race

My parents are Cuban and Panamanian. I grew up in Miami. I travel broadly in Latin America but reside in Brazil, which speaks Portuguese, not Spanish.

So what am I?

This may seem an irrelevant question to many, but as the American presidential season kicks into high gear there's been a lot of confusion about how to refer to people alternately called Hispanics or Latinos.

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Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

The Portland Development Commission this week launched a $3 million fund to invest in startups founded by women and minorities.

Ross Reynolds interviews Larry Gossett and Bob Santos, two members of Seattle’s "Gang of Four." In the social turmoil of the 1960s and 70s, four Seattle political activists came of age: Roberto Maestas from the Latino community, Native American activist Bernie Whitebear , Bob Santos of the Asian community, and African American leader Larry Gossett.

Santos is the co-author of “Gang of Four: Four Leaders. Four Communities. One Friendship."

Former NAACP chairman Julian Bond takes part in the "Heroes of the Civil Rights Movement" panel during the Civil Rights Summit on Wednesday, April 9, 2014, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Jack Plunkett)
AP Photo/Jack Plunkett

Julian Bond, a leading civil rights activist and anti-war campaigner who helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and later served as chairman of the NAACP, has died at age 75.

In 2008, Bond spoke with Steve Scher, then host of the KUOW program Weekday. He told Scher that nonviolence was an “overwhelmingly effective weapon.”

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

Julian Bond, a key civil rights activist and anti-war campaigner who helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and later served for years as the chairman of the NAACP, has died at age 75.

The Southern Poverty Law Center, where Bond served as president in the 1970s, announced his death in a statement on Sunday. The SPLC said Bond died Saturday evening in Fort Walton Beach, Fla.

Activists from the Seattle chapter of Black Lives Matter took over the stage at a rally for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders on Sat., Aug 8, 2015. They called for four minutes of silence, and Sanders left the stage to greet those who had come to see him.
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

When two black women stormed a Seattle rally for Sen. Bernie Sanders last week, the crowd booed and shouted at them to get off the stage. The women refused to back down.

“Now you've covered yourselves and your white supremacist liberalism,” one yelled back.

In this season of anger in many black communities that are reacting to police brutality, we're remembering the largest urban riot of the civil rights era.

Fifty years ago this week in Los Angeles, the African-American neighborhood of Watts exploded after a young black man was arrested for drunken driving. His mother scuffled with officers and was also arrested, all of which drew an increasingly hostile crowd.

If you want to get a sense of how complex racial identity is in Brazil, you should meet sisters Francine and Fernanda Gravina. Both have the same mother and father. Francine, 28, is blond with green eyes and white skin. She wouldn't look out of place in Iceland. But Fernanda, 23, has milk chocolate skin with coffee colored eyes and hair. Francine describes herself as white, whereas Fernanda says she's morena, or brown-skinned.

An event organizer, left, tries to persuade two women who had taken over the microphone from Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., back right, to relinquish it at a rally Saturday, Aug. 8, 2015.`
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

David Hyde talks with Native American writer and activist Gyasi Ross about how he ended up on the stage at Westlake when two Black Lives Matters activists disrupted a Bernie Sanders rally and what he thinks about their actions.

Activists from the Seattle chapter of Black Lives Matter took over the stage at a rally for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders on Sat., Aug 8, 2015. They called for four minutes of silence, and Sanders left the stage to greet those who had come to see him.
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

How Seattle reacted to the disruption of Bernie Sanders’ appearance at a rally this weekend reveals the city is still unwilling to honestly talk about race, an NAACP leader said Monday.

Gerald Hankerson, president of Seattle-King County NAACP, told KUOW’s Todd Mundt that the incident shows that’s “a difficult conversation to have, even with your allies.”

Marchers walk through the Central Area on Sunday night during a protest in support of Black Lives Matter. It was the anniversary of the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

People marching in a Black Lives Matter protest in Seattle on Sunday said they were upset by how a largely white crowd reacted to the disruption of Bernie Sanders’ rally the day before.

Bernie Sanders, senator from Vermont and presidential candidate, and Councilmember Kshama Sawant at a rally held at Westlake Center on Saturday evening.
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

SEATTLE (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders spoke to a packed crowd Saturday night at the University of Washington campus about his commitment to criminal justice reform as well as addressing income equality.

A year after Michael Brown, an unarmed black 18-year-old, was fatally shot by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo., sparking weeks of often violent protests in the city, the country is still struggling to deal with the issues the shooting, and others like it, have brought to the fore.

No one is certain exactly how the protest chant "hands up, don't shoot" got started, though Tory Russell says he has a good idea. Russell is co-founder of Hands Up United, an activist group which formed after the death of Michael Brown, the 18-year-old black man who was fatally shot by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo., last August.

"It came after Dorian Johnson, the guy that was with Mike Brown, and others said that Mike Brown had his hands up," Russell says.

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