Left to right: Donald Watts and Professor Eric Davis at Naked City Brewery
Photo credit: Matt Owens

Amateur and professional sports bring out the fan, and sometimes the fanatic, in people worldwide. Athletes are modern-day gladiators. So it shouldn’t surprise us when Bellevue College professor Eric Davis says that “sports is essentially a reflection of the best of who we are and the worst of who we are.”

It took nearly four decades, but a horse has once again attained the honor that some call the most difficult achievement in sports: American Pharoah, after winning the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness Stakes, ran to victory in the Belmont Stakes as well.

He's the first Triple Crown winner since 1978. With his win, a total of 12 horses have now achieved the feat.

American Pharoah took the lead early in the mile-and-a-half long race, with Frosted close on his tail. From there, the colt never gave up the front position.

The first stage of the inaugural 750-mile Race to Alaska -- a non-motorized endurance race up the Inside Passage -- has thinned the field.

They say there's nothing more boring than watching grass grow. But cultivating immaculate grass is a serious, intense and fascinating business when you work at the golf course that will stage the first U.S. Open championship in the Northwest.

The corruption investigations swirling around soccer's world governing body could cast a shadow over the FIFA Women's World Cup. It kicks off Saturday in Canada.

Marcie Sillman talks to Jake Beattie, executive director of the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend, about the Race to Alaska, in which contestants row, paddle or sail 750 miles to Ketchikan, Alaska. 

BC Place in Vancouver will host many of the Women's World Cup games, including the final on July 5.
Flickr Photo/BC Gov Photos (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the FIFA Women's World Cup, which begins in Canada on Saturday, June 6.

Chambers Bay golf course in Tacoma, Washington.
Flickr Photo/Atomic Taco (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks to John Ladenburg,  former Pierce County executive, about his dream to bring the U.S. Open to Pierce County and the golf course at Chambers Bay his administration built to do that.

The League of Legends World Championship in 2012. In 2014, the World Championship attracted 27 million viewers.
Flickr Photo/Chris Yunker (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Click. Click. Clickclickclick. Click.

This is the sound of practice to Robert Chung. He’s moving a character around with a mouse, trying to kill minions for gold while avoiding his opponent.

He is part of a new generation of enthusiasts who play a new type of sport: competitive video gaming. Competitions are massive, filling up sports arenas and drawing millions more spectators online.  

Organizers of the U.S. Open men's golf championship are exuding confidence that Chambers Bay Golf Course overlooking Puget Sound will be ready for the tee off in less than three weeks.

Attention seagulls: neither of the creatures shown here are Wayne Kinslow.
Flickr Photo/Yuri Levchenko (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Wayne Kinslow about surpassing 1,000 days swimming in Puget Sound.

At an elementary school outside the Chinese capital, Beijing, first-graders practice controlling soccer balls under the instruction of American coach Tom Byer.

"When I clap, everybody's going to dribble to the circle, pull it back and go to the right. Go!" he says.

Regular soccer balls would practically come up to the kids' knees, so they practice with miniature ones instead.

But Byer, a native of New York, argues that even at age 6 or 7, the children are already late to the game.

Jennie Reed rides during qualification for an individual pursuit race in London on Feb. 18, 2012.
Flickr Photo/Marc (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Seattle-area resident Jennie Reed thought that after a world championship and two Olympics, she was ready to end her racing career in track cycling.

But when a fellow racer asked her to be part of the first-ever women's Olympic cycling team pursuit event, Reed decided to answer the call.

Days after a lengthy report found it was "more probable than not" that New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady knew of rule-breaking, the NFL has issued its punishment: a four-game suspension for Brady and a $1 million fine for the Patriots.

Brady will sit out the first four games of the 2015 regular season without pay, the NFL says, citing "conduct detrimental to the integrity of the NFL."

Updated at 1:50 a.m. EDT Sunday: Mayweather wins

Floyd Mayweather Jr.maintained his unbeaten record with a unanimous decision victory over Manny Pacquaio in their unified welterweight megabout in Las Vegas on Saturday.

The 38-year-old American made a surprisingly strong start, then withstood some aggressive counter-punching by the Filipino southpaw in the later rounds as he improved his career record to 48-0.