Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

Bill Radke talks with Aaron Katz, who teaches health policy at the UW's School of Public Health, about his take on the American Health Care Act, what the new score from the Congressional Budget Office means for a potentially 23 million uninsured people and how Washington's failed health plan in the 90s can inform the future of health care in the country. 

Flickr Photo/Steven Santiago (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/q4dpg6

Bill Radke and Monica Guzman, co-founder of the Seattle newsletter The Evergrey, take calls from listeners about moving to Seattle, expectations vs. reality and the question of when do you become a local.  

Writer Kate Lebo
Heather Malcom

Bill Radke speaks with Kate Lebo about why she left her life in Seattle to move to Spokane. We all know new people are flooding into this area, but as all these people move in, who are the people moving out? 

Photo courtesy of The Fung Bros

The Fung Bros, Andrew and David Fung, have more than a million followers on their YouTube channel. (And yes, they're real biological brothers.) 

Bill Radke gets hooked up to the encephalophone.
KUOW Photo/Ann Kane

Bill Radke talks with Dr. Thomas Deuel, a musician, neuroscientist and inventor of the encephalophone, an instrument you play with your brainwaves. Deuel explains why he was inspired to create the instrument, how he feels it will help people with disabilities, and he even lets Bill strap it on. Listen until the end to hear Bill's brain play a solo.

'Passion in Red.'
CREDIT XANDRISS SINGLE LINE ARTIST HTTPS://FLIC.KR/P/N7B6V7 (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Claire Dederer’s book “Love and Trouble: A Midlife Reckoning” is a memoir. But unlike “Wild” or “Eat, Pray, Love,” it’s not the kind of memoir where a woman of a certain age goes traipsing off into the unknown to start a new life.


Parking in Seattle could become a thing of the past.
Flickr Photo/James Callan (CC BY NC SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4mBfBq

We know: It never feels like there are enough parking spots when you are driving around Seattle.

But there are more than you think. There are 500 million parking spaces in the U.S. – the same land area of Delaware and Rhode Island combined.

Snoqualmie Falls is waterfall on the Snoqualmie River between Snoqualmie and Fall City, Washington, USA. As featured in the opening credits of Twin Peaks.
Flickr Photo/Tjflex2 (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/TK9yay

Bill Radke talks to David Schmader, Seattle writer and author of the book "Weed: A User's Guide," and Leah Baltus, editor in chief of City Arts magazine, about the return of Twin Peaks, the show's impact on TV and culture, and how the new season lives up to the past two so far. 

Local Wonder bill radke
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

President Trump denies any connection between his campaign and Russian election hackers, but the Department of Justice appoints a former FBI director as special counselor just to make sure.

Remembering Chris Cornell: 'It's so devastating'

May 18, 2017
Chris Cornell performing in 2011.
Flickr Photo/Sebastian R. (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/cC1AXE

Bill Radke speaks with Charles R. Cross about the sudden, shocking suicide of Chris Cornell. Cross knew the Soundgarden and Audioslave frontman for decades, and he reflects on the massive impact Cornell had on Seattle and the world. He also discusses the circumstances surrounding Cornell's death and how fans and friends may be able to cope with the tragedy. 

Melissa Tizon is the widow of Alex Tizon.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

On the day that journalist Alex Tizon died, editors at The Atlantic decided to put his story, “My Family’s Slave” on the cover of the magazine. The story went viral, receiving praise and criticism.

President Donald Trump
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Bill Radke talks to Jill Dougherty, a distinguished visiting practitioner at the University of Washington Evans School and former CNN Russia correspondent and Moscow Bureau Chief, about the latest news from the White House regarding how President Trump handled classified information in his meeting with Russian officials. 

tained glass from Blessed Sacrament church in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Fr Lawrence Lew, O.P. (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/RD1oUp

Bill Radke speaks with Rod Dreher about his new book, "The Benedict Option: A Strategy for Christians in a Post-Christian Nation." Dreher shares his views on what could happen in America if Christianity fades away and how Christians should live to hold on to their religious identity. 

The dark side of moderating Facebook

May 15, 2017

Bill Radke spoke with UCLA assistant professor Sarah Roberts about the psychological risks of moderating social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Roberts describes some of the personal issues moderators have faced by viewing objectionable material. She also describes ways in which such a difficult job could possibly be made better. 

Would a universal basic income solve poverty?

May 12, 2017

Bill Radke talks with historian Rutger Bregman and author of the new book "Utopia for Realists." The book details, in part, Bregman's belief that there should be a universal basic income, where everyone is given enough money to put them above the poverty line, even if they don't work. Bregman believes this would solve multiple problems while costing a fraction of what is spent on poverty measures now. He also believes a basic income for everyone would allow people to rethink the true value of work. 

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