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Foodies
2:19 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Blogger Orangette On Business, Marriage And Pizza

Delancey, a pizza restaurant in Ballard, was started five years ago by wife and husband team Molly Wizenberg and Brandon Pettit.
Flickr Photo/Lee Davenport (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Molly Wizenberg, author of the popular food blog Orangette, has a new book out this week detailing the far-fetched beginnings of Delancey, the restaurant she shares with husband Brandon Pettit.

On Orangette, Wizenberg said she met her husband through her blog. Early in their relationship, she told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds, Pettit was a trained musician in a Ph.D. program for musical composition.

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Fireproofing Homes
8:11 am
Mon May 5, 2014

Study Finds 'Firewise' Homes Don't Reduce Wildfire Costs

File photo. A helicopter drops water on the Waldo Canyon fire on June 27, 2012.

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 4:32 pm

The federal government is already predicting this fire season will push firefighting resources almost $500 million over budget.

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Good Reads
2:40 pm
Fri May 2, 2014

Book Hugger Nancy Pearl Revists Old Favorites

Flickr Photo/Quinn Dombrowski (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Nancy Pearl about the books she has been re-reading lately, including Reif Larsen's "The Selected Works of T.S. Spivett," and David Lodge's "The Campus Trilogy."

Earthquake Safety Measures
12:50 pm
Fri May 2, 2014

Life In The Cascadia Subduction Zone

Credit Oregon State University (OSU) Press

Ross Reynolds speaks with Bonnie Henderson about her new book "The Next Tsunami: Living on a Restless Coast."

Just off the coast of Washington and Oregon is a fault line with potential to unleash an earthquake larger than the deadly magnitude 9 Japan quake in 2011 that triggered a tsunami.

Henderson tells the story about how geologists learned of the Cascadia Subduction Zone and how public officials have tried to adopt safety measures.

Spoiler alert: when you hear a siren, walk and keep walking.

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Obituary
3:37 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Jerry Manning, Seattle Rep Artistic Director, Dies Suddenly

Jerry Manning
Credit Credit Seattle Rep Theatre

Jerry Manning, the artistic leader of Seattle Repertory Theatre, died suddenly on Wednesday following complications from a routine surgery in March, according to a news release from the theater. He was 58.

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Shifting Sands
3:07 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

A Look At America's Middle East Foreign Policy Over The Last 70 Years

Credit Joel Migdal's book "Shifting Sands."

Steve Scher talks to University of Washington professor Joel Migdal about his new book "Shifting Sands: The United States and The Middle East."

Arts
3:02 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

'It’s Like Pornography': Searching For Cultural Space In Seattle

Alexander Calder's "Eagle" at Seattle's Olympic Sculpture Park.
Credit Flickr Photo/~C4Chaos

Matthew Richter has his dream job. For the past eight months, he has served as Seattle's Cultural Spaces Liaison. But when you ask him to tell you what a cultural space is, he laughs.

"That's the million dollar question,” Richter said. “It's like pornography (you know it when you see it)."

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Xbox One
1:30 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Microsoft Takes Advantage Of Relaxed Game Console Ban In China

Flickr Photo/Marco Verch (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Microsoft may have found a way to pull ahead of the Sony Playstation — in China.

The company partnered this week with a Chinese company to bring its Xbox One gaming console out of the black market and into Chinese stores.

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Helping China's Orphans
10:30 am
Thu May 1, 2014

'Wish You Happy Forever' With Jenny Bowen

Credit Jenny Bowen's book "Wish You Happy Forever."

In 1996 Jenny Bowen was in Los Angeles living a comfortable and, she said, not very meaningful existence.

Reading the New York Times one Saturday morning, she and her husband were disturbed by a photo of a little girl in a Chinese orphanage. Bowen’s determination to do something about what she’d seen would change her life, and ultimately the lives of orphans across China.

Bowen founded the organization Half the Sky to better the lives of orphan children living in China’s welfare institutions. Half the Sky operates programs for orphans from birth to adulthood.

All offer loving care, stimulation, education, all the kinds of things a child who lives in a family may have. The Chinese government has invited Half the Sky to train every child welfare worker in the country.

Jenny Bowen spoke at Town Hall Seattle on April 1. She is also the author of a book, "Wish You Happy Forever."

Player: Racism 'Lost Cause'
10:24 am
Thu May 1, 2014

European Soccer Tackles Racism But Slips On A Banana Peel

A banana thrown earlier this season by supporters of RCD Espanyol during the La Liga match between RCD Espanyol and FC Barcelona at Cornella-El Prat Stadium.
Alex Caparros Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 8:49 am

While sports fan in the U.S. have been focused this week on the Donald Sterling scandal, European soccer fans have been talking about another racial incident. At a match between FC Barcelona (popularly known as Barça) and Villareal CF in Spain this past weekend, Brazilian player Dani Alves was setting up to take a corner kick when a banana, thrown by a fan, landed in front of him on the pitch. (You know, because racist taunts are never subtle.)

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Classics in Concert
10:19 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Seattle Symphony, New Pulitzer Winner At Carnegie Hall

Composer John Luther Adams accepts enthusiastic applause from the Carnegie Hall audience after the New York premiere of his 2014 Pulitzer Prize-winning piece, Become Ocean, performed by the Seattle Symphony Orchestra.
Melanie Burford for NPR Music

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 1:19 pm

The great outdoors is a perennial theme in classical music, usually expressed through bucolic or picturesque works. But the Seattle Symphony knew that to appear on Spring for Music — an annual festival of adventurous programming by North American orchestras — it required a more unusual, daring take on this theme.

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Tradition Vs. Innovation
8:18 am
Thu May 1, 2014

'Axe Bat' Wins Converts, But Has To Overcome Baseball Traditionalists

An Axe Bat (top) vs. a traditional baseball bat

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 9:36 pm

A family-owned sporting goods company in suburban Seattle is confronting the tension between honoring tradition and embracing innovation in the sport of baseball.

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Author Interview
4:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Regulating Caffeine: How Much Is Too Much?

Credit Murray Carpenter's book, "Caffeinated."

Ross Reynolds speaks with journalist Murray Carpenter about his book, “Caffeinated: How Our Daily Habit Helps, Hurts, and Hooks Us."

The book takes a closer look at the common drug we take for granted on a daily basis.

Community Activists
2:45 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Marching For Immigration Reform On May Day

May Day march in Seattle.
Credit Flickr Photo/One America (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Juan Jose Bocanegra, chairman of the May First Action Coalition, about the annual May Day march for immigration reform.

Off-Beat Booze
2:08 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Renegade Cider Makers Get Funky To Cope With Apple Shortage

Nat West, owner of Reverend Nat's Hard Cider in Portland, Ore., uses sweet apples to make cider, and gives it an extra kick with ginger juice, herbal tonics, coffee and hops.
Courtesy of Reverend Nat's Hard Cider

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 7:31 am

For centuries, hard apple cider has been made with the fermented juice of apples — nothing more, nothing less. And a lot of cider drinkers and makers — let's call them purists — like it that way.

But a new wave of renegade cider makers in America is shirking tradition and adding unusual ingredients to the fermentation tank — from chocolate and tropical fruit juices to herbs, chili peppers and unusual yeasts. Their aim — which is controversial among the purists — is to bring out the best, or just the weirdest, flavors in the ciders.

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