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World Cruiser Christening
7:04 am
Fri June 28, 2013

Dream About To Take Flight For Seattle Couple

Seattle pilots Bob and Diane Dempster with their Douglas World Cruiser replica, 2013.
Credit Courtesy of Bob and Diane Dempster

In 1924, Seattle’s Sand Point was the site of one of the greatest aviation milestones of all time. But the event was eclipsed by other aviators like Charles Lindbergh and the Wright Brothers. Now, a Seattle couple wants to breathe new life into that momentous time with their own pioneering project.

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Beloved Descendent Remembered
5:14 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Pacific Northwest Pioneer Descendant Brewster Denny Dead at 88

Brewster Denny, dean emeritus of the Evans School of Public Affairs, completes his plan of ringing the Denny Bell to announce Homecoming for a half century.
Mary Levin UW Photography

Seattle pioneer descendant Brewster Denny passed away this past Saturday from natural causes. He was 88 years old.  Denny spent much of his life as a champion of local history, and for many, he was a living embodiment of Seattle’s pioneer era.

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Bridge History
9:13 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Failed Bridges In Washington's History

Allen Street Bridge
WSDOT Photo

Last month's I-5 Skagit River bridge collapse is just one of a number of major bridge failures in Washington's history. Washington is home to four of the nation's 11 floating bridges, two of which have sunk. Here is a look at the state's highest-profile bridge failures.

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History
11:56 am
Wed June 19, 2013

Happy Juneteenth! The Importance And History Of “Emancipation Day”

Juneteenth is an official holiday in Texas, but it's celebrated more widely across the country. Here members of Buffalo Soldiers participate in a past Juneteenth parade in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/jseattle

 Juneteenth, sometimes called Emancipation Day or Freedom Day, commemorates a day in 1865 when Texas slaves learned that they had finally been granted their freedom. David Hyde talks to historian Kenneth Davis about the historical significance of the day. Plus, a guide to some local Juneteenth celebrations.

 

Local Music History
8:00 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Best Of The Conversation: Early Seattle Music, Hendrix, And Heart

How did Ann and Nancy Wilson go from middle-class Bellevue teenagers to international stars?

This hour on The Conversation we’re taking a long, strange trip through Seattle’s musical history. We’ll start before rock 'n roll was invented; when Seattle had a vibrant, professional music scene, thanks in part to powerful unions. We’ll learn about Jimi Hendrix’s early days when he got by as a backup guitarist for the likes of Little Richard. Also, author Charles R. Cross tells us how Ann and Nancy Wilson from the Seattle band, Heart, went from middle-class Bellevue teenagers to international stars.

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Social Issues
10:00 am
Mon May 20, 2013

Return Of The 787, The Ancient Maya And The End Of Life

Flickr Photo/Rob Shenk

Boeing 787 Back In The Air
Boeing’s 787 has returned to the sky after a four-month grounding by the FAA when an United Airlines Dreamliner took off this morning from Houston en route to Chicago’s O’Hare airport. Richard Aboulafia, aerospace analyst with Teal Group Corporation explains the impact of the 787 on Boeing and its flight future. 

In Search of the Ancient Maya
Archaeologist William Saturno has spent decades studying, excavating and documenting the ancient Mayan culture. He was the first person in 2,000 years to see the San Bartolo murals, and he recently discovered proof that the Maya did not believe the world would end in 2012 as commonly thought. What did that feel like? How did ancient Maya become the center of his work? What can we learn from the Mayans?  

Medical Interventions and the End of Life    
As science and technology improves, medicine changes. As Americans, we’ve come to expect that medical interventions can give us a new knee, help us survive cancer and help extend our lives far longer than in the past. But is intervention always a good idea? Retired doctor Jim deMain blogs about how to make decisions on when to end or extend life. 

History
1:29 pm
Wed May 15, 2013

Liberia: America's Original Self-Deportation Scheme

A man peers through a door in Liberia.
Credit Flickr photo/ kennethharper

In the decades leading up to the civil war, white Americans uncomfortable with the rising numbers of free blacks came up with a plan. Get rid of them. Specifically, convince them to resettle in Liberia. It was America's original "self-deportation" scheme. But things didn't go exactly according to plan.

List of stories from KUOW Presents,  May 15:

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Terrorism
10:16 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Fear Tactics: A History Of Domestic Terrorism

Coming up on Spotlight on Monday, April 29 at 8:00 p.m.

On September 16, 1920, a bomb exploded on Wall Street as workers took their lunch break. The explosion killed 38 people and injured hundreds. The targets? What today we’d call “the one percent” — powerful financiers who ran J.P. Morgan & Co. The Wall Street attack remained the deadliest terrorist bombing in the US until Oklahoma City in 1995. But at the time, people saw it as just one more bombing in a long string of anarchist attacks that historian Beverly Gage calls America's “First Age of Terror.”

Gage and the American History Guys explore the origins of domestic terrorism in the United States and the question of what kinds of people and movements have been identified as “terrorist.” The program traces the relationship between “terror” and the state; considers lynching as a tactic of terrorism; and takes a look at a little known and unfinished Jack London novel, in which the author grapples with the question: When, if ever, is terrorism justified?

History
9:00 am
Mon April 22, 2013

DC Update, Media & History, Interfaith Amigos

The Washington, DC: Week In Review
What was it like to work in Washington, DC, last week? Lawmakers rejected all the gun control proposals despite testimony from Newtown parents. President Obama expressed his disappointment, calling it a "shameful day" for the country. Add to that, the contaminated letters and awful bombing in Boston. CBS News producer Jill Jackson brings us a week in review.

How Media Shapes History
Thousands of years ago, the development of writing gave power to writers. Today, the computer gives power to coders. William Bernstein chronicles the impacts technology has on human communication from its origins in Mesopotamia to our 21st century global society in his book, “Masters of the Word: How Media Shaped History.”

Interfaith Amigos: Ancient Texts In A Modern World
The Bible, the Torah and the Quran are ancient religious texts written for an ancient audience.  How do we adapt ancient teachings to a modern world? The Interfaith Amigos share their views.

WWII Memorabilia
9:53 am
Wed April 10, 2013

Collector To Return Japanese War Flag Nearly 70 Years After Capture

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 4:14 pm


A collector of World War II memorabilia has succeeded in a daunting quest thanks to help from the Japanese government. The veteran from Clarkston, Washington has found the right person to receive a Japanese war flag taken in battle nearly 70 years ago.


Years ago, memorabilia collector George Koller bought an inscribed "good luck flag." It originally belonged to a Japanese fighter pilot killed in combat. Last year, Koller asked the Japanese consulate in Seattle for help to give the flag back.

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Religion
12:20 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

The Extraordinary History Of Scientology

Cover of 'Going Clear' by Lawrence Wright.

In 1950 L. Ron Hubbard published "Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health" and 3 years later he founded the first church of Scientology. Ross Reynolds talks with Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Lawrence Wright about his detailed history of Scientology, "Going Clear."

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Sports History
3:54 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

Bill Mullins On The Seattle Pilots And Stadium Politics

In 1969, Major League Baseball arrived in the Pacific Northwest, when the Seattle Pilots played one ill-fated season before taking off to become the Milwaukee Brewers. Seattle wouldn’t get another professional team until 1977, when the Mariners were born. What happened? The answer has a lot to do with money and politics. Bill Mullins tells the story in “Becoming Big League: Seattle, the Pilots and Stadium Politics." Plus, the Mariners beat Oakland 2-0 last night to win their seventh straight opening day game. Sportspress Northwest's Art Thiel joins us with an outlook on their chances this season.

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Cultural History
2:00 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Ray Suarez On "Latino Americans"

Ray Suarez
Credit PBS

Journalist Ray Suarez just finished writing a new book called "Latino Americans." The way he sees it, American history as it's currently taught tends to ignore Latinos. He hopes to change that. His book starts in the 17th century and goes up until yesterday, when he sent the book off to his publisher. Suarez gives Ross Reynolds the long view of "Latino America." Below are highlights from the interview, along with excerpts from his 2010 speech, "The Browning of America."

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Cultural Heritage
10:00 am
Thu March 28, 2013

A "Yokohama Yankee" Journeys Into His Family's Past

Leslie Helm's 'Yokohama Yankee.'

Leslie Helm was born and raised in Yokohama, Japan. Most of his family members are of European descent, and you would be hard pressed to look into his face and see his half-Japanese grandparents reflected back. When he adopted Japanese children, he started exploring his own roots. Leslie Helm takes us along on his journey as a "Yokohama Yankee" — a story that outlines the racial and economic tensions that defined US and Japanese relations for much of the 19th and 20th centuries.

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Chief Seattle Treaty
5:39 pm
Tue March 26, 2013

Duwamish Tribe Renews Hopes For Federal Recognition

Cecile Hansen, chairwoman of the Duwamish Tribe.
Courtesy Photo

At the Duwamish Longhouse in West Seattle, Cecile Hansen traces her finger down a plaque of names. “Look at all our leaders, starting with the chief here,” Hansen says.

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