Weekday

No longer on air.

Weekday tracks the trends in society that become tomorrow's headlines.

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To find stories by Weekday older than October 15, 2012, go to www2.kuow.org and select "Weekday" from the show dropdown menu in the search function.

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Seattle Opera
9:00 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Providing Equal Health Care, Art Of Our City, And The Interfaith Amigos

Seattle Opera's audience seated in McCaw Hall are certainly awed by the "Ring" production, but probably can't imagine all the backstage work it requires.
Credit Flickr Photo/Felipe Fortes

Providing Equal Health Care
The Human Rights Campaign released its 2013 Healthcare Equality Index. The HEI is a survey of how health care facilities treat patients from the LGBT community. Both UW Medicine and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance were recognized for being  a “leader in LGBT health care equality." What does it mean to provide LGBT patient-centered care? Nicki McCraw, the assistant vice president of human resources for UW Medicine explains.  

Art Of Our City
This year could be the last time audiences see Seattle Opera’s current production of the Ring Cycle.  The four-part opera marathon is the story of Norse gods and goddesses, love and greed. The final opera, “Twilight of the Gods," ends with the destruction of the world as the gods and goddesses know it. What does it take to end the world?  Seattle Opera technical director Robert Schaub knows. He’s the man who helped turn the artistic vision into stage reality. Schaub took Marcie Sillman behind the scenes and then sat down to talk about theater magic.

The Interfaith Amigos On The Role Of Ritual
All of us have rituals we engage in.  Maybe you eat lunch at the same restaurant every day.  Maybe you celebrate the holidays each year in a similar manner.  How important is ritual to the human experience? The Interfaith Amigos muse on this subject.

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Canada, Culture, Commerce
10:00 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Canada, Culture And Commerce

Flickr Photo/Kevin Dooley



Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada, Everett Herald film critic Robert Horton looks at how rain is used in film and Michael Parks measures the global economic outlook, prospects for job growth in Washington and the latest moves by Amazon and Microsoft.

Summer Fruits
9:00 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Al-Jazeera America Comes To Seattle And Tips For Preserving Summer Fruits

Flickr Photo/Andrea Parrish-Geyer


Wildfires Continue To Burn Central WA
Two massive wildfires burning in central Washington have swallowed up nearly 132 square miles and forced the evacuation of hundreds of homes. The largest of the two wildfires is burning near Wenatchee. Last night, Kittitas County officials declared a state of emergency as the fire grew to over 92,000 square miles. The other major wildfire is burning near Goldendale in south-central Washington. We hear an update from Albert Kassel at the Washington State Department of Natural Resources.

Al-Jazeera America Launches In Seattle
Longtime KING 5 television reporter and anchor Allen Schauffler signed off this week, but not for good. Schauffler has joined the new Al-Jazeera America network as a correspondent based in Seattle. We talk with him about his time at KING and his new assignment with the cable news network.

Preserving The Fruit Of Summer
The fruit flavors of summer don’t linger too long. Paige Irwin and Amy Pennington share tips, tricks and recipes to keep fruits at your fingertips all year long.

Food Safety
10:00 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Imported Food Regulations, NCAA Changes And Greendays Gardening

Flickr Photo/Erik Torner

FDA To Regulate Imported Food
Imported foods have long avoided regulation by the Federal Drug Administration. That should all come to and end soon. The FDA has proposed a set of standards to ensure that food imported into the United States complies with standards met by American farms and food-processing plants. Personal injury and products liability attorney Bill Marler explains what the changes mean.

A New Day At The NCAA?
As we head into August, college football fans are rolling out their school colors. The University of Washington Huskies play their first game on August 31. The WSU Cougars play at Auburn on that same day. The anticipation is building for college football but things might soon be different. Sportswriter Art Thiel explains what could be changing as the organization governing college sports undergoes a potential sea change.

Greendays Gardening
Our expert gardening panel knows flowers, native plants and vegetables. Have a question? They offer guidance for your garden every Tuesday. Email your question to Weekday.

Wrongful Conviction Legislation
9:00 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Paying Exonerated Prisoners, Carter's Fight For Bae, And The Pope's Press Conference

Alan Northrop in May waiting outside the office of Gov. Jay Inslee before Inslee signed a measure that would allow people who have been wrongfully convicted to seek state compensation for the years they were imprisoned.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Compensating The Wrongfully Convicted
Imagine you’re wrongfully convicted of a violent crime and sent to prison. After many years, you’re exonerated by DNA evidence and released. When you leave prison, you get zero compensation from the state for the time you spent in jail. That used to be a probable scenario, but thanks to a new law that went into effect on Sunday, people wrongfully convicted of crimes are now allowed to file a claim for damages up to $50,000 against the state. We talk with Alan Northrop, who was convicted of rape, burglary and kidnapping in 1993 and exonerated and released from prison in 2010.

Former President Carter Plans North Korea Trip
Former President Jimmy Carter is reportedly planning a trip to North Korea. The White House confirmed Carter’s plans on Monday. He’s expected to try to win the release of Kenneth Bae, the Lynnwood man sentenced to 15 years of hard labor for “committing hostile acts” against the North Korean government. We talk with Professor Charles Armstrong of Columbia University about Kenneth Bae and the delicate dance of diplomacy with the North Korean regime.

The Pope's Performance Abroad
Pope Francis spent his first week abroad in Brazil. When asked about homosexual clergy, Francis said, "If someone is gay and he searches for the Lord and has good will, who am I to judge?" What did Francis reveal about his character and agenda during his travels? National Catholic Reporter's Jamie Mans  on and Father Paul Janowiak of Santa Clara University join us.

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

Psychological Science
10:00 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Protests In Egypt, Reflections On Being Human, And New State Laws

Jesse Bering's book "Why is the Penis Shaped Like That?"

Protests In Egypt
Supporters and opponents to former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi held rallies throughout Egypt on Friday. Tensions between the two sides have been escalating over the past month resulting in the death of over 100 people. We get an update on the situation in Egypt from Middle East correspondent for the Financial Times, Borzou Daragahi. We also talk with Maha Jashan, a local Egyptian-American, on how she’s been following the events in Egypt from Seattle. 

"Why Is The Penis Shaped Like That? And Other Reflections On Being Human"
Being human is very different than being a chimpanzee, or a bumble bee, or a rat. We think different, we act different, and we look different. Psychological scientist Jesse Bering explores what it means to be human by asking questions that are sometimes outside the realm of “polite conversation.” 

New State Laws On The Books
Starting today, it will be easier for the wrongly convicted to receive restitution for jail time served, people parking in electric vehicle charging stations will be fined if they aren’t plugged in, and bosses can no longer demand social media passwords from prospective employees. Everett Herald reporter and columnist Jerry Cornfield gives us an overview.

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Favorite Frozen Treats
9:00 am
Mon July 29, 2013

News From D.C., Bradley Manning, And Cold Treats

When it's hot, do you reach for a rich scoop of chocolate ice cream, or are you more of the kind that comes running for a popsicle with gumball eyes?
Flickr Photo/Cascadian Farm

News From D.C.
We preview the week ahead in Washington D.C. with CBS News Capitol Hill producer Jill Jackson.

Bradley Manning’s Court Martial Nears End
Overshadowed by the high-profile saga of NSA leaker Edward Snowden is the court-martial of Bradley Manning. The 25-year-old Army private is accused of leaking thousands of classified documents including nearly 250,000 diplomatic cables and a half million incident reports from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The defense has argued that Manning was a whistleblower. The prosecution has painted him as a traitor. Lawyers for both sides gave their closing arguments on Friday and a verdict is expected Tuesday evening. We talk with Ed Pilkington, who’s been covering the trial for The Guardian.

Milkshakes, Ice Cream And Other Frozen Treats
Like Pavlov's bell, the musical notes of an ice cream truck can trigger memories of bygone summers and bring the flavor of popsicles to your taste buds. The frozen treats of summer, be it a milkshake or snow cone, carry nostalgic memories. We want to know what your favorite summer treat is, what are your tastes of summer, and why? Email Weekday or call us at 206.543.5869.

Weekly Roundup
10:00 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Your Take On The News

It’s Friday—time to talk over the week’s news with Joni Balter, C.R. Douglas and Knute Berger. The Seattle mayor's race got real after Mayor Mike McGinn blocks a proposed Whole Foods Market in West Seattle over worker pay. The City of SeaTac put paid sick leave and a $15.00 hourly minimum wage on the fall ballot.  President Obama tried to pump up the country's economic hopes. And of course, Britain's royal baby arrived. What stories caught your attention? Share your thoughts with us by sending an email to Weekday

Local Music
9:00 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Tuition-Free College, Menthol Risks, And Music From Shelby Earl

Singer-songwriter Shelby Earl and her band.
From Shelby Earl's Facebook page.

Tuition-Free Washington?
Oregon’s Legislature has voted to commission a study that would explore the idea of “tuition-free” college. The “Pay It Forward” idea would allow students to attend college for free and then pay for their degree based on their salary post-graduation. It has been catching on with lawmakers around the country who are looking for solutions to the high interest rates on college loans. State Representative Larry Seaquist is considering a proposal for the next legislative session. He explains what it could mean for access to higher education in our state.

Scientific Review On Menthol Cigarettes
Menthol cigarettes are easier to start and harder to quit. That’s the takeaway from a new scientific review from the Food and Drug Administration. Although the FDA didn’t find evidence that menthol cigarettes are more toxic than regular cigarettes, the evidence shows that smokers of menthols develop stronger addictions and have a tougher time quitting. We hear more about the public health risk of menthol cigarettes from Sarah Ross-Viles of Public Health Seattle-King County.

Singer-Songwriter Shelby Earl
Singer-songwriter Shelby Earl has just released her second album “Swift Arrows.” She’s no stranger to the music industry, having spent 10 years working in it before she left her corporate job to write and record her own album. She stopped by Weekday to talk and play some tunes.

Weekend Weather Forecast
State climatologist Nick Bond brings us a weather forecast for the weekend.

Elections 2013
10:00 am
Thu July 25, 2013

School Board Elections, Susan Orlean, And Radio Retrospective

KUOW/Kara McDermott

Seattle School Board Elections
Six candidates are vying for two seats. The top 2 candidates in each district will advance to the general election in November. KUOW's education reporter Ann Dornfeld reports.

Writer Susan Orlean
Susan Orlean spends a lot of time working on her nonfiction. She spent ten years researching her most recent book “Rin Tin Tin.” What does it mean to devote yourself to a subject, almost to the point of obsession? We listen back to our conversation with Susan Orlean about her process and her passions.

Radio Retrospective: Radio Gets Involved In Hollywood
Last week, we looked at how Hollywood actors fared on the radio. Today we take a look at how radio adapted to the big screen. Movie stars often wandered off the mic during radio dramas because they were used to moving. Radio stars were the opposite. They were often too rigid, and had trouble working with props and delivering their lines simultaneously. Adapting radio scripts for feature length movies was another challenge. Did any radio-based skill succeed in film?

Recommended Eating
Food writer Sara Dickerman joins us with a lunch recommendation. Prefer to cook for yourself? She also has a pick for a great cookbook!

Pot, Boeing And Art
9:00 am
Thu July 25, 2013

DEA Raids Pot Dispensaries, Art Of Our City, Boeing, Losing Art Collections

Seattle Art Museum's collection is privately owned, unlike the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts. But it begs the question: What would Seattle look like without its cultural icons?
Flickr Photo/Alex Abboud and illustration by Kara McDermott

DEA Raids Puget Sound Pot Dispensaries
Federal drug enforcement agents raided marijuana dispensaries around Puget Sound on Wednesday afternoon. We’ll bring you the latest and speak with Alison Holcomb of the ACLU of Washington.

Art Of Our City: Precious Little
What are the limits of language? Sometimes we speak better when we communicate without traditional words or vocabularies. That’s one of the themes of Madeline George’s play “Precious Little.” It opens August 2 at Seattle’s Annex Theater. Director Katherine Karaus and cast members give us a taste of the play and talk about the role of language onstage and in life.

Update On Boeing
Boeing’s profit is up 13 percent, despite the troubles the company has been facing lately. The Boeing 787, 737 and 777 have all been in the headlines for fires and faulty landings. Boeing is looking for fixes to the problems as the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board continue to investigate the Asiana 214 crash in San Francisco, the 787 fire at Heathrow airport and the Southwest crash at LaGuardia. Christopher Drew, the Pentagon and aerospace reporter for the New York Times explains the latest news from Boeing.

What Does It Mean For A City To Lose Its Art Collection?
When the city of Detroit declared bankruptcy last week, creditors began to eye existing assets. One stood out: The art collection at the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts. Appraisers put its value at roughly $2.5 billion. But is it that easy to sell off a cultural collection to pay off a city’s debt? And what does it mean to a city to lose that cultural collection? Seattle Art Museum Director Kimerly Rorshach explains some of the intangibles when it comes to valuing art.

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Famous Duos
10:00 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Canada, Culture, And Commerce

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, Hollywood's most famous dancing duo.
From Wikipedia.


Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Then, film critic Robert Horton looks at some of Hollywood's most famous duos. Finally, Geekwire's Todd Bishop wraps up the news from the world of tech.

Skyrocketing Rent
9:00 am
Wed July 24, 2013

America's Economy, Seattle's Rents, And Nancy Pearl's Picks

Flickr Photo/Rennett Stowe


President Obama On The Economy 
President Obama is at Knox College in Illinois today to deliver the first of six speeches on the country's economy, part of an “economic conversation with Americans” over the next two months. While no new sweeping proposals are expected, the President does hope to gain public support ahead of fiscal deadlines coming in the fall. We talk with Peter Coy of Bloomberg Businessweek about what we can expect to hear.

Nancy Pearl Recommends
Book commentator Nancy Pearl stops by to recommend summer reading. She says readers should check out, "Winner of the National Book Award," by Jincy Willett. Also by Jincy Willett, "Jenny and the Jaws of Life," and "Amy Falls Down." Nancy also recommends "Americanah" by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.   

What's Raising Rents In Seattle?
Seattle has added nearly 2,000 apartments this year, but rents have gone up. The average renter in King and Snohomish counties now pays $1,190 dollars a month, a 5.8 percent increase over the past year. So what’s driving the skyrocketing rent prices? We talk with Glenn Crellin of the University of Washington’s Runstad Center For Real Estate Studies.

The Vitamin Myth
10:00 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Understanding Vitamins, Composer Lawrence Dillion, And Greendays

Flickr Photo/Lindsey Turner

Understanding The Vitamin Myth
There is often contradictory information about the health benefits of vitamins and supplements: take them, don’t take them, low vitamin D is tied to aging, Omega-3 might cause cancer. So how do doctors and nutritionists cipher through the different information to provide the best advice to patients? Dr. Calvin Kwan, clinical resident at Bastyr Center for Natural Health, and Mary Purdy, a registered dietitian with Seattle Healing Arts Center, explain when vitamins are and are not effective.

Composer Lawrence Dillion
The Seattle Chamber Music Society Summer Festival wraps up its 32nd season of performances in Benaroya Hall this week. Since 2007 the Society has premiered new pieces of chamber music through the efforts of its commissioning club. Club members pool together money to support the creation of work by leading American composers. This year’s piece, by composer Lawrence Dillon, premiered at the summer festival in Seattle on July 8. The composition “Sanctuary” is a musical musing for piano, horn and strings on the many meanings of the word. Dillon earned a doctorate in composition  from Juilliard in 1985. He was the youngest composer in the school’s  history ever to do so.  Dillon speaks with KUOW's Dave Beck and we'll hear recorded excerpts  from the premiere of “Sanctuary.”

Greendays Gardening
Our gardening panel includes a flower expert, native plant expert, and vegetable gardening expert. They answer your gardening questions every Tuesday.   

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Seattle Sports
9:00 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Mariner's Mid-Season Report, And Living With Parkinson's

Flickr Photo/David Grant

The M’s Mid-Season Report
Halfway through the major league baseball season, the Seattle Mariners have taken their fans on quite the wild ride. Long losing streaks, winning streaks and a whole bunch of injuries. But recently, there have been some glimmers of hope. Young players like Nick Franklin and Brad Miller have ignited the M’s offense. And Raul Ibanez is on the verge of breaking the record of hitting the most home runs by a 41-year-old. So what’s in store for the M’s the rest of this season? Larry Stone, who covers major league baseball for the Seattle Times, is here to discuss the rest of the season.

Living Well With Parkinson's
Medicine is making great advancements in the fight against Parkinson’s disease, even though there is still no cure. Advancements in gene therapy and a unique brain surgery are extending lives. But, it’s not just technology that’s helping patients, holistic medicine is also playing a role. A leading neurological researcher and one of her patients join us to share their story.

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

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