Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong | KUOW News and Information

Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2017

Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong is a producer on The Record. A multimedia storyteller and editor, she has lived and worked on five continents.

Most recently, Adwoa was IDEO's storytelling fellow; she also served as producer for The Alliance for Media Arts + Culture's HatchLabs. She has designed and implemented communications and outreach program at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Evidence for Policy Design at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, and for agricultural development projects with IFDC Nigeria.

As Community Engagement Fellow in Prose at Mills College from 2013-15, she designed and implemented a digital storytelling workshop for immigrant and refugee teen girls. In the same capacity, co-produced a student documentary series for KALW public radio. Adwoa holds a Master of Fine Arts from Mills College in Oakland and a Bachelor of Arts from New College of Florida in Sarasota. She is an alumna of the NextGeneration Radio and VONA fellowships.

Facial recognition software has the potential to transform our surveillance ability: for better or for worse.
Flickr Photo/Sam Cox (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/S7S39Y

So you're walking down the street - probably not making eye contact with anyone, if you're from Seattle. But with Amazon's help, even if you're not looking at anyone, law enforcement might be looking at you.


Supreme Court SCOTUS
Flickr Photo/Kjetil-Ree (CC BY-NC-ND)/flic.kr/p/Hzv1u

The Notorious RBG was likely wearing her dissent collar this morning, as she issued a scathing rebuttal to the majority decision in today's case. At issue? A 5-4 ruling that upheld the ability of employers to force employees into individual arbitration. 


Sara Rankin, director of Seattle University's Homeless Rights Advocacy Project.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

One big question people have asked in the conversation about homelessness and affordability is: can we trust the city to spend this money effectively?


Cartoonist and speaker Vishavjit Singh.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

After 9/11, Vishavjit Singh experienced an uptick in discrimination. "Al Qaeda," people hissed as he passed them on the street.

"Terrorist."

"Go back to your country."

In this Oct. 5, 2009, a driver goes past a large condominium under construction in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Bill Radke looks at the debate over changing Seattle's zoning laws to allow for more apartments, condos and town homes, and fewer single-family houses. We're joined by Susanna Lin, a board member of Seattle Fair Growth, and Roger Valdez, director of Seattle For Growth.

Economist and former Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

'If you can't explain the economy in a language young people can understand, you are clueless yourself.'

So says former Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis, whose book "Talking to My Daugher About the Economy" is a testament to his own mastery of the subject. 

Scents and sensibility. Noses illustration.
Flickr Photo/7-3_resto-2 (CC BY 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/6DHoeH

Several weeks ago at KUOW, one of our colleagues placed anonymous notes in our work mailboxes. We used to have a scent-free policy, this person wrote. What would it take to bring that back?


Imani Sims is KUOW’s inaugural #NewsPoet – a program in which Pacific Northwest poets respond in verse to what the station airs. Below is an excerpt of her poem "Better than Captivity."


The DNA molecule is elegant, personal, and can give away a lot more secrets than it lets on.
Flickr Photo/Michał Kosmulski (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/BTfEMJ

The Golden State Killer’s arrest last week brought closure to victims and community members affected by a ten year spree of rapes and murder. The trail went cold in 1986, and it stayed that way until the FBI made a fake profile for the killer on a genealogy website. They used this to trace 500 partial matches, screen for 100 potential matches, and eventually narrow down to former police officer Joseph DeAngelo.

Rebecca Soffer and Gabi Birkner, cofounders of the Modern Loss website and coauthors of the eponymous book.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

How are you?

If you’ve lost a loved one, that may have conjured up memories of a heavy hand on your shoulder, a precisely angled head tilt, a Hallmark card with tulips in all white.

Beninese singer Angélique Kidjo.
Courtesy Sofia Sanchez and Mauro Mongiello

Beninese singer Angélique Kidjo’s career as a musician began at six years old, singing into the dark. 

But with her new cover of the Talking Heads’ classic album, she’s asking us all to "Remain in Light." She spoke to Bill Radke from Los Angeles to explain why she doesn’t believe in cultural appropriation – and why stupidity just might be the thing that connects us all.

Shielded by an identity-protecting tarp, a Seattle locksmith drills the locks on a Russian-owned consular building.
RT Twitter feed

Yesterday afternoon in Madison Park, you may have seen an unusual breaking and entering. U.S. State Department officials drilled through the locks on the gate of a Russian-owned home, while former consular employees filmed across the street.

An image from King County Metro Transit's anti-sexual harassment campaign, 'Report It to Stop It.'
Courtesy King County Metro Transit

Ridership is up on King Country Metro. Night bus services are up. And so are reports of sexual misconduct.

A view of the sky over Bertha the tunnel borer, whose efforts brought the SR-99 tunnel to life.
Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/yNcg1q

Let's say you owe me $20.

You decide that to pay me back, you'll set up a lemonade stand. There's about $50 in overhead: lemons, sugar. And don't forget wages for the younger siblings you'll be pressing into service to man the booth.

In the meantime, I decide to charge you $13 in interest. And suddenly, you find yourself needing to raise $100 to pay me that original $20.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.
Flickr Photo/Alessio Jacona (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/EixX1V

"Mr. Zuckerberg, would you be comfortable sharing with us the name of the hotel you stayed in last night?"

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg seemed taken aback by the question, but eventually stammered out a "No." That delivery was in marked contrast to the smooth admission that his data had been exposed to Cambridge Analytica, along with that of 87 million other Americans. Zuckerberg is the head of the world's most successful tech company - why does he seem to think about privacy differently if it's online?

Mary Ann Peters, "impossible monument (flotsam)" detail
Courtesy Mary Ann Peters

Last Saturday’s biological weapons attack in Syria set off yet another wave of involuntary migration. Lebanese-American artist Mary Ann Peters says that this water-based lingo isn’t an accident. 


The boom in Seattle's skyline has unintended consequences for the city's gender pay gap.
Flickr Photo/Michael (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/5GKvQy

April 11 was a rather unfortunate holiday: Equal Pay Day.

It's the day when a woman's salary catches up to what the average man earned in the previous calendar year. That amount of time is pretty reliably 15-16 months to a man's 12, and there are some surprising reasons for why the numbers have been so stubborn, says David Kroman in a piece for Crosscut.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.
Flickr Photo/Alessio Jacona (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/Du4kZU

In the wake of revelations that the data of 87 million users was exposed to political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will testify before Congress under oath.

A notoriously awkward public speaker, Zuckerberg’s primary battle may be to “stay on script while keeping his armpits dry,” writes Slate senior technology editor Will Oremus. He joined Marcie Sillman to discuss what we can expect from this week’s hearings, and what Facebook might be afraid of.

The cherry blossoms have emerged - and so has the artwork of Michael Spafford. The prolific painter has simultaneous shows in three galleries, and a book of his work has just come out. Artist, curator, and former Spafford student Barbara Earl Thomas joined Marcie Sillman to discuss why his work is such an important part of the local art landscape.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, turning his back on the camera as we might wish to turn our backs on his network.
Flickr Photo/Alessio Jacona (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/Du4fYm

#DeleteFacebook is trending right now… on Twitter. And that’s part of the problem, says Abby Ohlheiser. She reports on digital culture for the Washington Post, and says that while we wish we could kick our social network habits, the reality is much more complicated than it seems.

A woman walks past a large mural of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. on the side of a diner, painted by artist James Crespinel in the 1990's and later restored, along Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Tuesday, April 3, 2018, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Fifty years ago today, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was murdered on a balcony in Memphis, Tennessee. Decades later, a motion passed in the King County Council to rename the county for King, rather than a slave owner from Alabama. 

Seattle’s KOMO and other local affiliates were swept up in controversy after they were required to read a script written by the conservative Sinclair Media Group, which owns 200 local stations across the country. This Deadspin video captured the eerie repetition.

Dr. Tara Westover, author of the new memoir "Educated," at the KUOW studios on April 2nd, 2018.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Your views on politics, your understanding of history, your personal identity: You feel pretty solid about them, right? But what if you didn't? 

Standard Oil depicted as an octopus, parodying its status as a monopoly.
Public Domain

In 1890, the Sherman Act was passed. Its purpose was to preserve a competitive marketplace against potential consumer abuses.

But the law isn't supposed to punish "innocent monopoly," or monopoly achieved by merit alone. So the question is: how innocent is Amazon’s monopoly? 

Handing over the keys to a new rental property.
Flickr Photo/harry b (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/xSNB92

If you’ve rented a new apartment in Seattle in the last year, chances are that you ran into the first-in-time law. It required landlords to rent to the first qualified applicant. When enacted, the law was touted as a first in the nation attempt to protect tenants’ rights. Landlords argued that it overrode their property rights – and yesterday, a judge agreed. 

Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner displays a pen from the signing ceremony of Washington State's Equal Pay Opportunity Act.
KUOW Photo/Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong

Starbucks claims to have solved the thorny problem of pay equity. At least in their current workforce. At least in the US. And this isn’t a final announcement, just a milestone in an ongoing endeavor…

Closeup of a dictionary page.
Flickr Photo/Marcy Leigh (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/Q34Sfh

"Moist."

Did you get a little grossed out reading that? If so, you're not alone. Moist is one of the most hated words in the American English language. But why do we have such strong feelings about an ostensibly neutral word?

Which world would you rather be flying in? (The Astrovision one, clearly.)
Astrovision promotional materials

"When this movie's over, the audience will be halfway across the country."

This is not because they'll have fled the scene. Instead, it's an introduction to Astrovision, American Airlines' 1960s answer to other airlines' dominant single screen. It allowed individual film choice and a view of the skies - with consequences that ranged from the dangerous to the absurd. 

The Crab Nebula was one of the first objects that NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory examined with its sharp X-ray vision.
Flickr Photo/ NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/249nNXy

As an undergrad at MIT, Emily Levesque discovered the three largest stars in the known universe. She was drawn to the project because of a long-seeded fascination with black holes.

That inspiration came from a book she read when she was eight — “A Wrinkle in Time,” which has now been released as a grand production for the big screen.

File: Sherman Alexie reads from his book, 'Thunder Boy Jr.,' at the RED INK Indigenous Initiative for All at Arizona State University, Tempe, April 22, 2016.
Flickr Photo/ASU Department of English (CC BY 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/JmRvrM

Do you scoff when people say they support their local bookstores, but get their books on Amazon? Is supporting Woody Allen or R. Kelly any different? Katie Anthony says it can’t be. 

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