Education

Courtesy of Ayan Jama

The sun was peeking through the clouds on Saturday, April 25  at Victor Steinbreuck Park in downtown Seattle, where a crowd gathered to celebrate the first ever Islamophobia Awareness Day.

The event was created by a group of Muslim girls from Rainier Beach High School. 

File photo of students playing basketball.
Flickr Photo/Nick Hubbard (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Dr. Jonathan Drezner, director of the University of Washington Medicine Center for Sports Cardiology, about sudden cardiac arrest and a new law to help protect Washington's student athletes.

Garfield High School
Flickr Photo/Don Brubeck (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Eleventh graders in Washington state are saying heck no to the Smarter Balanced Assessment. At Garfield High School in Seattle’s Central Area, 95 percent of kids didn’t show up to the test this week.

At Richland High School in Eastern Washington, 83 percent of juniors didn’t show up on the first day of testing. (Some may have shown up later, but a compliance officer at the school said that was highly unlikely.)

The test is not required to graduate, which is why they’re not showing up.

On the first day of school, perhaps the only person more discussed than the "new kid" is the "new kid who skipped a grade."

Words like "gifted," "brilliant" and "genius" get thrown around to describe these students. Education researchers generally refer to them as "accelerated." It's a catch-all term to describe students who have either entered kindergarten early, grade-skipped or taken single subjects above grade level.

Part of the hype comes from how uncommon it is.

Researchers estimate no more than 2 percent of students fall into these categories.

While many kids are lucky if their parents send them off to school with a ham and cheese sandwich and an apple in their packed lunches, for some, the midday meal is a work of art.

Some parents include paper napkins with hand-drawn illustrations so elaborate that children have preferred to use their own clothing to wipe up spills. Others decorate the once-boring brown paper bag with fanciful dragons and scenes from Star Wars or re-create great works of art in food. (Think Vermeer's Girl With A Pearl Earring rendered in sushi.)

The teacher who tackled an armed student at North Thurston High School in Lacey, Washington said his protective instinct just kicked in.

The Tukwila School District boasts one of the most diverse student bodies in the state. But the NAACP of Seattle-King County says the district isn't doing enough to hire teachers of color.

The civil rights organization said it planned to confront the district’s board members Tuesday night about what it called “racist hiring practices.”

District Superintendent Nancy Coogan said the NAACP’s accusations are unfair.

A juvenile court commissioner found probable cause Tuesday to hold the 16-year-old accused of a shooting at North Thurston High School in Lacey, Washington.

Executive Constantine and a Seattle delegation visited Boston and New Jersey to learn about their universal preschool models in 2014.
Flickr Photo/Dow Constantine (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to King County Executive Dow Constantine about his proposed levy to fund an early development program for kids in King County. 

The University of Washington's Intellectual House.
Screenshot from YouTube

Jeannie Yandel talks with Ross Braine, the University of Washington's tribal liaison, about his big dreams for the University's brand new Intellectual House, a space for Native Americans on campus.

Much of our recent reporting, especially from New Orleans, has focused on young people who are neither in school nor working. There are an estimated 5 1/2 million of them, ages 16 to 24, in the United States.

Witnesses on the scene at North Thurston High School in Lacey, Washington said shots were fired on campus Monday morning by a student.

The doors to the cafeteria at Marysville-Pilchuck High School, where a freshman killed four of his friends and wounded a fifth. He then killed himself. The school has grappled with many questions since the shooting, including where to eat.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Few enter the cafeteria at Marysville-Pilchuck High School, where five freshmen were fatally shot six months ago, including the shooter, and one was wounded. The building stands off from the rest of campus, its gray doors locked.

How many different flavors of jam do you need to be happy?

In 2000, a famous experiment showed that when people were presented with a supermarket sampler of 24 exotic fruit flavors, they were more attracted to the display. But, when the sample included only six flavors, they were 10 times more likely to actually buy.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee said he doesn’t approve of one-day walkouts by teachers, but the Democrat also said he understands their frustration over pay raises and class size.

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