Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

In the early 1990s, Carmen Best was working as an accountant for a local insurance company when she saw a recruitment ad for the Seattle Police Department.

“I just wanted to do something different, try something out," she told Bill Radke. "Had no preconceived ideas about staying for a long time, or not staying, just thought I would give it a shot and see what happens.” 

The Hale-Bopp comet passes overhead on March 26, 1997.
Flickr Photo/Richard Dinda (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/aQBC9

You probably don't remember the passage of a comet named Hale-Bopp in the late 1990s. But you might remember what came after that. Glynn Washington, host of the podcast Snap Judgment, couldn't look away from that story. 

Is this the only type of love we should celebrate the week of February 14th?
Flickr Photo/Katy Stoddard (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/dTfeCY

This is the week of high-pressure dinner reservations, overpriced roses and, for the enterprising, discount chocolates on the 15th. Valentine's Day is upon us. 

Police officers form a line on Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018, outside of a College Republicans rally at Red Square on the University of Washington campus in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Seattle University communication professor Caitlin Carlson about the tension between protecting free speech on campus and protecting the rights of students, faculty and staff. 

Protesters crowd into the University of Washington's Red Square on Friday, January 20, 2017 during a speech by Breitbart editor Milo Yiannopoulos.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Last year the University of Washington's College Republicans invited former Breitbart editor Milo Yiannopoulos to campus. Yiannopoulos is a conservative and provocative speaker whose speeches and rallies often draw protests. The night he spoke at the University of Washington those protests turned violent.

This year when the College Republicans decided to hold a rally with the Patriot Prayer group, the university told them to pay a $17,000 security fee.

Limebike employees relocate bikes so that they're legally parked.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

There are five bike share companies operating in Dallas, Texas. And they all just got marching orders from the city: Find a way to clean up your products, or we'll impound them. 

The yes light is on.
Flickr Photo/Jeremy Brooks (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/prQbnr

University of Washington sociologist Pepper Schwartz says the takeaway from the allegations against Aziz Ansari is that we should talk about sex before having it. She sat down with Bill Radke to discuss why that is and some of the social programming that gets in the way.

Closeup of a peacock feather.
Flickr Photo/Gary Riley (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/ETAn4o

Last week's viral story of an ersatz emotional support peacock sent waves of hilarity ricocheting across the internet and late night talk shows. But The New York Times' David Leonhardt argues that the creeping normalization of little lies - such as falsehoods about our pets being support or service animals - has a corrosive effect on society over time. Was Dexter the peacock in the coal mine? Bill Radke spoke with Leonhardt to find out.

Dexter the peacock did not get to fly the friendly skies.
Photo courtesy Dexter the Peacock via Instagram screenshot/www.instagram.com/dexterthepeacock/

This week a woman and her peacock were turned away from a cross-country flight. She'd pleaded that Dexter was an emotional support animal, to no avail. And now the most regal road movie in existence is taking place as the pair drives to Los Angeles instead. But sneaking untrained animals onto planes and into restaurants is no snickering matter, and could soon be subject to civil penalties in Washington state.

Today on The Record we're looking at the #MeToo and Time's Up movements here in Washington state. How did we get here and what we can do next?

'The Legend of Bigfoot' is a store along Highway 101 in northern California.
Flickr Photo/Amit Patel (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/dAdW3o

Bigfoot might not be real, but he's a heck of a fundraiser. We are forever fascinated with that critter and now a Washington state senator wants to harness that fascination to help maintain Washington state parks. 

Amazon Spheres, downtown Seattle
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

If you've driven through South Lake Union in the last seven years, you have probably seen the structures emerge. Three round orbs made of steel and glass were filled with 40,000 plants from nearly 30 different countries to create an urban rainforest. 

Patricia Murphy / KUOW

Is Washington state going to put an end to capital punishment?

The death penalty has been on hold since 2014 when Governor Inslee declared a moratorium on executions.

Hear an update on what lawmakers are up to from Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins. 

First, KUOW's Patricia Murphy was a media witness at the execution of the last person to put to death by the state.

Casey Martin / KUOW

What kind of medical care would you want if you had Alzheimer's -- or dementia?

That's an uncomfortable question -- but you might be better off answering it now before dementia comes on.

Flickr Photo/ Carol Munro (CC BY-NC 2.0)/ https://flic.kr/p/7x2ngB

In the early, early hours of Tuesday morning phones lit up along the Washington coast alerting to the possibility of a tsunami. A 7.9 magnitude earthquake had just hit in the Gulf of Alaska.

The things is, not ALL the phones on the WA coast lit up. And as for that alert, it said there was a tsunami "watch" not a warning. Some people evacuated, some people didn't know whether they should.

This exposes a lot of questions about how ready we are for the big waves. The Seattle Times' science reporter Sandi Doughton explains what was learned after this latest tsunami warning.

Mortician Caitlin Doughty, with some tools of the trade.
Photo by Jeff Minton.

Let’s talk about death.

No, seriously. It’s time we all had a conversation with our loved ones about dying.

Author Ijeoma Oluo.
Photo by Nikki Closser, with permission of the author.

So, you want to talk about race.

But... do you? Reallllly? 

For most people, the real answer is no. 

Flickr Photo/Alex Holzknecht (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8E7xgJ

Seattle was recently named the most "hygge" city in the United States. Hygge is a way of life that has been imported from Denmark. It essentially means coziness.

To combat the long, dark nights of winter, a hygge practice would include lighting your fireplace, filling a room with candles, reading cuddled up in a blanket, spending time with friends, drinking lots of wine and eating lots of cake.

Statue in the Monumental Cemetery of Staglieno in Genoa, Italy.
Flickr Photo/Alexander Edward (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/atrV5j

Matt Calkins was in junior high when he first started feeling intense social anxiety.

"I remember I would go on high school debate trips and I wouldn't say a word for like three days until I was actually debating," he said, speaking with Bill Radke on KUOW's The Record.

Dancer Jon Boogz.
Photo courtesy of Marcie Sillman/marciesillman.com

One of them went viral in a collaboration with Yo Yo Ma; the other played Michael Jackson for the Cirque du Soleil. But you might know dancers Lil Buck and Jon Boogz best for their collaboration on the haunting video Color of Reality.

Amtrak 188 derailed in Philadelphia on May 12, 2015, killing 8 and injuring more than 200.
Flickr Photo/Jack Snell (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/e72hn7

Josh Gotbaum is used to helping people. He worked on disaster relief efforts in the Clinton administration, helped bring Hawaiian Airlines back from bankruptcy, and served as founding CEO of The September 11th Fund. But on May 12th, 2015, the helper became the helped when the train he was on came off the tracks.  

Aziz Ansari seen at Netflix original series "Master of None" ATAS panel at the Wolf Theater at Saban Media Center on Monday, June 05, 2017, in Los Angeles, CA.
(Photo by Eric Charbonneau/Invision for Netflix/AP Images)

Recent allegations against actor Aziz Ansari have launched a thousand thinkpieces. Depending on your point of view, this is either a death knell to the #metoo movement or just another link in patriarchy's mighty armor.

When local author Katie Anthony first heard the story, her kneejerk reaction was, "Really? That's just a bad date — we've all been on them." 

Future poet Kevin Craft with his parents, circa 1968. His poem "Matinee" explores the effects of feminism on his mother, himself, and his parents' marriage.
Courtesy of Kevin Craft

Set on the boardwalk at Ocean City, New Jersey, Kevin Craft's poem "Matinee" considers the trajectory of his mother's life, and its effect on his own.

Courtesy of Ann Dornfeld

For more than half an hour last Saturday, people thought Hawaii was about to be hit by a ballistic missile after officials mistakenly sent an alert that warned of an attack.

Flickr Photo/ sharkhats (CC BY-NC 2.0)/ https://flic.kr/p/qFaSB8

Bill Radke talks to aerospace and science editor for Geekwire, Alan Boyle, about some mysterious bursts of radio waves coming from three billion light-years away and what he explains what you should do if you find see bits of a space lab falling from the sky

Olympia Washington State Legislature
Flickr Photo/Harvey Barrison (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Washington state Sen. Schoesler (R-Ritzville), about issues that will arise in the state legislature in the 2018 session. 

Deputy Chief Carmen Best, left, and Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole listen as mayor Jenny Durkan speaks during a press conference on Monday, December 4, 2017, at Seattle City Hall.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to The Seattle Times criminal justice reporter Steve Miletich about U.S. District Judge James Robart's ruling that found the Seattle Police Department was in full and effective compliance with the court ordered reforms. 

Washington State Capitol
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Hayat Norimine, associate editor for Seattle Met's PubliCola, about a bill in the state legislature that would remove the statute of limitation on felony sex offenses. Right now victims in our state only have three years to pursue charges after a crime happens, or ten years if they reported the crime to the police in the first year after the crime was committed. This is one of the shortest statute of limitations for rape in the country. 

Shaun Scott (nametag misspelled)  and Hanna Brooks Olsen, holding the coffees they chose to buy instead of putting down payments on a home. Michael Hobbes has a policy of keeping his face off of the internet. Overhead sparkles are complete happenstance.
KUOW Photo/Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong

If you believe the New York Times, or watch CNN, or have read a thinkpiece between now and 2007 — you already know the bad news: The world is ending. Millennials, the generation born between 1982 and 2000, have arrived to ruin #allthethings, blanketing the landscape with a thick carpet of Snapchat filters, participation trophies, and avocado toast. What does this, the most entitled cohort to ever walk the earth, expect from life? It might not be what you think.

Department of Natural Resources estimates that the landslide volume is approximately 4 million cubic yards and covers an area of about 20 acres.
Washington State Department of Natural Resources

Bill Radke talks to David Montgomery, professor of geology at the University of Washington, about the crack in Rattlesnake Ridge and what geologist and state officials are looking for as they monitor the slow moving slide.  

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