race

Can we make the wilderness less white?

22 minutes ago
Flickr Photo/Steve Snodgrass (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e2A4sb

Bill Radke speaks with Jourdan Keith, founder and director of Urban Wilderness Works, about why she leads young people of color on 17-day camping trips in the North Cascades National Park.   

As the Obama presidency draws to a close, white and black Americans are deeply divided on views of race relations in the United States, according to a new survey from the Pew Research Center.

The report, titled On Views of Race and Inequality, Blacks and Whites are Worlds Apart, found that just 8 percent of black Americans say the changes needed to achieve racial equality for blacks in the U.S. have already been made, while nearly 40 percent of white Americans say the same thing.

Marchers on Thur. Feb 25 protested the killing of Che Taylor by the Seattle Police, shot on Feb. 22.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Bill Radke talks to Seattle Times criminal justice reporter Steve Miletich about the Seattle Police Department force review board's finding on the shooting of Che Taylor. 

Marijuana is legal in Colorado — as long as you're 21 or older. It's still illegal for kids to possess, so juveniles are coming to dominate the marijuana arrests in Colorado. But another startling trend also has developed: Arrest rates have risen dramatically for young blacks and Latinos.

Ricky Montoya isn't surprised that's happening. He's standing outside Courtroom 4F in Denver's City and County Building, where he was just ordered to pay a $1,000 fine for his third marijuana possession offense.

Online editor Isolde Raftery reads an old residential ledger at the Puget Sound Regional Branch of the Washington State Archives in Bellevue.
KUOW Photo/Amina Al-Sadi

First, an admission.

We were clueless when we started researching the house at 1643 South King Street in Seattle's International District.

Activists and anarchists lived at 1643 King Street for at least 40 years. They called it the King Street Collective.
Courtesy of Ronni Tartlet

If this house could talk, what stories would it tell?

About the Irish-American couple that first owned it?

And the Japanese family sent to an internment camp?

Or the anarchists that played drums during the WTO protests?


A coalition of Asian-American groups recently requested that the U.S. Department of Education investigate several Ivy League schools for discrimination. The group claims Asian-American applicants need higher SAT scores than other racial groups to get into these schools.

Do Asian-Americans face a different set of rules than everyone else? Youth Radio’s Amber Ly reports from San Francisco.

Read more on this story via Youth Radio

The nation's colleges and universities have been on pins and needles waiting for the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether race can be a factor in their admissions policies.

And so today's 4-3 ruling upholding the affirmative-action program at the University of Texas at Austin brought a sigh of relief to much of the higher education world.

New Census numbers out Thursday reinforce a trend a you’ve probably noticed: The state’s population is booming. Washington ranks fifth for states that added the most new residents in the past year.

Mississippi officials are closing the investigation into the murder of three young civil rights workers by the Ku Klux Klan — more than 50 years after the men disappeared. The case had been closed for decades, then reopened after renewed public outcry. Now it's going cold again.

"It's just gotten to the point that it's 52 years later and we've done all we can do," Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood said Monday.

KUOW Photo / Feven Mekonenn

We all remember the influential teacher who made a difference in our lives. But for Drego Little, the teacher that changed his life was the one he hated most.


Jasmine Jackson (left) recommends events in Seattle, Alaina Caldwell (center) recommends restaurants, and Eula Scott Bynoe (right) interviews the people to know about.
Courtesy of 'Hella Black Hella Seattle'

Bill Radke speaks with Eula Scott Bynoe, Alaina Caldwell and Jasmine Jackson, the three women behind the Seattle-centric podcast Hella Black Hella Seattle. The podcast is a short-run summer series all about how people (especially people of color) can get out, have fun, and create community while the weather is warm.

The U.S. Men’s National Team poses ahead of a Copa America match against Paraguay on June 11.
AP Photo/Matt Rourke

The eyes of the soccer world are on Seattle this week for the COPA America Tournament. On Tuesday, a diverse crowd poured into CenturyLink field to watch the world’s top-ranked men’s national team, Argentina, take on Bolivia.

The U.S. Men's National Team plays in Seattle in a quarterfinal match Thursday night. Millions are expected to watch the game in the U.S.

Ricquel Sears of Capitol Hill with her 3-month-old daughter. For Sears, the Orlando shooting hit home. Her brother is gay, and her fiance is Muslim.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

At a vigil Sunday night, Seattleites shared their thoughts about the Orlando shooting that occurred earlier that morning. Ricquel Sears of Capitol Hill, who was at the park with her two children, said her heart dropped:

"My brother is homosexual. It sucks that you would kill someone just because of that. Not only one or two people, but you tried to kill over 100 people.


'Week in Review' panel Marcus Green, Knute Berger, Erica C. Barnett and Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray has a reputation for being a hothead. How should we react to his controversial behavior with city council members?

Also this week, we posted an essay by a Seattle University professor who had a racially-charged encounter in a Seattle Starbucks. Is this a racial story or a Seattle story?

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