sports

Commentator: Stop Talking About Hope Solo

Sep 24, 2014
Flickr Photo/Love @ll (CC-BY-NC-ND)

 Jeannie Yandel speaks with ESPNW columnist Kate Fagan about how the public and the media should treat the allegations of domestic abuse against Seattle Reign player Hope Solo, and what the charges mean in comparison to similar allegations against National Football League players.

AP Photo/John Froschauer

Yesterday, at the end of the fourth quarter, the Seattle Seahawks and Denver Broncos were tied. That triggered overtime. The referee tossed a coin, Denver's quarterback called tails and it was heads. So Seattle got the ball, scored a touchdown -- and the game was over.

That’s it.

Denver never got the ball, never got a chance to score.

Wikipedia Photo/Eric Enfermero

Ross Reynolds talks with John U. Bacon, sports commentator for Michigan Public Radio, about Seattle Mariners manager Lloyd McClendon, who previously coached the Detroit Tigers.

The Western Hockey League opens its regular season next weekend. The players you'll see on the ice are mostly teenagers. That fact has state labor investigators asking if the four Washington teams are breaking child labor laws.

AP Photo/Nick Wass, File

Marcie Sillman speaks with Merril Cousin, executive director of the King County Coalition Against Domestic Violence, about the complexities of celebrity and domestic violence.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Steve Wilkinson, a member of the U.S. Professional Tennis Association Hall of Fame. He was the winningest coach in college tennis while at Gustavus Adolphus College for 39 years from 1971 to 2009.  

Flickr Photo/scottlum (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Sport Press Northwest co-founder Art Thiel about his new book about the Seattle Seahawks' Super Bowl-winning quarterback called "Russell Wilson: Standing Tall."

KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

There's a frenzy in Pioneer Square this afternoon. A free concert with Pharrell Williams and Sound Garden will be staged before the Super Bowl-winning Seattle Seahawks kick off their season at Century Link Field against the Green Bay Packers at 5:30.

Wikimedia Commons

The UW home football seasons opens this Saturday, and 60,000 fans are expected at Husky Stadium to see the Huskies host the Eastern Washington Eagles.

Now imagine all those fans packed into the Montlake coliseum and screaming – not for touchdowns – but for the murder of Roman slaves.

Football season has kicked off another round of scrutiny over how professional sports teams use Native American mascots. But in eastern Washington, a minor league baseball team has earned the approval of its native namesake.

Avista Stadium in Spokane is full of the familiar sights, sounds and smells of baseball. And then, there are things that might make you do a double take.

Re-branding in two languages

KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

Ross Reynolds talks with e-sport champion Yiliang "DoubleLift" Peng about the hard path he took to becoming a professional gamer.

Flickr Photo/Sean Dreilinger (CC-BY-NC-ND)

What a week! A website we've never heard of is snapped up by Amazon for a billion dollars. Called Twitch, it allows people to watch other people play video games.

Also, Weyerhaeuser announces it's moving its forest to the big city, Burger King buys out a Canadian institution and we ask, are Seahawks fans becoming spoil sports?

Bill Radke discusses those issues and more with our panel of journalists: Crosscut's Knute Berger, The Stranger's Eli Sanders, Civic Cocktail's Joni Balter and LiveWire's Luke Burbank.

Courtesy of Seattle Reign FC/Jane G. Photography

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle Reign FC captain Keelin Winters about her path into professional sports and what it's like to play for the National Women's Soccer League in Seattle. The team has had a standout season this year. After posting the best record in the league, their Laura Harvey was named coach of the year and Kim Little was the league MVP. The team plays for the championship on Sunday at Starfire stadium Tukwila.

Sports In The Age Of HIV And Aids

Aug 15, 2014

After a week of running, jumping, figure skating and even sport dancing, the International Gay Games wrap up tomorrow in Cleveland.

When the Gay Games began in 1982, HIV/AIDS had just been recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 36 million people have died from the disease. An equal number live with HIV.

Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington President Michael Young for an annual check-in. In this installment, he discusses sexual assault policies and the state of athletic compensation at the university.

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