sports

Flickr Photo/Nathan Forget (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Clint Dempsey and the U.S. Men's National Soccer Team need only a tie against Germany to advance to the second round of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Bill Radke asks BBC soccer analyst Steve Crossman what we need to know to enjoy the match.

Amateurism is dead, revealed so in the trial against the NCAA now in progress in Oakland, Calif., U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken presiding. Before her skeptical eyes, amateurism has been laid out naked on a courtroom slab for a jury of all fans to see that it has no beating heart.

Amateurism, Judge Wilken has been told in the case, commonly known as the O'Bannon trial, nobly protects college athletes from being exploited by evil outsiders — so the NCAA knighthood was created in order that colleges could tie up athletes all by themselves.

FIFA, the governing body of the World Cup, says it has zero tolerance for racist and homophobic conduct by players and fans at this year's international soccer event.

Late last week, FIFA opened an investigation into the display of neo-Nazi banners by both Russian and Croat fans at the World Cup. And Brazil and Mexico face possible sanctions for chanting a homophobic slur during their match last week. But soccer fans say the world is misinterpreting the use of the word and their team spirit.

Flickr Photo/Keith Allison (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Jay Rosenstein, journalism professor and producer of "In Whose Honor?", about the history of Indian mascots and the significance of the U.S. patent's office cancelation of the Washington Redskins' trademark.

A video of a staircase used by thousands to get to and from Rio's Maracana stadium shows the structure wobbling unnervingly as spectators left the World Cup game between Argentina and Bosnia on Sunday.

The structure, built on scaffolding, can be seen swaying as fans grab a shaking hand rail. The stairs are the only exit leading to the subway.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has revoked the trademark of the NFL's Washington Redskins, after ruling in a case brought by five Native Americans who say the name disparages them. While the decision could have wide repercussions, it does not require the team to change its name. It is also subject to appeal, which the team has confirmed it will pursue.

You know, it is the 21st century, and it is possible to acknowledge that and make both the World Cup and the Olympics more affordable. The current waste and opulence simply aren't defensible anymore.

For the soccer pooh-bahs to demand that Brazil build new stadiums, costing billions of dollars, is unconscionable. How much more logical to utilize existing stadiums in neighboring countries, in large cities like Buenos Aires, Montevideo and Santiago.

The name John Anthony Brooks likely didn't ring a bell for many Americans before Monday.

But by minute 87 of the U.S. vs. Ghana game, John Brooks had become America's newest national hero.

Robyn Mendenhall Gardner was amazed when what started off as a monthlong ab workout challenge between friends and family caught fire on the Web.

The Montana mother of eight told Shots she came across a 30-day ab fitness plan online and, after having a tough time finishing it, turned it into a Facebook event to motivate herself.

Editors' Note: This post has been revised to clarify and correct reporting on the findings of the bike helmet study. The researchers looked at head injuries, not just brain injuries, so the descriptions have been changed to head injuries throughout. The lead researcher said in response to follow-up questions that the study was designed to look at the risk of head injuries as a proportion of all injuries related to bicycling, so the headline and descriptions of the work have been changed to reflect that distinction.

Update at 4:31 p.m. ET

And Brazil does recover, with a goal from star Neymar a few minutes later.

Update at 4:28 p.m. ET

The beautiful game is not so beautiful for Brazil in the early moments of the game: Croatia is ahead 1-0 after an own goal by the home team. It's early, though. Plenty of time for Brazil to recover.

[A tweet from NPR's Russell Lewis in Sao Paulo.]

Update at 10:25 a.m. ET

How Karate Helped Local Sensei Escape Abuse

Jun 11, 2014
Courtesy of Joni Sharrah

Joni Sharrah runs a dojo in Shoreline, north of Seattle. A teacher for 30 years, she knows that karate transcends punching and kicking. That's because experience has taught her that karate can save a person’s life – physically and emotionally.

Flickr Photo/David Geller (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle Times reporter Geoff Baker about what ex-Microsoft CEO Steve Balmer's bid to buy the LA Clippers means for Seattle's chances to land an NBA team.

Shelly Sterling says her family's trust has reached a deal to sell the Los Angeles Clippers to former Microsoft executive Steve Ballmer for $2 billion. The wife of embattled Clippers owner Donald Sterling issued a news release announcing a "binding contract" Thursday night.

"I am delighted that we are selling the team to Steve, who will be a terrific owner," Shelly Sterling said in the news release. "We have worked for 33 years to build the Clippers into a premiere NBA franchise. I am confident that Steve will take the team to new levels of success."

RadioActive Interviews Women Of Influence In Every Day Life

May 29, 2014
Courtesy of Joni Sharrah

We all know influential females. In this month's podcast, we highlight two such women who are making a difference in the lives of the people around them. The first is a new mom who gave birth to her son at the age of 19. The other is a sensei who teaches karate in Shoreline.

RadioActive is KUOW's program for high school students. Listen to RadioActive stories, subscribe to the RadioActive podcast and stay in touch on Facebook.

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