Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of Lily Loofbourow

Bill Radke talks with Lili Loofbourow, culture critic for The Week about The Myth of the Male Bumbler.

A person sleeps on a bench in a Seattle park.
Flickr Photo/mitchell haindfield (CC BY 2.0)/ flic.kr/p/rnqQho

Last week, Seattle’s leaders rejected a proposed head tax on big business, with the money going to pay for homeless services. But an investigation by the Puget Sound Business Journal found the homelessness crisis isn’t being driven by a lack of money — there’s more than $1 billion spent annually on services for the homeless.

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Seattle mayor-elect Jenny Durkan assembles her transition team, and the City Council rejects a head tax on big Seattle businesses – for now. We'll cover the latest from City Hall as Durkan's swearing-in fast approaches.

An empty classroom in Parrington Hall where Bangally Fatty was enrolled and taking a class is shown on the University of Washington campus on Thursday, November 16, 2017, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The University of Washington is facing a test of what it means to be a so-called sanctuary campus. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement has detained a UW student. He’s the first student detainee that the university knows about.

KUOW race and equity reporter Liz Jones reported the story; The Record host Bill Radke sat down with Liz to learn more.

Nathan Cultee dumps 16 farm-raised Atlantic salmon into a container on Tuesday, August 22, 2017, at Home Port Seafood in Bellingham.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Lynda Mapes, environment reporter for The Seattle Times, about where all of the nearly 100,000 escaped Atlantic salmon went and what lawmakers in Olympia plan to do about it. 

KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter


There’s one thing you can depend on every summer: Superhero movies will shoot straight to the top of the box office. The top three grossed $2.6 billion this year, illustrating how the popularity and profits of comic-book heroes have been on the rise recently.

Michael-Shawn Dugar, Seahawks reporter for Seattle PI.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Last Thursday’s Seahawks game was a great opportunity to practice up on some Greek vocabulary terms. Let’s start with “Pyrrhic victory.”

Bill Radke speaks with Erica Farrell, clinical manager for the Washington chapter of the Alzheimer's Association, about what we know and don't know about Alzheimer's and why she's optimistic an effective treatment can be found. 

The theater revised its number of seats down from 798 to 570. The seats are leather and offer enough leg room for an average size adult woman to fully extend her legs (claim tested).
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

Bill Radke talks to Dominique Cantwell, executive director of Bainbridge Performing Arts, and Warren Etheredge, curator of  Walla Walla Movie Crush and former programmer for the Seattle International Film Festival, about how they decide, as gatekeepers for arts organizations, when to cut ties with national artists who have been accused of assault and when to showcase their work. 

Flickr Photo/C. Jill Reed (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/4ohmf7

The massacre in Sutherland Springs last weekend was yet another moment in the painful parade of gun violence in America. This particular tragedy is also part of a long history of violence against religious sanctuaries, dating back to the Civil Rights movement and beyond.

Facebook
Flickr Photo/Franco Bouly (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/6rk2Qf

Bill Radke talks to Anna Lauren Hoffmann, associate professor at the University of Washington's Information School, about the implications of Facebook's idea to stop revenge porn and nude pictures from circulating on their site. 

A little girl looks over her father's shoulder at a smartphone.
Flickr Photo/Lynn Friedman (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/s29eap

How do old parenting dilemmas adapt to new technologies? Parents: when you’re raising kids in the technological age, how much wiggle room with screen time do you give them? How has your own tech use changed in response to what you want them to be doing? And … is it really tech time if everyone is playing with a sensor-enabled ball, but you’re all outside?

KUOW PHOTO/KARA MCDERMOTT

Haven't voted yet? Your ballot is due on Tuesday. We'll catch you up on the latest election news with help from Seattle Channel's Joni Balter, KING 5 political reporter Natalie Brand and Q13 political analyst C.R. Douglas.

Jessyn Farrell was a state legislator representing northeast Seattle. She was also a candidate for Seattle mayor.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

 


Jessyn Farrell wants to see a profound culture shift in Olympia.

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Do you ever come across an item — bottle caps, Styrofoam — you’re not sure you can recycle? Or did you read the story about China no longer accepting our recyclables and panic?

From left, James Marx, Carrie Howell, Robin Mueller and Haley Ballast write letters of support after a flier from the group Respect Washington circulated Burien, on Monday, October 30, 2017, in Burien.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to KUOW's immigration reporter Liz Jones about a letter that was mailed to some residents in Burien that listed the names and addresses of people who were accused of committing crimes and believed to be undocumented residents. 

Lindy West: 'I'm reclaiming the term witch hunt'

Oct 30, 2017
Author Lindy West lives in Seattle.
Photo by Jenny Jimenez / http://photojj.com

Lindy West knows what she wants men to do next. And it doesn’t involve making shameful public confessions or warning about possible “witch hunts” against powerful men.

KUOW PHOTO/ Kara McDermott

Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien is one of the lawmakers proposing to study the idea of tolling -- not just 520 or Highway 99, but Seattle surface streets, too. The new waterfront tunnel is going to have a toll. That toll will cause some drivers to spill onto our already-crowded surface streets and congestion pricing could help with that, but is it the only way to ease downtown traffic?

Lines of code
Flickr Photo/markus spiske (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/XLGzE5


Thinking of making a career switch? Maybe you should consider coding.

No, really — it’s not as hard as you probably think. That’s according to Cheri Allen, a software engineer and educator at the University of Washington and Unloop.

A box containing an order from Amazon.com is shown after it was delivered to a house in Etters, Pa, Wednesday, Sept 16, 2005.
AP Photo/John Zeedick

Bill Radke talks with Washington Post opinion columnist Christine Emba about Amazon Key, a new delivery service from Amazon that drops off packages inside customer's homes.

Emba's latest column in titled "Amazon Key is Silicon Valley at its most out of touch."

The homeless encampment known as the Jungle was he scene of a Jan. 26, 2016 shooting that killed two and wounded three.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke talks to Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien about a proposed head tax that would require high earning businesses in Seattle to pay $100 per employee. The funds raised would go towards programs that help people experiencing homelessness.  

Seattle is a city that’s been shaped by technology, from Boeing to Microsoft to Amazon. But there’s a new digital presence influencing how we see the city: poetry. The Seattle Poetic Grid is the culminating project of Claudia Castro Luna, in her role as the inaugural Seattle Civic poet. In conversation with The Record’s Bill Radke, she says it makes perfect sense for a poetic atlas to live in the world of ones and zeros.

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks with Mark Hallenbeck about a pay-by-mile approach to funding roads and bridges in Washington. The state is rolling out a pilot program in January where drivers would pay taxes on the miles they drive, instead of the gas they purchase.

Photo courtesy of YouTube


The ad against state Senate candidate Manka Dhingra might be funny if it wasn’t so telling.

“Hey, Eastside. It’s Seattle. We don’t have enough liberal politicians,” says a young woman wearing a “raise taxes” button.

“Do Seattle a solid. Send Manka Dhingra to the Senate,” says a bearded man wearing plaid.

“Manka Dhingra will give us free stuff. I love free stuff,” says a gray-haired woman dressed like a hippie.

Journalist David Neiwert
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

In the late 1970’s, David Neiwert was just getting his journalism career started. He worked at a small daily newspaper in Sand Point, Idaho, about 20 miles outside the Aryan Nations compound.

He had to figure out how the paper was going to cover the hate group.

KUOW PHOTO/KARA MCDERMOTT

This week, some Seattle-area leaders told Amazon they'd like to hit the refresh button on their relationship with the company. Is Seattle going overboard with the apologizing? And what does Amazon owe Seattle for its success?

Amazon confirmed a second and 'full equal' headquarters somewhere other than in the Puget Sound region.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks with KUOW reporters Joshua McNichols and Carolyn Adolph about the implications for cities hoping to land Amazon's second headquarters. McNichols and Adolph are co-hosts of KUOW's new podcast Prime(d).

Radke also talks with listeners about their advice to other cities hoping to reel in Amazon.

Colleen Echohawk, executive director of the Chief Seattle Club.
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell


Many Native people who are homeless in Seattle say they feel invisible.

“We are a city that’s named after a great chief of Suquamish-Duwamish descent, and we don’t always know and feel that in this city,” said Colleen Echohawk-Hayashi, executive director of the Chief Seattle Club. “I think that we have an issue where we don’t really want to engage in it.”

Courtesy of Washington Department of Transportation

Bill Radke speaks with Charlie Raines, director of the I-90 Wildlife Bridges Coalition, about the wildlife overpass that is being built east of Snoqualmie Pass on I-90.

NSF/LIGO/Sonoma State University/A. Simonnet

Bill Radke talks with astrophysicist Michael Landry about an historic collision of two neutron stars, known as a kilonova.

It's the first time scientists have observed this type of cosmic event both through electromagnetic and gravitational waves. Landry is head of the LIGO Hanford Observatory.

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