Government

Amin Shifow, general manager of Puget Sound Yellow Cab, said he wants to start a hotline for drivers to report harassment and other potential crimes against them.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

A Muslim advocacy group in Seattle is calling on the FBI to look into a possible hate crime against a Somali taxi driver. According to Seattle Police, the attacker reportedly told the driver “you are a terrorist” and “I will shoot you,” then repeatedly punched him in the face.

“The severity of the incident makes this a more serious matter,” said Arsalan Bukhari, executive director of the Council on Islamic-American Relations (CAIR) in Washington state, which is part of a national organization. “The person was attacked by three people who left him bloodied and unconscious.”

In this file photo, King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg talks to reporters at a press conference in 2009.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Ross Reynolds speaks with King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg about why he decided not to bring felony charges against Seattle Police Officer Adley Shepherd.

Shepherd punched Miyekko Durden-Bosley, 23, in the face after she resisted arrest during a domestic violence call. Durden-Bosely sustained multiple fractures to her orbital socket.

The Yakama Nation and neighboring tribes are strongly objecting to a Congressional move to offer public access to the summit of Rattlesnake Mountain, a place tribal members consider sacred.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee is likely to propose a more than $1 billion revenue package when he unveils his proposed two-year budget next week.

Marcie Sillman talks with registered nurse Heather Barr about a King County initiative to provide flu shots to homeless people.  Barr is a nurse with King County's Healthcare for the Homeless Network.

Two workers walk through the first rings of the tunnel toward Bertha, the SR 99 tunneling machine.
Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Lynn Peterson, secretary of the Washington State Department of Transportation, about delays to the Seattle tunnel project to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct.

In June, KUOW Speakers Forum featured an event titled, “Exposing the Truth of U.S. Torture,” during which Brigadier General David R. Irvine lambasted U.S. torture practices abroad.

“If these kinds of practices were used by another nation on American serviceman, who were captives, who were prisoners of war, we as a nation would not tolerate it,” he said.

The search is widening for tenants to fill Washington’s overbuilt data center. Efforts to lease the 26,000 square feet of highly-secure warehouse space to the private sector have so far been unsuccessful.

The State Department launched a program this month that creates a safe passage to the United States from Central America. It would give some U.S.-based Latino parents the chance to bring over children they left in their home countries.

More than 57,000 child migrants made the trip across the U.S.-Mexican border this year. Many report being physically and sexually abused along the harrowing journey.

The agency that oversees child welfare in Washington wants to hire nearly 100 more child protection workers.

A bill that passed Thursday in the U.S. House includes big changes for the Tri-Cities. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 would create a new set of national parks in honor of the top-secret Manhattan Project.

Protesters in response to the Ferguson and Eric Garner grand jury decisions converge on downtown Seattle on Dec. 4, 2014.
Flickr Photo/Scott Lum (CC-BY-NC-ND)

  What did the Seattle protests accomplish? There were plenty to look at. We’ll separate Westlake Christmas tree chants from anarchist rocks. Also, with the Harvard Exit movie theater closing and the Stowell/Sendak Nutcracker ending, is Seattle losing its soul? And just how clean will the Duwamish River get (and how gentrified will its riverbanks become)?

Bill Radke reviews the news with Eli Sanders, Knute Berger and Joni Balter. Plus, KUOW EarthFix reporter Ashley Ahearn.

Amy Radil

Initiative 594 took effect Thursday, and Washington joined six other states with the broadest background checks for gun sales. Cheryl Stumbo and other members of the Washington Alliance for Gun Responsibility marked the date with a press conference at Plymouth Church in downtown Seattle.

“Initiative 594 is in effect, and today Washington has closed the background check loophole,” Stumbo said as members applauded.

Low-wage workers picketed and rallied across the country Thursday in support of a $15 per hour minimum wage.

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