race

The Selma to Montgomery March in 1965. Martin Luther King, Jr. is at center.
Public Domain

In March 1965, Steven Graves was studying in a Unitarian seminary in Chicago when he learned Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was asking people from around the country to gather in Selma, Alabama, to march for voting rights for black people.

Graves asked himself an important question that would change his life path.

Asha Gobana says a man pointed a gun at her and made anti-Muslim threats.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones / KUOW

A Muslim advocacy group in Seattle wants the FBI to investigate a possible hate crime against a woman in SeaTac. The group says it’s concerned about a recent spate of similar incidents, as KUOW’s Liz Jones reports.

Customers line up at Starbucks, all the way outside.
Flickr Photo/oinonio (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks to branding consultant Kevin Paul Scott about the backlash to Starbucks' #RaceTogether initiative, and why it might still be a good idea.

Students study in a Singapore Starbucks.
Flickr Photo/Nicola Sapiens De Mitri (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Yoonsun Choi, University of Chicago professor, about the "model minority" myth and why lumping Asian students in one category makes it harder for people to succeed. 

Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird, around 1962. The sequel to her book is due out in July.
Wikimedia Commons

Harper Lee’s second book will be out in July – will librarian Nancy Pearl grab the first available copy?

“You know, I don’t want to be disappointed,” Pearl said when we asked her on Tuesday. “I will definitely hold it in my hands and start reading it. But there’s always a chance that maybe there was a reason it wasn’t published.”

Since his arrest last year, William Wingate, a 70-year-old veteran and retired bus driver, no longer stands up for the Seattle Police Department in conversations with his siblings.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Seattle Police officer involved in a case involving the arrest of a senior citizen has been reassigned to a job where she has no contact with the public.

The move follows public outcry over a dashboard video showing the arrest of William Wingate, an elderly black man who had been standing on a Capitol Hill corner, leaning on his golf club.

Challenging The Whiteness Of Public Radio

Jan 30, 2015

Editor's Note: This essay originally appeared on Transom.org, with a shorter version published on BuzzFeed. Author Chenjerai Kumanyika will join Code Switch — along with African-American public radio journalists — in a Twitter chat Thursday moderated by lead blogger Gene Demby. Join Code

Marcie Sillman talks with non-violence trainer Jonathan 'Globe' Lewis about practicing non-violence. Also, Sillman speaks with University of Washington communications professor David Domke about civil rights and how King County can live up to its namesake. 

RadioActive producer Jaylen Wheeler at a RadioActive listening party.
KUOW Photo / Jason Pagano

I’ve done this a million times: Wake up, get ready, drive to school.

At first, I hated getting up so early for school every day. It only made it worse that it took me an hour to get there. It would have been easier if it was five minutes away.

Marcie Sillman talks with Diane Langdon, who has helped organize marches to defend police officers' reputation in the wake of recent protests against police use-of-force. 

'Papa, you are brown, and I am white'

Dec 26, 2014
Courtesy of Deepak Singh

I'm the father of a 5-year-old girl whose skin color is several shades lighter than my own.

Her eyes aren't black like mine; they're an icy blue. She has blond streaks in her hair. And most people say she doesn't look like me — though my mother thinks she does. Like most Indians who value light skin, my mother worries my daughter might turn dark if she plays in the sun too long.

Professor Ralina Joseph at the University of Washington says to just start talking about race.
University of Washington

Protests over high profile police shootings have renewed calls to discuss police treatment of African-Americans – and talk about race relations in general. But how do we have those difficult and often awkward conversations? KUOW’s Jamala Henderson put that question to University of Washington Professor Ralina Joseph. Highlights from the interview:

How do I talk about race with family and friends?

Santa Is Magic And Can Be Any Race You Imagine

Dec 23, 2014
An Artherton Elementary School student sings for a Make-A-Wish child for National Believe Day at on Friday, Dec. 12, 2014, in Houston.
AP Photo/Aaron M. Sprecher

Ross Reynolds talks with Debra Sullivan, president of the Seattle chapter of the Black Child Development Institute, about why having multiracial Santa Clauses is good for children.

The voices in the Whiteness Project vary by gender, age and income, but they all candidly express what it is like to be white in an increasingly diverse country.

"I don't feel that personally I've benefited from being white. That's because I grew up relatively poor," a participant shared. "My father worked at a factory." These are the kinds of unfiltered comments that filmmaker Whitney Dow was hoping to hear when he started recording a group of white people, and hoped to turn their responses into provocative, interactive videos.

Protesters in response to the Ferguson and Eric Garner grand jury decisions converge on downtown Seattle on Dec. 4, 2014.
Flickr Photo/Scott Lum (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Rory McVeigh, director of the Center for the Study of Social Movements at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, about how the Ferguson-inspired protests can evolve into a movement for lasting change.

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