Bishop Scott Hayashi: 'Three men entered. One jumped behind the counter where I was standing, put a gun to my side and pulled the trigger. Pffft! It was that fast.' 
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Bishop Scott Hayashi: 'Three men entered. One jumped behind the counter where I was standing, put a gun to my side and pulled the trigger. Pffft! It was that fast.'
Credit: Courtesy of Kathy Shorr

Survivors of gun violence talk about how a fraction of a second changed their lives

To say the least, the statistics surrounding gun violence in the United States are disturbing. On an average day, 93 Americans are killed with guns. Seven of those are children.

For every person killed with guns, two more are injured.

Either by homicide, suicide or accident, over 33,000 people fall victim every year.

Perhaps if we thought more about what it’s like to be shot — how in a fraction of a second your life changes — and how difficult it is to recover, we could do more to address the problem.

Photographer Kathy Shorr’s new book of images and stories, “Shot: 101 Survivors of Gun Violence in America,” helps provoke that conversation.

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Shorr joined a panel of shooting survivors and KUOW’s Patricia Murphy in a discussion at Town Hall Seattle on May 18. Sonya Harris recorded the conversation.

Listen to the full version below: