More and more schools are trying to serve meals with food that was grown nearby. The U.S. Department of Agriculture just released some statistics documenting the trend.

Matt Remle drafted the resolution adopted by the Seattle City Council recognizing the ongoing negative consequences of the American Indian boarding schools
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Matt Remle about the continued impact of American Indian boarding schools on Native American communities. Remle, a member of the Lakota tribe, drafted the resolution adopted by Seattle City Council recognizing the ongoing trauma these boarding schools caused in Washington and across the U.S. 

Recently a neighborhood in Brooklyn made national headlines for a fight over public schools. Lots of affluent, mainly white families have been moving into new condos in the waterfront area called DUMBO, and the local elementary school is getting overcrowded.

The city wants to redraw the zones in a way that would send kids from this predominantly white school to a nearby school where enrollment is over 90 percent black and Hispanic and which draws many of its students from a public housing project. Some parents on both sides of the line balked.

Juanita High School football field in Kirkland, Washington.
Flickr Photo/Henry Alva (CC BY NC ND)/

David Hyde talks to Geoff Baker, investigative reporter at the Seattle Times about the accusations of a culture of hazing at Juanita High School in Kirkland. 

Jonathan Grant, Jon Grant
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Did a local developer ask a Seattle City Council candidate for a quid pro quo? (And how often does that happen around here?) Will the University of Washington's new top Dawg be more loyal than the last few? And why are Seattle Schools moving teachers around this far into the school year?

Bill Radke discusses the week’s top stories with Q13’s C.R. Douglas, Washington Policy Center’s Paul Guppy and Seattle Channel’s Joni Balter.

A sexual harassment case is sending shock waves through the scientific community this week, and raising questions nationwide about how common sexual harassment is in science and why so little is typically done to stop it.

A six-month investigation by the University of California, Berkeley concluded in June that a faculty member, renowned astronomer Geoffrey Marcy, violated multiple sexual harassment policies over the course of a decade.

College students can't miss the warnings these days about the risk of campus sexual assault, but increasingly, some students are also taking note of what they perceive as a different danger.

"Once you are accused, you're guilty," says Parker Oaks, one of several Boston University students stopped by NPR between classes. "We're living in a society where you're guilty before innocent now."

Xavier Adsera, another BU student, sounds a similar theme. "We used to not be fair to women on this issue," he says. "Now we're on the other extreme, not being fair to guys."

University of Washington's Suzzallo Library.
Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC-BY-NC-ND)/

David Hyde talks to Jack Stripling, a reporter for The Chronicle of Higher Education, about the University of Washington's new president Ana Mari Cauce. 

New University of Washington president Ana Marie Cauce in the KUOW greenroom.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Ana Marie Cauce, newly selected president of the University of Washington, about her commitment to the school and her plans as its new leader.

Ann Dornfeld / KUOW

This was not your usual bake sale.

"We’ve got some Bum Deal Brownies, Overcrowding Oreos, B.S. Banana Bread, Forget the Kids Fig Bars," laughed Darcey Pickard as she showed off the pastries parents had donated for Tuesday's “Half-Baked Sale” on the sidewalk outside the Seattle Public Schools district headquarters.

Ana Mari Cauce
Courtesy of University of Washington

Ana Mari Cauce is the new president of the University of Washington. The university's board of regents made the announcement after a brief meeting Tuesday afternoon.

Alki Elementary School in West Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Joe Wolf (CC BY ND 2.0)/

Jeannie Yandel talks to Brian Jones, a North Seattle dad who donated $70,000 to Alki Elementary School to help them keep a teacher and to make a statement on Washington state's education funding.  

Poor and minority students in Washington state are more likely to be labeled truants. That’s a according to the state’s 2015 Truancy Report out Wednesday.

Kim Malcom sits down with Angelina Godoy, director of the University of Washington's Center for Human Rights, and UW law student Mina Manuchehri, a lead researcher at the Center. They discuss why the UW is suing the CIA over documents Manuchehri requested under the Freedom of Information Act about an alleged massacre in El Salvador. 

Waking up early on a Saturday. Sharpened No. 2 pencils and a calculator. For teenagers headed to a four-year college, taking a standardized entrance exam such as the ACT and SAT is typically a requirement. But it's far from a universal experience.

In 50 of the largest U.S. cities, examined in a new report from the University of Washington, Bothell's nonpartisan Center on Reinventing Public Education, fewer than 1 in 3 students takes either of those tests in a given year.