Bill Radke

Host, KUOW's Morning Newsmagazine

Bill Radke hosts KUOW's morning newsmagazine — as he did 20 years ago! Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s, and then he created Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. Next, Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report. He returned to Seattle in 2010, hosting on KIRO-FM for two years. And now he's back home.

When Bill isn't on the air he's a keynote speaker, husband of Sara and daddy of three.

Ways To Connect

Bill Radke and Joni Balter prep for a live broadcast of Week In Review at the Northgate Community Center on Friday, June 26, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

The city plans to make its neighborhoods denser AND keep them lovable. How? And: Is it wrong to expose a Seattle police ticket trap? How can our state government come unstuck? 

Bill Radke debates the week's news with former mayor Mike McGinn, former state GOP chair Chris Vance and Seattle Channel's Joni Balter.

Annie Roberts and her daughter Claire Engelhard said race relations, violence and affordable housing are the issues they are most concerned with in Central Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery


Bill Radke, Knute Berger, Chris Vance and Sen. Pramila Jayapal on stage at the Columbia City Theater on Friday, June 5, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Is it time for Washington state to abolish the death penalty? Should Seattle Mayor Ed Murray think twice about a trip to Israel? Is Southeast Seattle the next Ballard? And what is up with Republicans and golf?

Bill Radke debates these stories and more of the week's news with Crosscut's Knute Berger, state Sen. Pramila Jayapal and former Washington state GOP chair Chris Vance.

'Week in Review' kicked off its summer tour in the lovely Youngstown Cultural Arts Center in West Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

How will Seattle's new City Council districts change the way neighborhood interests are represented at City Hall? What do you learn when your run for office comes up short (by just a few signatures)? What's keeping state lawmakers from packing up and going home? And will a new ban on smoking in parks make Seattle a happier or more stressed-out place?

Bill Radke debates these stories and more of the week's news with former Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels, Seattle Channel host Joni Balter and Q13 political analyst C.R. Douglas.

This show was broadcast in front of a live audience from the Youngstown Cultural Arts Center in West Seattle as part of WIR's summer tour. 

The Solar Pioneer protest barge in Elliot Bay with the Shell oil drilling rig in the background.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Shell’s Arctic oil drilling plans, Seattle’s waterfront tunnel, the $15 minimum wage movement – are they all unstoppable? And if Washington state’s drought is unstoppableon the east side of the mountains and we have plenty of water on the west side, should you take as long a shower as you want?

Bill Radke debates the week’s news with LiveWire’s Luke Burbank, Republican Chris Vance and political blogger Erica C. Barnett.

Protesters buzz along the West Seattle shore as the Polar Pioneer is hauled toward the Port of Seattle's Terminal 5 on Thursday, March 14, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Shell Oil pulls into Elliott Bay, the University of Washington pulls out of coal and President Obama is pulled in two directions. KUOW's Bill Radke debates carbon and its alternatives with environmentalist Bill McKibben, Alaska North Slope Port Authority executive director Paul Fuhs and panelists Eli Sanders, Chris Vance and Joni Balter.

Plus: Should we ban smoking in Seattle parks? Do Washington legislators deserve a pay raise? And do Seattle "brogrammers" deserve blame for a changing Seattle?

Jim Willard, Juan Manel and Leobardo Magana worked to adjust irrigation systems for the short water year on a farm outside of Prosser, Wash.
KUOW PHOTO/ANNA KING

Bill Radke talks with reporter Anna King of the Northwest News Network about how farmers in Central Washington are struggling to save water during an extended drought.

A group of kayakers rafted together work to pull up a protest sign as they practice for an upcoming demonstration against Arctic oil drilling, in Elliott Bay on April 16, 2015.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

There was plenty of protests this week: Seattle's May Day riots, a fight to keep an Arctic oil rig out of Elliott Bay, teacher walk-outs over education funding and an uproar over a Seattle Seahawks player accused of domestic violence. 

Bill Radke debates this week’s symbols and substance with Todd Myers of the Washington Policy Center, Crosscut’s Knute Berger, and 'The C is For Crank' blogger Erica C. Barnett.

Baltimore protest, 4/28/2015, Freddie Gray
Flickr Photo/Arash Azizzada

Is a property damage as protest ever justifiable? Did Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant cross the line in criticizing a colleague? What will the Shell Arctic drilling protests accomplish? Bonus: Should Seattle PBS station KCTS pull its own plug?

Bill Radke discusses the week’s news with Tonya Mosley, Eli Sanders and Chris Vance. 

In this photo provided by Azim Afif a man approaches the scene after an avalanche triggered by a massive earthquake swept across Everest Base Camp, Nepal on Saturday, April 25, 2015.
Azim Afif via AP

Bill Radke talks with Kurt Hunter of Seattle's Madison Mountaineering. Their team of 15 climbers were near Mount Everest's Camp 2 when the earthquake struck, sending an avalanche that killed a base camp medic.

Cary Chin works at the front desk of Seattle-based Gravity Payments. CEO Dan Price told his employees this week that he was cutting his own salary and using company profits so they would each earn a base salary of $70,000.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

A Seattle CEO cuts his own pay so he can double his employees’ salaries – is this a new model for capitalism? Should Washington state tax the megarich? Does Woodland Park Zoo deserve a boycott?

Bill Radke hosts our weekly news debate with panelists C.R. Douglas of KCPQ13, former state Senate Majority Leader Bill Finkbeiner and Seattlish blogger Hanna Brooks Olsen.

Real Change Street Paper Goes Digital

Apr 16, 2015

Bill Radke speaks with Tim Harris, founding director of Real Change, about the newspaper's decision to offer a digital edition to readers.

People do better on tests of alertness and motor performance after power naps, says Dr. James Hamblin, health columnist at The Atlantic. But he says he's not a supporter of napping every day at work.
Flickr Photo/bark (CC BY 2.0)

This week an Alaska Airlines baggage handler fell asleep in the cargo hold of an airplane before takeoff, forcing an emergency landing at Sea-Tac Airport. (Nobody was hurt.) Should we take more naps at work? Bill Radke asked Dr. James Hamblin, senior editor and health columnist at The Atlantic.

Test pencil
Flickr Photo/mammal (CC-BY-NC-ND)

If you don’t like standardized tests, how should we assess our kids’ learning? Do we really want to ban all cell phone use in the car, or do we just say we do? And can a flotilla of kayaks block a giant oil derrick-pulling cargo carrier?

Bill Radke debates this week’s news with KIRO 7’s Essex Porter, Crosscut’s Knute Berger and Seattle Channel’s Joni Balter.

Restaurant check
Flickr Photo/Quinn Dombrowski (CC-BY-NC-ND)

With Seattle’s minimum wage rising, do you still need to tip? Who gains from Expedia’s move to Seattle? And in a Seattle road rage incident caught on tape, are you more like the driver or the cyclist?

Bill Radke debates the week’s news with Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant, Live Wire’s Luke Burbank, and Civic Cocktail’s Joni Balter.

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