Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong | KUOW News and Information

Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2017

Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong is a producer on The Record. A multimedia storyteller and editor, she has lived and worked on five continents.

Most recently, Adwoa was IDEO's storytelling fellow; she also served as producer for The Alliance for Media Arts + Culture's HatchLabs. She has designed and implemented communications and outreach program at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Evidence for Policy Design at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, and for agricultural development projects with IFDC Nigeria.

As Community Engagement Fellow in Prose at Mills College from 2013-15, she designed and implemented a digital storytelling workshop for immigrant and refugee teen girls. In the same capacity, co-produced a student documentary series for KALW public radio. Adwoa holds a Master of Fine Arts from Mills College in Oakland and a Bachelor of Arts from New College of Florida in Sarasota. She is an alumna of the NextGeneration Radio and VONA fellowships.

The Seattle skyline, seen across the water.
Flickr Photo/Shelly Provost (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/VEhbc2

Essayist Elissa Washuta spent last summer in the Fremont Bridge. The old control room was turned into an office, which allowed her to sit over the water and write. Elissa is descended from the Cowlitz and Cascade people. The longer she looked at the shipping canal, the less she could separate it from the displacement of the Duwamish people in service of progress and growth.

Seattle is in a new wave of growth, with similar implications for those who were here before, including the Coast Salish peoples. On a visit back to Seattle from Columbus, Ohio, Elissa joined Bill Radke for a conversation on the flow of water – and people – in and out of this city.

Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, center, looks at election returns with staff during an election-night watch party at the RSA activity center, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala.
AP Photo/Brynn Anderson

Harvey Weinstein, Louis C.K., Charlie Rose, and others were swiftly fired after allegations against them broke. But Roy Moore came within 1.5 percent of being elected to the U.S. Senate. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas is still on the bench. And Donald Trump is still in the White House, as was Bill Clinton following his own transgressions.

When it comes to claims of sexual misconduct, why are media figures being held to a higher standard than public officials?

Early improvisational greats Elaine May and Mike Nichols.
Wikimedia

According to author Sam Wasson, it is. He sat down with Bill Radke to talk about his new book, "Improv Nation." The book explores what Wasson calls a great American art. Improv was founded by a social worker named Viola Spolin, who used it to help connect immigrant kids who didn’t share a language or culture. From there it gave us Nichols and May, Second City, and the early careers of many comic luminaries.

Cranberries make up a huge part of Pacific County's economy. The industry's workforce is being disrupted by immigration arrests and deportations.
Flickr Photo/Holly Ladd (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/5ypHND

Last month, Seattle Times reporter Nina Shapiro wrote a story about how immigrant neighbors were disappearing from Long Beach, a town in southwest Washington’s Pacific County. People were being detained and deported by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, often without ICE notifying law enforcement in the town.

A week after her story came out, Shapiro got a call saying an immigrant source she'd quoted anonymously had been arrested by immigration agents. When they picked him up, they said, “You’re the one from the newspaper.” Nina joined Bill Radke for a conversation about the hazards of immigration reporting in the age of Donald Trump.

Some of the microaggressions noted by KUOW listeners.
KUOW Illustration

Last week host Bill Radke sat down with Dr. Roberto Montenegro, a fellow in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry department at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Montenegro studies the physiological effects of racial microtraumas on long- and short term health.

In preparation for his visit, we asked our Facebook followers to share their experiences with microaggressions. Several commenters replied with stories from their own lives. Another listener, who identifies herself as a white woman, left several comments on other people’s posts telling them to stop stirring up drama or beating a dead horse. According to Montenegro in his return visit to the studio, this isn’t at all unusual.

Reporter, broadcaster, and author Dan Rather in the KUOW studios on December 8, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer


Dan Rather knows exactly what question he’d ask President Donald Trump in an interview: What are you so afraid of?

Rather told Bill Radke he’d start this way: “Mr. President, of what are you afraid? You have indicated by word and deed that you are very afraid of something."

present gift wrapped
Flickr Photo/Plastic_Bat (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/7m9UP1

This holiday season, let's all try to avoid being like Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout.

Remember her? The famed profligate from the Shel Silverstein poem who refused to take the garbage out? Let us refresh your memory.

ballot drop box ballot box
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

The election results were just certified -- and voter turnout was a historically low 37.1%. That shatters the previous low... of 38.5%, in the 2015 election. We went to vote by mail in 2011 to increase turnout. What gives? To find out, Bill Radke spoke with Christopher Mann, associate political science professor at Skidmore. Tl;dr? As its voting rate declines, Washington has lots of company across established democracies. Mann also mentions local media as one potential way to stop the slide.

Are you sure you're handing your keys to the valet?
Flickr Photo/Caitlin Regan (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/6AB68e

On the night of Dr. Roberto Montenegro’s dissertation defense celebration, he was at a fancy restaurant and feeling on top of the world — until a woman bypassed the valet stand and handed him her keys.

Bill Radke sits down with Kevin Young, archivist at the New York Public Library and author of the new book "Bunk." The book is a catalog of hoaxes, plagiarism and flimflam of all stripes. Young argues that there’s something uniquely American about hoaxes.

Author Isabel Allende in the KUOW studios on Tuesday, November 28th.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Host Bill Radke sat down with beloved author and philanthropist Isabel Allende. Her new book is "In the Midst of Winter." It touches on themes of love, loss and immigration in the winter of one's life.

She and Bill talked about those topics and more, including her grandfather's lessons on work ethic that she never forgot.

angry cat
Facebook Photo/Canopy Cat Rescue

Shaun Sears, owner of Canopy Cat Rescue, and his brother-in-law Tom Otto have rescued hundreds of cats from trees since launching their nonprofit in 2009.  

Sometimes they climb as high as 175 feet. 

Here are  some important tips they've gleaned from their climbs.


A person sleeps on a bench in a Seattle park.
Flickr Photo/mitchell haindfield (CC BY 2.0)/ flic.kr/p/rnqQho

Last week, Seattle’s leaders rejected a proposed head tax on big business, with the money going to pay for homeless services. But an investigation by the Puget Sound Business Journal found the homelessness crisis isn’t being driven by a lack of money — there’s more than $1 billion spent annually on services for the homeless.

An empty classroom in Parrington Hall where Bangally Fatty was enrolled and taking a class is shown on the University of Washington campus on Thursday, November 16, 2017, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The University of Washington is facing a test of what it means to be a so-called sanctuary campus. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement has detained a UW student. He’s the first student detainee that the university knows about.

KUOW race and equity reporter Liz Jones reported the story; The Record host Bill Radke sat down with Liz to learn more.

KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter


There’s one thing you can depend on every summer: Superhero movies will shoot straight to the top of the box office. The top three grossed $2.6 billion this year, illustrating how the popularity and profits of comic-book heroes have been on the rise recently.

Michael-Shawn Dugar, Seahawks reporter for Seattle PI.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Last Thursday’s Seahawks game was a great opportunity to practice up on some Greek vocabulary terms. Let’s start with “Pyrrhic victory.”

Flickr Photo/C. Jill Reed (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/4ohmf7

The massacre in Sutherland Springs last weekend was yet another moment in the painful parade of gun violence in America. This particular tragedy is also part of a long history of violence against religious sanctuaries, dating back to the Civil Rights movement and beyond.

A little girl looks over her father's shoulder at a smartphone.
Flickr Photo/Lynn Friedman (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/s29eap

How do old parenting dilemmas adapt to new technologies? Parents: when you’re raising kids in the technological age, how much wiggle room with screen time do you give them? How has your own tech use changed in response to what you want them to be doing? And … is it really tech time if everyone is playing with a sensor-enabled ball, but you’re all outside?

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Do you ever come across an item — bottle caps, Styrofoam — you’re not sure you can recycle? Or did you read the story about China no longer accepting our recyclables and panic?

Lines of code
Flickr Photo/markus spiske (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/XLGzE5


Thinking of making a career switch? Maybe you should consider coding.

No, really — it’s not as hard as you probably think. That’s according to Cheri Allen, a software engineer and educator at the University of Washington and Unloop.

Seattle is a city that’s been shaped by technology, from Boeing to Microsoft to Amazon. But there’s a new digital presence influencing how we see the city: poetry. The Seattle Poetic Grid is the culminating project of Claudia Castro Luna, in her role as the inaugural Seattle Civic poet. In conversation with The Record’s Bill Radke, she says it makes perfect sense for a poetic atlas to live in the world of ones and zeros.

Colleen Echohawk, executive director of the Chief Seattle Club.
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell


Many Native people who are homeless in Seattle say they feel invisible.

“We are a city that’s named after a great chief of Suquamish-Duwamish descent, and we don’t always know and feel that in this city,” said Colleen Echohawk-Hayashi, executive director of the Chief Seattle Club. “I think that we have an issue where we don’t really want to engage in it.”

Author Raj Patel said that, among other things, we don't pay enough for our food.
Flick Photo/Jo Ann Deasy (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/7E5ZEP


Seattle (or Amazon-town, if you prefer) is ground zero for cheap things. Amazon has built a world-altering business out of discounting products online.

 

And author Raj Patel says that’s not a good thing.

Zoë Quinn at IndieCade in 2015.
Flickr Photo/IndieCade (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/EzDYuD

Zoë Quinn is an avid gamer, developer, and artist. In her capacity as author and advocate, she’s launched an online crisis network and spoken before the UN.

But you probably know her best from #GamerGate.

Author Celeste Ng at KUOW in October, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Celeste Ng’s sophomore novel, "Little Fires Everywhere," is set in her hometown of Shaker Heights, Ohio. But she sees more than a few commonalities between her town and ours.

“Seattle, like Shaker Heights, tries to live with its eyes on the world,” Ng said, speaking with Bill Radke on KUOW's The Record

Small oily fish get no respect—but as climate change reshapes the food landscape and sustainable foods gain currency, it may be time to change the way we eat.

Driven by respect for the sea, Warner Lew is on a crusade to bring herring back to your dinner table.