Education

RadioActive producer Jaylen Wheeler at a RadioActive listening party.
KUOW Photo / Jason Pagano

I’ve done this a million times: Wake up, get ready, drive to school.

At first, I hated getting up so early for school every day. It only made it worse that it took me an hour to get there. It would have been easier if it was five minutes away.

Executive Constantine and a Seattle delegation visited Boston and New Jersey to learn about their universal preschool models in 2014.
Flickr Photo/Dow Constantine (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to King County Executive Dow Constantine about his proposed program, "Best Starts For Kids," which would help build early education programs in King County.

From Foster Care To Freshman Year

Jan 6, 2015

By the time she aged out of foster care, Jasmine Uqdah had spent nearly half her life in the system. On a summer day in 2008, Uqdah grabbed her duffel bag and two small garbage bags, and she stuffed everything she owned inside.

It wasn't much — just some clothes and a few stuffed animals. She said her goodbyes to her foster family in Detroit and moved out. She was 18 years old.

Driven by higher tuition fees and tighter state funds, America's public colleges now get more money from their students than from all state sources. That's according to a report by the Government Accountability Office, which says tuition revenue reached 25 percent of the colleges' total in 2012.

The numbers are stark, with the GAO saying that from fiscal years 2003-2012, "state funding decreased by 12 percent overall while median tuition rose 55 percent across all public colleges."

Flickr Photo/Nick Amoscato (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Don Nielsen, former member of the Seattle School Board and author of the new book, "Every School: One Citizens' Guide To Transforming Education," about his thoughts on the school system. 

We asked for nominations for "most misused word or phrase," and they came pouring in. Weekend Edition listeners and NPR.org readers have many gripes about the grammar gaffes they see and hear every day.

From nearly 450 story comments, 500 emails and more than 900 Facebook posts we received in December, we identified 275 separate nominees. Here's a top 10 countdown of the most frequently mentioned:

When the children's television show Sesame Street first hit the air in 1969, many were deeply skeptical that you could use TV to introduce very young children to the basics of reading and math. But the experiment proved to be a remarkable success; Sesame Street has reached several generations of toddlers with its combination of educational content and pure entertainment. And now, Sesame Workshop is using new technology to reach the next generation.

Thomas O'Donnell's kindergarten kids are all hopped up to read about Twiggle the anthropomorphic Turtle.

"Who can tell me why Twiggle here is sad," O'Donnell asks his class at Matthew Henson Elementary School in Baltimore.

"Because he doesn't have no friends," a student pipes up.

And how do people look when they're sad?

"They look down!" the whole class screams out.

Yeah, Twiggle is lonely. But, eventually, he befriends a hedgehog, a duck and a dog. And along the way, he learns how to play, help and share.

Laurie Fendrich took a buyout from Hofstra University to retire when she was 66-years-old. In an article in The Chronicle of Higher Education, Fendrich argues that other college professors should follow her example because remaining on faculty indefinitely is bad for students and universities.

Washington State Legislature in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with KUOW's Olympia corespondent, Austin Jenkins, about a few of the biggest stories of the year from the Washington State Legislature

Foster High School senior Nandina Cengic is a feminist, filmmaker and activist.
Courtesy of Jesenko Spahic

Do you hate men?

Nandina Cengic said she hears that question all the time. That's because the Foster High School senior tells people she is a feminist. As she puts it, people assume she's a "man hater," who's "trying to squander men."

"Which isn't true at all!" she said. 

Last week, the Taliban attacked the Army Public School in Peshawar, Pakistan, killing more than 140 people, most of them schoolchildren.

Professor Ralina Joseph at the University of Washington says to just start talking about race.
University of Washington

Protests over high profile police shootings have renewed calls to discuss police treatment of African-Americans – and talk about race relations in general. But how do we have those difficult and often awkward conversations? KUOW’s Jamala Henderson put that question to University of Washington Professor Ralina Joseph. Highlights from the interview:

How do I talk about race with family and friends?

Olympia Washington State Legislature
Flickr Photo/Harvey Barrison (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW's Olympia correspondent, Austin Jenkins, about the upcoming session and what that could mean for education funding in Washington state.

School desk
Flickr Photo/ccarlstead (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Steve Sundquist, chair of the Washington State Charter School Commission, about the probation of Washington's first charter school and what it means for the many schools set to open next year.

Pages