Government

There are organizations pushing for more religious speech – and some demanding less. That’s a product of the country’s ongoing culture wars, but these cases aren’t changing the law – because the role of religious speech in public schools is already clear.
Flickr Photo/Challenge Convention (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Michael Leal, a student at Everett’s Cascade High School, had been suspended three times for passing out Christian literature and preaching on campus. The school worried his activities would offend other students.

New York Police Department officer Joshua Jones wears a VieVu body camera on his chest during a news conference, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014 in New York.
AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

Marcie Sillman talks with Vievu CEO Steve Ward, who is also a former SWAT officer with the Seattle police, about his company's body cameras that have been implemented by 4,000 police agencies nationwide. This week, President Barack Obama set aside $75 million for police agencies to purchase body cameras.

File photo.
Flickr Photo/Wendy (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Ivan Moreno, reporter for the Associated Press in Colorado, about the how their universal background check law went into effect last year. Washington state's passed a similar law in November.

A federal audit of a 24-hour national hotline for homeless veterans found that callers didn’t always receive assistance or access to needed services.

The Office of the Inspector General said lapses in management and oversight at the call center led to more than 40,000 missed opportunities to help.

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Congress has added lots of land deals – including some in the Northwest – to a must-pass defense spending package.

But a bill that would boost logging on Oregon's O&C forestland didn't make the cut. These are public lands in Western Oregon, named for the Oregon & California Railroad -- O&C for short -- that once owned them.

New data from the FAA shows the frequency of close calls between manned aircraft and small drones is soaring.

Washington’s new background check law for person-to-person gun sales and transfers takes effect Thursday.

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle-King County NAACP President Gerald Hankerson about police reform in Seattle in the wake recent events in Ferguson, Missouri. 

Two Washington prison inmates have committed suicide in recent weeks at the state’s main intake facility in Shelton.

Women's reproductive rights are once again before the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday. Only this time, pregnancy discrimination is the issue and pro-life and pro-choice groups are on the same side, opposed by business groups.

Don Benfield of Taylorsville, N.C., makes $11 an hour working for a mobile-home parts business, selling things like replacement doors and windows.

Benfield, 51, doesn't have health insurance.

"I haven't had health care insurance in years, simply because I haven't been able to afford it, especially with food prices, how they went up," he explains.

Benfield's employer does offer health insurance coverage, even though, with fewer than 50 employees, the business is not required to.

Washington’s Legislative Ethics Board has capped the number of free meals lawmakers can accept from lobbyists.

A study says that iPhone's Siri program -- which can be used without hands or eyes -- is a huge distraction for drivers.
Flickr Photo/Elizabeth Press (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The Washington Traffic Safety Commission is taking another run at an expanded distracted driving law. A proposed bill is sitting at the governor’s office now. The legislation would expand the current ban on texting or holding a handset to the ear to include touching a mobile device while driving.

Though the proposal addresses more of the ways people are interacting with their devices, it leaves out one major distraction:  Siri.

On Monday night, St. Louis County prosecutor Robert McCulloch delivered the news that police officer Darren Wilson would not be indicted in the shooting death of Michael Brown. And in an unusual move, the announcement was accompanied by the release of an enormous batch of evidence presented to the grand jury — including much-talked-about photos of Wilson, taken after he shot and killed Brown.

Is Seattle Any Different Than Ferguson?

Nov 25, 2014
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones
Liz Jones / KUOW

“Hands up, don’t shoot,” protesters chanted, their hands up as they streamed down Seattle streets on Monday night and Tuesday. “Black lives matter.”

They were protesting a Missouri grand jury’s decision to not indict a police officer in the fatal shooting of black teenager Michael Brown. As they protested, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray held a news conference, saying the city is committed to the goals of racial and social justice.

"We are failing our young African-American men," he said.

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