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9:49 am
Thu October 30, 2014

New Crash Test Dummy To Gain Pounds To Reflect Fatalities Among Obese

The new crash test dummy — not this one — will weigh 271 lbs and have a body mass index of 35. Automakers use the dummies to prove their vehicles are roadworthy.
Patrick Krost iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 12:07 pm

More than one-third of Americans are obese, and one recent study showed that obese drivers are more likely to die in a car crash. So the world's largest maker of dummies is making one that is obese.

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Shots - Health News
12:42 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Scientists Implicate More Than 100 Genes In Causing Autism

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 3:51 pm

The hunt to find genes that cause autism has been a long slog, one hampered by a lack of technology and families willing to be tested.

But the effort is starting to pay off. On Tuesday, researchers at more than 50 laboratories said they had identified more than 100 genes that are mutated in children with autism, dozens more than were known before.

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Goats and Soda
9:42 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Why The Ebola Evacuees Survived And What We Learned From Them

NBC cameraman Ashoka Mukpo, 33, contracted Ebola in Liberia, arrived in Nebraska for care on Oct. 6 and was released from the hospital Oct. 22.
Taylor Wilson Courtesy of Nebraska Medicine

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 12:03 pm

This is a week for reflecting on lessons learned from those who've survived Ebola.

Morning Edition aired a report on the experience of medical personnel at Emory Hospital, which has cared for four Ebola patients: three evacuees from West Africa (including Dr. Kent Brantly) and one of the Texas nurses.

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Legal Battle
8:19 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Maine To Enforce Quarantine For Nurse Who Worked In West Africa

A photo taken Sunday of Kaci Hickox in an isolation tent at University Hospital in Newark, N.J. Hickox, who was later discharged and allowed to return to her home in Maine, says she has no intention of abiding by a "voluntary" quarantine there.
Steven Hyman AP

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 10:08 am

Maine's Gov. Paul LePage says he will seek to legally force a nurse to undergo a 21-day quarantine after her return from West Africa, where she volunteered to treat Ebola patients.

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Health News
6:28 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Ebola Calls Northwest Volunteers To Action, Medical Centers To Prepare

Marc Bouma, an E.R. nurse at Swedish Hospital in Seattle, is taking a leave of absence to fight Ebola in Liberia. In this photo he was volunteering in Haiti after the earthquake of 2010.

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 7:18 pm

Across the Northwest medical professionals are getting ready for Ebola.

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The Record
2:47 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Dr. Atul Gawande On What Matters In End-Of-Life Care

Credit Flickr Photo/hapal (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds has a wide-ranging discussion of end-of-life issues with Atul Gawande, author of “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End."  

Gawande discusses  several issues such as how medical science views death as a failure, and does not always examine how medical treatments affect people at the end; innovations in assisted living and hospice to not only improve the quality of life, but also allow people to live longer; and how health care professionals are trying to become better at end of life care.

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Ebola Prevention
2:23 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

No Hand-Washing, Spotty Temperature-Taking At Liberia's Airport

NPR producer Rolando Arrieta approaches the Ebola screening station at the airport in Monrovia, Liberia.
Michaeleen Doucleff NPR

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 8:28 am

Ebola screening for passengers flying out of Monrovia's airport on Monday night wasn't functioning like a well-oiled machine. Parts of it were chaotic and slightly concerning.

After 10 days of reporting in Liberia, we arrived at the airport to take two of the same flights that Thomas Eric Duncan took last month: Monrovia to Brussels and then on to Dulles in Virginia. There were three of us: me, another reporter and a producer.

Before we went inside the terminal, a woman from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention greeted us outside.

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Shots - Health News
1:36 am
Mon October 27, 2014

Corneal Implants Might Make Reading Glasses Obsolete

A corneal inlay next to a contact lens.
Courtesy of John Vukich

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 6:03 am

For Lori Bandt, who works as a medical technician and an EMT in a suburb of Madison, Wis., the print on vials of medication has become so difficult to read that if she forgets her reading glasses she has to resort to having a younger EMT worker read the directions. The 45-year-old says: "I'm just stuck."

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Shots - Health News
1:36 am
Mon October 27, 2014

In The Hospital, A Bad Translation Can Destroy A Life

Dr. Angela Alday talks with Isidro Hernandes, via a Spanish-speaking interpreter, Armando Jimenez. Both patient and doctor say they much prefer an in-person interpreter to one on the phone.
Jeff Schilling Courtesy of Tuality Healthcare

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 5:58 am

Translating from one language to another is a tricky business, and when it comes to interpreting between a doctor and patient, the stakes are even higher.

Consider the story of 18-year-old baseball player Willie Ramirez.

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Health And Healing
2:28 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

Fighting The Stigma Of Ebola With Hugs

Patient Nina Pham is hugged by Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, outside of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., on Friday. Pham was discharged after testing free of Ebola.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

When Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, hugged Dallas nurse Nina Pham on Friday it was as much to combat the stigma surrounding the deadly virus as to celebrate her being free of Ebola.

Fauci said it was an honor to treat Pham and get to know "such an extraordinary individual." Pham said she felt "fortunate and blessed" and put her trust "in God and my medical team."

Pham later met with President Obama in the Oval Office. The president and the nurse also hugged as news photographers captured the moment.

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End Of Life
2:07 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Seattle Is Blazing The Trail On Cremation

Kenya Carver holds ashes of her friend Richard Haney. She is scattering them around the world on her travels.
KUOW Photo/Matthew Streib

Ross Reynolds talks with Jeff Jorgenson, owner of Elemental Cremation and Burial, about why 90 percent of people in Seattle are cremated, compared with only 47 percent nationally.

Science
2:00 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

When Can You Say Something Causes Cancer?

Artificial turf has been in the news lately for suspicions that it could contribute to certain types of cancer.
Credit Flickr Photo/Lisa Parker (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Dr. Parveen Bhatti, environmental epidemiologist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, about how researchers determine causality.

Health
1:57 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

What's My Risk Of Catching Ebola?

Data sources: David Ropeik/Harvard University, National Weather Service, World Health Organization, Northeastern University Laboratory for the Modeling of Biological and Socio-Technical Systems, National Geographic, United States Census
Adam Cole and Ryan Kellman NPR

Originally published on Sat October 25, 2014 7:57 pm

Health officials are saying it. Scientists are saying it. Heck, even many journalists are saying it: "The risk of Ebola infection remains vanishingly small in this country," The New York Times wrote Wednesday.

But what does that mean? Are you more likely to be struck by lightning or catch Ebola?

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Doctor Shortages
8:47 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Struggling To Bring Health Care To Rural Washington

Carmin Russell, who brought her 2-year-old into the Yelm Sea Mar clinic said getting care used to be an all-day event.
Credit KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Community health centers have been busier than usual. They’re seeing more patients, many of them newly insured.

The centers, which provide care for mostly low income families, are meeting the demand by branching out to remote, underserved communities. But the challenge now is finding enough providers to staff these clinics.

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