politics | KUOW News and Information


This ballot's stamp game is on point.

Let’s repeat that, in case you skimmed over the headline: 

Your ballot will be counted even if you DO NOT affix a stamp to the envelope. 

Linda Brewster of Port Townsend is in Seattle to make some phone calls for I-735.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Linda Brewster lives in Port Townsend, but today she traveled to Seattle to make phone calls for Initiative 735. She estimates she's dedicated over 1,500 hours of her life to this campaign.

Pramila Jayapal and Brady Walkinshaw agree on the issues for the most part. Walkinshaw notes that his contributions come mostly from within Washington state; Jayapal rebuts that she is running for national office.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Kim Malcolm talks with Publicola's Josh Feit about the 7th Congressional District race between Pramila Jayapal and Brady Walkinshaw. This week, Jayapal's campaign accused Walkinshaw's campaign of putting out a dishonest and misleading TV ad. Feit is political editor at Seattle Met Magazine where we writes the blog, Publicola.

A political action committee largely funded by three wealthy Washingtonians has unleashed a hard-hitting attack on a state Supreme Court justice up for re-election. The TV ad suggests Justice Charlie Wiggins is soft on crime.

JZ Knight claims to channel a 35,000-year-old warrior-spirit named Ramtha.
Ramtha's School of Enlightenment

Controversial "spirit channeler"JZ Knight of Yelm has channeled another $54,000 into Washington state politics.

Knight claims to channel a 35,000-year-old warrior-spirit named Ramtha and charges believers up to $5,000 to spend a day with "Ramtha the Enlightened One" at her school in Yelm.

Wikimedia Commons

We don’t know how much Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton raised on her fund-raising visit to Seattle on Friday — her campaign doesn’t have to report its haul to the Federal Election Commission until Oct. 27. (Tickets to see her with Macklemore and Ryan Lewis at the 2,807-seat Paramount Theater ranged from $250 to $27,000.)

But we do know that presidential campaigns often use Seattle as a sort of campaign ATM, a reliable place to extract cash from high-end donors.

Pramila Jayapal and Brady Walkinshaw agree on the issues for the most part. Walkinshaw notes that his contributions come mostly from within Washington state; Jayapal rebuts that she is running for national office.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Campaigning before The Breakfast Group, a civic organization for African-American men, Brady Piñero Walkinshaw admitted that they had a choice between “two great progressives.”

He was referring to himself – a state representative from Capitol Hill – and Pramila Jayapal, state senator from Columbia City.

Eileen Simpkins is with her.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Braving a major storm, around 2,000 Hillary Clinton supporters waited in line in rain and wind to see their candidate in downtown Seattle.

Even shelling out at least $250 for the event at the Paramount Theatre didn't dampen their enthusiasm.

After a month of student-led democracy protests in central Hong Kong in 2014, there was a moment when the students and Hong Kong's government seemed to be on the verge of actually agreeing on something.

"At one important juncture, the student leaders asked me to talk to senior [Hong Kong] government officials to explore the possibilities of conducting a debate," says Hong Kong University Political Science professor Joseph Chan.

With Chan's coaxing, the Hong Kong government, which was pro-China, agreed.

We provided bingo cards at our debate viewing party to add a little more excitement to the action.
KUOW/Lisa Wang

While Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were duking it out on Sunday night, you were watching.

Some of you were at a presidential debate-viewing party sponsored by KUOW and Humanities Washington at Naked City Brewery in Seattle's Greenwood neighborhood. (And if you weren't, you can always come to our last viewing party on October 19.)

Afterward, KUOW's Ross Reynolds gathered reactions from some of the people there, including Ryan Weber, Kate Zodrow and Satya (last name not given).

'Week in Review' panel Josh Feit, Sarah Stuteville, Joni Balter and Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Are liberal lobbyists writing Seattle's laws? Should Washington put a carbon tax on fossil fuels? And what can Vancouver, B.C. teach Seattle about safe injection sites for drug users?

We'll talk about these stories and more on KUOW's Week in Review. Listen to the live discussion Fridays at noon and follow the online discussion @KUOW and #KUOWwir. 

Donald Trump speaks at a rally in Xfinity Arena in Everett on Tuesday night.

Donald Trump said he’s got a good reason to bring his anti-TPP, anti-refugee rhetoric to Boeing country.

“They say Republicans don’t win Washington state, but we’re going to win it,” Trump told the crowd Tuesday night at Xfinity Arena in Everett. “That’s why I’m here.”

Boeing worker Michael McNeil waits in line Tuesday afternoon to get into Everett's Xfinity Arena to hear Donald Trump speak.

Fans of Donald Trump lined up by the thousands to hear him speak at a rally Tuesday evening in Everett.

They were met by protesters who said his policies would be bad for Boeing, minorities, women and the country in general.

Bernie Sanders is launching a new political organization. It's called Our Revolution. It aims to support candidates and, according to its website, "advance the progressive agenda that we believe in."

But the revolution is getting off to a rocky start.

Eight key staffers abruptly resigned over the weekend in a dispute over the group's leadership and legal structure.

Sanders himself is set to address followers on Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET for the launch of the group. You can watch that here:

Gov. Jay Inslee, left, a Democrat, and Bill Bryant, his Republican opponent.
Campaign photographs

The first Washington gubernatorial debate of the season happened yesterday. Incumbent Gov. Jay Inslee – a Democrat –  faced off against former Seattle Port Commissioner and Republican Bill Bryant out in Spokane.