Weekday

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Weekday tracks the trends in society that become tomorrow's headlines.

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To find stories by Weekday older than October 15, 2012, go to www2.kuow.org and select "Weekday" from the show dropdown menu in the search function.

Composer ID: 
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Science and Nature
10:00 am
Mon April 29, 2013

The Big Bang, Brian Kimberling, And Less Work With More Rewards

Cover of "Snapper" by Brian Kimberling.

The Sound Of The Big Bang
What does the Big Bang sound like? That question inspired Dr. John Cramer, physicist at the University of Washington, to try and recreate the sound emanating through space after the Big Bang. Using data and a complex computer program, Dr. Cramer was able to synthesize a 100-second recording representing the first 760,000 years of the evolution of the universe.

Brian Kimberling: Author Of "Snapper"
In 13 connected tales, Brian Kimberling tells the story of Nathan Lochmueller, an aimless college grad who wanders through his early 20s and into the world of songbird research. Kimberling himself spent two years as a professional bird watcher in southern Indiana. He joins us to talk about his debut novel, "Snapper."

A Future Of Less Work With More Rewards
Traditional retirement may not be in the future for many workers, but neither is the notion of a 40-hour work week at unloved jobs. Planning for a transition to important but less time-consuming work is a growing business. It's creating new jobs and offering new pathways for people who plan on working well beyond the current retirement age.

Politics & Government
9:00 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Olympia, Human Trafficking, And Birds

The state capitol building.
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova

This Week In Olympia
With the end of the legislative session nigh, will lawmakers be able to wrap up their work or will there be a special session? Jerry Cornfield, reporter and political columnist for the Everett Herald, is waiting for answers along with the rest of us.

Breaking The Cycle Of Human Trafficking
In Kolkata, India’s red-light district, the New Light Foundation runs two centers that provide poor and abandoned girls with health care, meals, tutoring and in the case of 40 children, a roof over their head. Urmi Basu, founder and director of New Light, is now in the process of establishing a home for young boys so that they too can leave the red-light district.

The Beauty Of Endangered Birds
There are 590 bird species that are endangered or critically endangered. Some only live in captivity. Around the world there are places where only old nests and the memories of their songs remain. Photographer Tim Laman and ornithologist Ed Scholes bring us the story of endangered birds.

Pugel Regrets Video
11:26 am
Fri April 26, 2013

Seattle's Interim Police Chief Apologizes For 1986 Music Video Mocking Homeless

Seattle Interim Police Chief Jim Pugel
Courtesy/Seattle.gov

Seattle Interim Police Chief Jim Pugel says "I'll apologize for the rest of my life" for appearing in a department produced video showing officers mocking the city's homeless to the tune of a classic pop hit.

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News & Analysis
10:00 am
Fri April 26, 2013

Your Take On The News

Seattle's July 4th celebration over Lake Union
Flickr Photo/luisar

It’s Friday — time to review the week’s news with Knute Berger, Lynne Varner and Josh Feit. Topics this week include development in South Lake Union, George W. Bush and fireworks in Seattle. Our news panel cranes their necks for some perspective. What stories caught your attention this week? Call us at 206.543.5869 or send an email to weekday@kuow.org.

Social Issues
9:00 am
Fri April 26, 2013

Seattle's New Interim Police Chief, And Comedian Don Rickles

Comedian Don Rickles at onstage at The 2012 Comedy Awards in New York.
AP Photo/Charles Sykes

A Conversation With The Interim Seattle Police Chief Jim Pugel
Last year, there was extensive property damage during the May Day protests. A recent report cited a lack of a clear communication structure at the Seattle Police Department. Interim Chief Jim Pugel says this year there will be one commander in charge with very clear lines of communication.

Comedian Don Rickles
Don Rickles has been a stand-up comedian for more than 60 years. He’s worked with Clint Eastwood and Tom Hanks. He was a regular fixture on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, and he still appears on The Tonight Show With Jay Leno. He ribs Democrats and Republicans. He roasted Ronald Reagan at his inauguration. With Don Rickles, no one is safe.

Climate Change Could Bring More Vineyards To Washington
A recent analysis on the impacts of climate change had good news for prospective grape growers in Washington. Climatologist Nick Bond says there should be an overall increase in suitable habitat in western North America at higher elevations. That is as long as the forests and animals currently living there don’t mind.

Housing Development
10:00 am
Thu April 25, 2013

South Lake Union, Gun Control, And Our Miss Brooks

A skyline view from South Lake Union Park.
Flickr Photo/l.madhavan (CC BY-NC-ND)

The New Affordable Housing Requirements In South Lake Union
The Seattle City Council will require developers to put in some affordable housing in new South Lake Union residential towers, or pay for the city to build it. Developers are still deciding whether the requirement will make taller buildings in the neighborhood economically feasible.

Politics Is A Fighting Word
In Olympia, stronger laws regarding gun control couldn’t get past the opposition from state Senate leadership. What will citizens who support gun control do now? Eric Liu lobbied in Olympia for stronger gun control rules in Washington state.

Radio Retrospective: Gloria McMillan From Our Miss Brooks
Our Miss Brooks starring Eve Arden was a popular comedy show during radio’s golden age. Gloria McMillan was a teenager when she played Harriet on the show. She shares her insider take on the cast, Hollywood and what it was like to work in radio.

A Lunch Recommendation
Food writer Sara Dickerman recommends Pestle Rock Isan Thai Cuisine this week. It's a Thai restaurant in Ballard with bright and spicy, salads and delicious young coconut juice. You can read her recommendation for the the best hotels for food lovers in Bon Appetite.

Arts & Entertainment
9:00 am
Thu April 25, 2013

Electric Cars, Isabel Allende, And President Obama's Sister

Cover of "Maya's Notebook" by Isabel Allende.

Electric Car Company Under Congressional Scrutiny
Fisker Automotive is the latest beneficiary of the Obama Administration’s push for renewable energy to flounder. The electric car startup recently fired 75 percent of its workforce and hired bankruptcy advisers. Congress is asking questions about the propriety of federal loans to the politically well-connected company.

A Conversation With Writer Isabel Allende
Isabel Allende is a world-renowned writer, with 19 books in 35 languages. Her latest is "Maya’s Notebook," a tale that revolves around a descent into addiction and a rebirth through the love of family and place.

A Conversation With President Obama’s Sister, Maya Saetoro-Ng
A famous sibling can be a blessing or a burden. Maya Saetoro-Ng is the half-sister of President Obama. She uses her perspective as a history teacher to analyze how her brother’s presidency will be remembered.

Seattle Theater’s Power Couple
Seattle theater audiences know R. Hamilton “Bob” Wright from his long career onstage acting and of late, directing. Wright’s wife, Katie Forgette, is also a fixture on Seattle stages as an actress and now a playwright. Forgette’s newest play has opened at ACT Theatre directed by husband Bob Wright.

News
10:00 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Canada, Culture And Commerce

Canadian flag.
Flickr Photo/Christopher Policarpio

Tolling Proposed At The Canadian Border
The United States is considering tolling Canadians crossing the border. Vaughn Palmer of Vancouver Sun says there are already “fulminations on both sides of the border.”  

Let’s Hit The Road
Road films are about movement and change. Two new road movies end up in a surprising place. Some classic road movies take the viewer back home again.
 
All Roads Lead To The Arena District
Maybe the road leads to an entertainment district. That’s what Chris Hansen wants for Sodo. The Seattle Times' Jon Talton walks us through the concept. 

Politic and Government
9:00 am
Wed April 24, 2013

New Port Commissioner, The Emanuel Family, And Washington State Constitution

Cover of 'The Washington State Constitution' by Robert Utter and Hugh Spitzer.

The Port Of Seattle Has A New Commissioner
Stephanie Bowman has been selected to join the Seattle Port, filling the seat Rob Holland vacated.  Last month, Courtney Gregoire was picked to replace Gael Tarleton. President of the Port of Seattle Commission Tom Albro explains why these two were selected out of the 35 applicants.

Inside The Emanuel Family
Ezekiel Emanuel and his two brothers Rahm and Ari grew up to become powerhouses in their respective careers. Rahm is the mayor of Chicago, Ari is a successful Hollywood agent and Ezekiel is the head of the department of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania. In his new memoir "Brothers Emanuel: A Memoir of An American Family," Ezekiel tells the story of his family's history — from his parents early life as political and civil rights activists to the family's modern day successes.

Following The Old Rules
The Washington State Constitution is a 19th century document rooted in populist traditions from the era. It still functions today, but there have been significant changes. Over the past decade, state courts have come to rely on the state’s constitutional rather than federal doctrines. This is especially true in the area of individual rights, according to Hugh Spitzer, Constitutional scholar and co-author of the book, "The Washington State Constitution."

Social Issues
10:00 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Bellevue SWAT, Japanese Farm Food, And Greendays Gardening

What principles do you incorporate in your gardening?
Flickr Photo/Steve Wilson

Bellevue’s SWAT Team Comes To A Seattle Neighborhood
Columbia City residents heard Monday night from Seattle and Bellevue officials about a shooting involving Bellevue police that happened in Seattle late last month. According to KUOW’s Patricia Murphy, the Seattle Police Department is investigating the incident.

Japanese Farm Food
Nancy Singleton Hachisu moved from California to Japan intending to stay a year. Instead she fell in love with the culture, the food and a local farmer. Now — many years and three kids later — she lives on an organic farm in an 80-year-old traditional Japanese farmhouse. She writes about life, love and food in her cookbook "Japanese Farm Food."

Greendays Gardening Panel
Gardening is not just growing vegetables, pruning ornamentals or planting natives. Modern organic gardeners are trying to incorporate practices and aestheticism that works in any kind of garden. Our gardening panel is just the group to bring the ideas together this week and every week on KUOW. They answer your gardening questions live at 10:40 a.m. Call 206.543.5869 or email weekday@kuow.org.

International
9:00 am
Tue April 23, 2013

National Teacher Of The Year, Vali Nasr, And Being Bipolar

Vali Nasr speaking at World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, January 23, 2013.
Flickr Photo/World Economic Forum

2013 Teacher Of The Year
Jeff Charbonneau, a science teacher from Zillah, Washington, has been selected as 2013 National Teacher of the Year. He’ll share his wisdom and teaching style with us while en route to the White House for his award ceremony.

The Dispensable Nation
President Obama’s foreign policy emphasizes China and Asia instead of the Middle East and Europe. The administration is shifting military resources and diplomatic energy as China expands its global footprint. Former State Department Policy Advisor Vali Nasr says President Obama’s foreign policy is too cautious and a danger to the future peace and security of the planet.

What Is It Like To Be Bipolar? Part 2
What does it feel like to be bipolar? How does the mental illness affect family and relationships? What misunderstandings are held by the general public? Does a person who is bipolar consider themselves “crazy?” Author Janine Crowley Haynes considers these questions in her memoir "My Kind of Crazy: Living in a Bipolar World."

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

Politics and Government
10:00 am
Mon April 22, 2013

News From Olympia, David Stockman, Covering Breaking News

Washington state capitol.
Credit Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova

This Week In Olympia
The legislative session is almost over but lots of issues remain unresolved. Education funding is still up in the air, so is an agreement on a balanced budget.  Jerry Cornfield, reporter and political columnist for the Everett Herald is waiting for answers along with the rest of us.
 

David Stockman Takes The American Economy To The Woodshed
In 1985,  federal budget Director David Stockman was sharply rebuked by his boss, Ronald Reagan, for saying the president’s tax programs were trickle-down programs to help the rich. These days, author David Stockman is taking Ben Bernanke, Wall Street Banks and the Obama administration to the woodshed for printing money, running deficits and leaving the gold standard.
 

The Media’s Boston Bomber Frenzy
CNN went on the air with misinformation about the imminent arrest of suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings. The front page of the New York Post identified the wrong men as suspects. Should audiences have any expectations for factual reporting during these fast moving stories? 

History
9:00 am
Mon April 22, 2013

DC Update, Media & History, Interfaith Amigos

The Washington, DC: Week In Review
What was it like to work in Washington, DC, last week? Lawmakers rejected all the gun control proposals despite testimony from Newtown parents. President Obama expressed his disappointment, calling it a "shameful day" for the country. Add to that, the contaminated letters and awful bombing in Boston. CBS News producer Jill Jackson brings us a week in review.

How Media Shapes History
Thousands of years ago, the development of writing gave power to writers. Today, the computer gives power to coders. William Bernstein chronicles the impacts technology has on human communication from its origins in Mesopotamia to our 21st century global society in his book, “Masters of the Word: How Media Shaped History.”

Interfaith Amigos: Ancient Texts In A Modern World
The Bible, the Torah and the Quran are ancient religious texts written for an ancient audience.  How do we adapt ancient teachings to a modern world? The Interfaith Amigos share their views.

Mental Health
10:00 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Living With Bipolar Disorder

How does mental illness shape relationships with others?
Credit Flickr Photo/Majicdolphin

What does it feel like to be bipolar? How does mental illness affect family and relationships? What misunderstandings does the general public have about people who are bipolar? Katy Sewall speaks with Janine Crowley Haynes, author of the memoir “My Kind of Crazy: Living in a Bipolar World.”

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Public Safety
9:00 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Behind The Scenes With SPD's Bomb Unit

A bomb squad exercise.
Credit Flickr Photo/Settsu

Investigators are trying to piece together this week's bombings at the Boston Marathon. What clues are they looking for? How are bombs detected and disarmed? Seattle Police Department explosives experts Randy Curtis and Craig Williamson join us with an inside look. Call with your questions to 206.543.5869.


VIDEO: Watch Dennis the SPD Bomb Dog In Action

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