Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

Tiny houses being erected at Othello Village in South Seattle.
Courtesy of Low Income Housing Institute

Tiny house villages in Seattle are meant to shelter people who are homeless. The small modular shelters offer a roof and a community. However, the city is currently being sued over a tiny house village planned for South Lake Union, and a Seattle Times investigation found that the Wallingford site had no case management for more than three months.

KUOW Photo/ Lisa Wang

Who will be Seattle's next police chief? Interim chief Carmen Best is back in the running after former Pittsburgh Police Chief Cameron McLay dropped out of the race.

And how dangerous is the City of Seattle really? Crime statistics and people’s perceptions tell two different stories. 

Seattle police officers observe marchers moving down 4th Avenue during the Black Lives Matter rally in Seattle, Saturday April 15, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

Seattle is down to the final three contenders for Seattle Police chief. Mayor Jenny Durkan has said she will announce the appointee this month.

Kyana Wheeler and Robin DiAngelo
KUOW Photo/Alison Bruzek

Robin DiAngelo has studied issues of racial and social justice and whiteness for decades. Her new book is, "White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism."

'The Legend of Bigfoot' is a store along Highway 101 in northern California.
Flickr Photo/Amit Patel (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/dAdW3o

How do you take a scientific approach to Sasquatch? Bill Radke talks to two scientists who have written field guides on the topic. Jeff Meldurm is a professor of anatomy and anthropology from Idaho State University and author of  Sasquatch Field Guide and David George Gordon is the author of The Sasquatch Seeker's Field Manual.

U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen of Washington state's 2nd District.
U.S. government

Bill Radke talks to Congressman Rick Larsen, who serves on the House Armed Services Committee, about why the NATO alliance is still relevant. He says the Baltic states need the alliance as protection from Russia and they need the U.S. to lead NATO.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is not here for your interrupting nonsense.
Flickr Photo/Stanford Law (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/fYkEXZ

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is known for her fiery written dissents. But she might have honed that talent, in part, because she couldn't get a word in edgewise.


Robots at the Science Museum
Flickr Photo/Paul Hudson (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/Vk7Zr3

Bill Radke talks to two roboticists about bringing robots into the home, deep into the sea, and out into space. We're joined by Sidd Srinivasa, professor in the Paul Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington, and Howard Chizeck, co-director of the UW Biorobotics Laboratory.

Bill Radke talks to Northwest News Network reporter Anna King about the wildfire that closed parts of I-90 this week and what people can do to prevent urban wildfires.

Single use plastic straws are optional to many, but can be critical for people with certain disabilities.
Flickr Photo/Horia Varlan (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/7vEzW1

Seattle's straw ban has coincided with hometown coffee chain Starbucks' decision to phase out all single-use plastic straws by 2020. The new sippy cup-esque lid is recyclable - but what it's not is accessible to folks with disabilities who rely on single use plastic straws.


President Donald Trump, accompanied by from left, Vice President Mike Pence, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt, and Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, speaks at EPA headquarters in Washington, March 28.
AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Bill Radke speaks with Leah Sottile, host of the Bundyville Podcast, about why President Donald Trump pardoned the two Oregon ranchers whose case sparked the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. 

Hands hold a DNA molecule whose bars have been formed into a cage.
Flickr Photo/thierry erhmann (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4i3QFK

Late last month, a federal judge in San Diego gave the Trump administration two weeks to reunite children under five with their parents, after immigration officials separated them at the border as part of a deterrence policy.

The problem? Records weren't kept, or in some cases had been destroyed. The solution, according to the administration: DNA testing of the children and their purported parents, which has many concerned about the ethical implications.

Newspapers in black and white
Flickr Photo/Jon S (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ayGkBN

Bill Radke talks to University of Washington Professors Jevin West and Carl Bergstrom. Together they teach a course at UW titled, "Calling bullshit: Data reasoning in a digital world." We first spoke to West when the class kicked off. Now they're back with how they're adjusting to fake news in social media and what they've learned from students, one year in.

FILE: Then-Deputy Chief Carmen Best smiles during a press conference on Monday, December 4, 2017, at Seattle City Hall. Best will be interim Seattle Police Chief.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke speaks with Crosscut's City Reporter David Kroman about the surprise reversal that placed Carmen Best back in as a finalist for Seattle's Chief of Police. She was initially not included among the finalist but that changed when one of the finalist, Cameron McLay, withdrew his application. McLay has agreed to take a different job with the Seattle Police Department assisting on reform efforts.

Key Arena is home court for Sue Bird, a 9 time WNBA All-Star
Seattle Storm

On Sunday night, Seattle Storm point guard Sue Bird smashed through the team's all-time leading scorer record. She put up 21 points against the Mystics. She's also the all-time assist leader for the WNBA. Bird spoke to Bill Radke about setting the new record and why she prefers making an assist to scoring a basket.

Hannah Gadsby in Nanette
Courtesy of Netflix/Ben King

Bill Radke talks about the Netflix stand-up comedy special, "Nanette," in which comic Hannah Gadsby says she's leaving comedy. "I built a career out of self-depreciation," she says, "And I don't want to do that anymore." We talk about comedy as resistance.

KUOW Photo/ Kara McDermott

There is a lot to feel guilty about this week. Fireworks on the 4th of July create pollution, Seahawks star Kam Chancellor reminds us that football is a life altering game for players and Amazon warehouse workers are peeing in bottles so they can keep working to hit their productivity targets. 

A clutch of barnacles waits to allure you this summer.
Flickr Photo/NOAA Photo Library (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/fUQNZx

Welcome to the beginning of Seattle summer! Don't worry if you didn't make trail and camping reservations months ago - Seattle has a lot to offer procrastinators.


Fuca Pillar at Cape Flattery, the northwest extremity of the Olympic Peninsula. Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, Washington.
Flickr Photo/NOAA Photo Library (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8D9zXL

Bill Radke talks to Jenny Waddell, research coordinator at the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary. She was on the exploration ship that went hunting for a meteorite on Monday. The team livestreamed the mission. It was the first ever to search for a meteorite in the ocean.

Jenny Durkan
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan joins Bill Radke in studio to answer listener questions. We talk about the education levy on the ballot this November, next year's budget, the streetcar delay, her fondness for the U.S. Navy Blue Angels, and the city's homelessness crisis.

Terrance Hayes.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

"In a second I'll tell you how little writing rescues." That promise, from the opening poem of Terrance Hayes' "American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin", is only partially kept. 

The poems in the book are in constant motion. They shuttle back and forth between Emmett Till and Maxine Waters, slavery and hip hop, the nation's future and the past it can't bear to look at. 

Mintwab Zemeadim, Rohena Khan, and Kamari Bright.
KUOW Photo/Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong

Now more than ever, many people's relationship with America is... complicated.

Three Seattle artists want to hear more about your relationship status with America. How would you describe it to your friends? (How do you describe it to yourself?)

Maria Cantwell
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Justice Anthony Kennedy is set to retire at the end of July. President Trump is expected to name his nominee next week, but Senator Maria Cantwell said the process shouldn't be rushed.

Canada flag American flag
Flickr Photo/Bruno Casonato (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/c1MdB

Bill Radke talks to Catherine Cullen, senior reporter covering politics and Parliment Hill in Ottawa for the CBC about the new tariffs Canada has put on U.S. products like steel, aluminum and strawberry jam. 

An illustration from a Scout.ai story.
Illustration by Cody Fitzgerald

Rumors of flying cars may have been greatly exaggerated, but the future is changing faster than our brains can keep up. Berit Anderson, CEO of Scout.ai, is trying to change that with a very ancient technology: stories.


Protesters occupy the sidewalk and into the street during the Solidarity Day protest outside of the Federal Detention Center in SeaTac.
Daniel Berman for KUOW

Bill Radke talks to our panelists about the 'Familes Belong Together' protests across the country over the weekend, including the rally at the SeaTac Federal Detention Center. We also discuss what the end of the Sasquatch music festival means for the city's arts scene, and if the City of Seattle's app should be used to report homeless encampments.

Display with system code.
Flickr Photo/Yuri Samoilov (CC BY 2.0)/https://bit.ly/2N9a7jN

Bill Radke talks to Stuart Reges, principal lecturer at the University of Washington's Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science about his essay, "Why Women Don't Code," saying women are underrepresented in computer science because of personal preferences. We're also joined by Nicole Buchanan, executive director of Ada Developers Academy.

In our conversation, Reges and Buchanan discuss what they see as the factors that do or do not lead women to go into computer science and tech, and the work they're both doing to bring women into the field and ensure they're supported.

File photo of the Supreme Court.
Flickr Photo/Mark Fischer

In a 5-4 ruling the Supreme Court decided that public sector workers don't have to pay a so-called "fair share fee" to the unions that represent them.

One of these sustainable straws might be in your future.
KUOW Photo/Brie Ripley

Nothing is more satisfying than the sweet sound of a straw - a pointy, plastic straw - piercing the seal on a tall cup of bubble tea. But after this weekend, that sound might be harder to come by. Seattle's ban on single use plastics goes into effect on July 1st.

Why the prohibition? How will it be implemented? And most importantly: what about the tea?? Kevin Kelly, general manager of Recology Cleanscapes in Georgetown, came by to help Bill Radke and producer Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong cope with change.

Eula Scott Bynoe and Jeannie Yandel
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

How much money do you make?

Turn and tell a coworker.

If you just cringed, you're like a lot of Americans when it comes to talking about salary at work. But that attitude is hurting us - especially women. KUOW's new podcast, Battle Tactics for Your Sexist Workplace, wants that to change.


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