks with CBC Radio pop culture columnist Kim Linekin about how The X-Files helped turn Vancouver, B.C. into a thriving hub for TV and film productions.

Donald Trump.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Bill Radke talks with Ralph Munro, Washington's former Secretary of State, about why he's distributing bumper stickers that say "Dump Trump." Munro is giving them away for free to anyone who wants one.

Google self driving car at the Computer History Museum.
Flickr Photo/Don DeBold (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/o7T6qb

In five years, self-driving cars will be on the road.

Let that sink in.

The Slants
Courtesy The Slants

In 2007 Portland bassist Simon Tam wanted to start a band that celebrates his Asian heritage, and he wanted a name that captured that pride and at the same time takes back a common racial slur.

Jennifer Hopper in KUOW's green room in 2014.
KUOW Photo/Akiko Oda

Bill Radke speaks with Eli Sanders, Pulitzer-prize winning author of "While The City Slept," about the attack on a hot summer night that changed three Seattle lives forever. On July 19, 2009, Isaiah Kalebu broke into the South Park home that Jennifer Hopper shared with her fiancée Teresa Butz. The man repeatedly stabbed and raped the two women. Butz died on the street in front of her home.

Also, Katy Sewall talks to Hopper about how she feels about having her name forever connected to that attack. For more from Hopper, check out another interview she did with KUOW in 2014. 

Eli Sanders and Jennifer Hopper will join KUOW's Marcie Sillman in conversation at Town Hall Seattle on Wednesday, Feb. 3 at 7:30 pm. More information on the event can be found here.

A construction crane working on a building is shown with Port of Seattle cranes in the background on a foggy summer day, Monday, July 15, 2014, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about why some people see a recession coming our way and what that could mean for the Seattle boom.

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