Sea-Tac Airport

John and Linda Beatty of Seattle watch Foss Maritime tugs pull the Polar Pioneer oil rig south past Discovery Park toward the Port of Seattle's Terminal 5 on May 14, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

The Shell oil rig that occupied a terminal at the Port of Seattle is gone now.

But its legacy lives on, as candidates for the Port of Seattle Commission square off about the port’s future. An all-candidates meeting was held Monday night. 

Takeoff at Sea-Tac airport
Flickr Photo/Alan Turkus (CC BY 2.0)

International travel from Sea-Tac Airport is expected to grow by a quarter over the next five years. So the Port of Seattle is getting serious about expanding facilities for international passengers.

You’d think airlines would be happy about that, but many of them went to the Port Commission meeting Tuesday to protest. 

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

A labor dispute with dock workers has led to slowdowns and backups at West Coast ports. One part of the Port of Seattle's cargo business is booming. KUOW's John Ryan reports.

Delta Air Lines CEO Richard Anderson said his company wants to nearly double its footprint at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.

KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

At the Alaska Airlines ticket counter at Sea-Tac Airport, parents Ron and Christine Vega wait for their boarding passes.

Their son, Gibson, 5, carries a blue backpack that has essentials for a mock airplane trip: snacks, things to keep him preoccupied and a white cloth towel that helps him deal with stress.

Can two airlines be partners and rivals at the same time? Seattle-based Alaska Airlines and Delta Air Lines are long-term contractual allies. But now the relationship is being tested.

The Washington Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Washington employers must “reasonably” accommodate the religious practices of their employees.

The parent company of Alaska Airlines and Horizon Air announced strong earnings for the first quarter of the year on Friday.

Flickr Photo/The All-Nite Images

Marcie Sillman talks with Jack Temple, a National Employment Law Project policy analyst, about the movement to raise the minimum wage and why states are starting to take action.

$15 Minimum Wage Proponents To Appeal Court Decision

Dec 30, 2013
A view from inside Sea-Tac airport.
Flickr Photo/Nancy White (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Heather Weiner, Yes! for SeaTac campaign spokeswoman, about the next steps after a King County Superior Court Judge ruled the minimum wage law would not apply to employees who work inside the Sea-Tac airport.

Flickr Photo/Alan Turkus

Three weeks after Election Day, supporters of a measure to increase the minimum hourly wage to $15 in SeaTac celebrated their victory. With the last batch of votes counted, King County declared the proposition had passed with more than 1 percent of the vote.

Flickr Photo/Alan Turkus

Suwanee Pringle, a worker at a shop at Sea-Tac International Airport, lights up at the mention of Proposition 1, which would raise her wage to $15 an hour.

"I’m really going to be happy, " Pringle said. "So I can afford to pay all my bills. Now I cannot afford to eat. I eat a cup of noodles even though I work so hard."

Flickr Photo/Tom Collines

For federal employees, Tuesday is payday. But because of the partial government shutdown thousands of federal employees are getting a reduced paycheck.

An initiative to raise the minimum wage in the City of SeaTac will appear on the November ballot. A ruling Friday from a state appeals court cleared the path for the measure to move forward.

SeaTac’s Prop 1 initiative aims to set a minimum wage at $15 an hour for many workers at and around the airport, like baggage handlers and hotel staff.

Flickr Photo/ellenm1

Puget Sound Sage's latest report finds that Sea-Tac Airport has fallen behind when it comes to minimum worker pay when compared to some other West Coast airports.

How do Sea-Tac's wages compare to the national average, and if workers at the airport were to get raises who would bear the brunt of that cost? Ross Reynolds talks with Puget Sound Sage researcher and policy analyst Nicole Keenan.

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