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caption: A Dakota Access pipeline protester defies law enforcement officers who are trying to force them from a camp on private land in the path of pipeline construction, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016 near Cannon Ball, N.D.
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A Dakota Access pipeline protester defies law enforcement officers who are trying to force them from a camp on private land in the path of pipeline construction, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016 near Cannon Ball, N.D.
Credit: AP Photo/James MacPherson

Seattle Times reporter describes the scene at Standing Rock

Jeannie Yandel sits down with Seattle Times reporter Lynda Mapes to talk about the latest in the standoff over the construction of a proposed oil pipeline in North Dakota.

A piece of land where the proposed pipeline would be built is currently contested. Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners claims it owns the land, but the Standing Rock Sioux tribe cites a 1851 treaty to demonstrate that they own it.

Mapes was at the standoff this weekend and describes what took place and how it is difficult to predict what will happen next.

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