Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke


Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

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Local Wonder bill radke
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

What do you do if you’re an anti-Trump Republican or anti-Hillary Democrat? Should you vote for a third party candidate?          

And this week the Brady Walkinshaw campaign released its first attack ad against opponent Pramila Jayapal in the 7th Congressional District race. After the ad was released Jayapal's campaign accused the ad of being racist and misogynistic. Was the ad “Trump-like?”

Bill Radke speaks with investigative journalist Stephanie Woodard about the shooting death of Renee Davis, a 23-year-old pregnant mother who was shot by King County Sheriff's Deputies during the course of a wellness check. Davis, who grew up on the Muckleshoot Reservation, had struggled with depression and was feeling suicidal.

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times environment reporter Lynda Mapes Thursday morning about the Dakota Access Pipeline protests. Mapes is on the scene in North Dakota where the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and hundreds of supporters are continuing a months-long protest against the construction of a pipeline. 

Police moved in on Thursday to disperse protesters who have moved the front line of their demonstration onto private land. 

Bill Radke speaks with Vancounver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about pollution coming from an American tug boat that ran aground in British Columbia a couple of weeks ago. The tug was pulling a fuel barge and while the fuel barge is fine, the tug is still stuck and it's leaking diesel. 

Bill Radke talks to Thaisa Way, professor of landscape architecture at the University of Washington, about the school's new Population Health Initiative. The University received a $210 million donation from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation this week for a new building on campus that will house the project. 

Should Seattle de-fund the police?

Oct 25, 2016
A march protesting the Seattle police shooting of Che Taylor on Feb. 21 moves through downtown Seattle on Feb. 25, 2016.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Bill Radke sits down with lawyer and activist Nikkita Oliver to discuss her stance on de-funding the police. Oliver feels that not only should money allocated to more officers be directed somewhere else, she also would like to see a society that doesn't have any cops at all. 

Kurt B. Reighley and Mark Mitchell together at the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Bill Radke speaks with Mark Mitchell and his partner Kurt B. Reighley about why they decided to move to Tucson after living in Seattle for 30 years.  Mitchell is a costume designer and artist, Reighley is DJ El Toro on KEXP.

Seattle's Hooverville, 1939
Courtesy of MOHAI, Seattle P-I Collection.

Bill Radke sits down with Crosscut's Knute Berger to talk about Hoovervilles, the shantytowns that sprang up during the Great Depression, and how they can inform our current debates over homelessness.

Seattle/King County Clinic at Key Arena will offer free health care to thousands of patients for four days.
Seattle Center Photo/Auston James

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Center's John Merner about a huge free health care clinic that's open in Seattle from Thursday, October 27, to Sunday, October 30. The clinic is set up in Key Arena and is expected to serve more than 4,000 patients who need medical, dental and vision care. 

The clinic is first come, first served with admission tickets handed out beginning at 5 a.m. each day. No ID or proof of residence is required for a patient to receive care. 

In this image from video, a body camera worn by Seattle police officer Chris Myers is shown on June 18, 2015 in Seattle.
AP Photo/Manuel Valdes

Bill Radke sits down with Seattle journalist McKenzie Funk, the author of the New York Times Magazine piece "Should We See Everything a Cop Sees?" It's an exhaustive look at the Seattle Police Department's difficulty outfitting every officer with a body camera. Funk explains the harm that can be done when everything is caught on film. 

housing: Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times columnist Jon Talton about a tax Vancouver, B.C. imposed on foreign real estate buyers and its impact on Seattle's housing market. 

KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Bill Radke talks with Bill Steele of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network at the University of Washington about how Washington state is unprepared for a large earthquake.

Last June, Washington held the Cascadia Rising earthquake response drill. A report in the wake of the drill found that Washington is unprepared. Steele explains what we should be doing individually and regionally before a major earthquake strikes.

Jill Stein is running for president as the Green Party candidate.
Flickr Photo/niXerKG (CC BY NC 2.0)/

Bill Radke speaks with The Nation contributor Joshua Holland and Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant about the merits of voting for Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein. Read why Sawant supports Jill Stein and why Holland thinks voting for Stein is a waste.  

'Week in Review' panel Sydney Brownstone, C.R. Douglas, Brier Dudley and Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Did Governor Jay Inslee and Bill Bryant change any minds during this week's gubernatorial debate? What are the arguments for and against spending $54 billion on Sound Transit 3? And this week, Seattle teachers, students and parents wore Black Lives Matter shirts to class - what did we learn? Finally, should presidential candidates be doing stand-up comedy?

A 2011 sketch by artist William at the Starbucks on Broadway, where Dr. Bob Hughes and Yoshiko Harden were spit on and called racist names.
Flickr Photo/William CC BY-ND 2.0

According to the 2010 census, Seattle is 69 percent white. That means, if you're reading this, you are most likely a white person. But is that how you see yourself in the world? Aren't you just a human being like everyone else?

That line of thinking is deeply rooted in racism, says Robin DiAngelo. She studies whiteness and co-developed the City of Seattle's Race and Social Justice Initiative Anti-Racism training with communities of color. She herself is white.