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politics

Americans continue to be divided along partisan lines over Obamacare, with an overwhelming percentage of Democrats favoring it and an equal share of Republicans having unfavorable views, according to a newly released Kaiser Family Foundation poll.

But when it comes to an actual gutting of Obamacare, there's doesn't appear to be a lot of support.

In Lucia Neare's world, a horse can deliver balloons via rowboat
Photo by Michael Doucett

When Seattle artist Lucia Neare heard who won the election last month, she was despondent. 

Neare walked out of her home in the Central District and across the street to a traffic circle. There, she unleashed a full-throttled howl of despair into the night.

Most donors to this year's ballot measure gave at least this much money ($10,000).
FLICKR PHOTO/KEITH COOPER (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/dK2osL

The winners and losers in Washington's elections become official once counties certify their results Tuesday, November 29. Then there are the unofficial winners – who won’t be publicized.

Initiative 1464 on the 2016 general election ballot.
KUOW PHOTO/JOHN RYAN

Two campaigns on the Washington ballot this year stood out for failing despite spending lots of money. Hillary Clinton’s campaign raised twice as much money nationally as Donald Trump’s and lost (though she did win the state). The other big-money defeat didn't make big headlines.


Updated at 5:55 p.m. ET

The Wisconsin Elections Commission announced Friday that it would hold a statewide recount of the presidential vote. The move was in response to petitions from two candidates, the Green Party's Jill Stein and independent Rocky Roque De La Fuente.

Federal law requires that all recounts be finished 35 days after the election, which is Dec. 13. One or both of the candidates will be required to pay for the recount.

C
Emma Jacobs

It has been an eventful political week in France, which has its presidential election scheduled for the spring of 2017. Voting began last Sunday in the two-round primary for the center-right parties. But this year, the French political left has been paying extra attention — and in some cases, participating.

With incumbent socialist President Francois Hollande very unpopular, some left-wing voters believe they will eventually be casting final ballots this spring for the right’s candidate, against the far-right’s Marine Le Pen.

What’s worse than a divisive election year?

For some, talking about it with extended family at Thanksgiving.

That’s why we set up a mock Thanksgiving table at Solstice Café in the U District last week. We invited community members into a safe space—or at least somewhere they wouldn't be interrupted—to share what’s really on their mind after this divisive election season. 

We asked them: “What are you nervous to discuss with your family this Thanksgiving?” Listen to some of the responses in this video: 

Flickr Photo/dcJohn (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/7iCjJU

Bill Radke speaks with  Luke Burbank, host of the public radio show Live Wire, about how he plans to handle family, politics and stuffing this Thanksgiving. They also listen to calls from listeners about how they are tackling a fraught holiday.

During the presidential campaign, Donald Trump promised the biggest tax cut since Ronald Reagan's conservative revolution swept into Washington in the 1980s.

A big part of that tax cut would go to corporations. The president-elect says that will fuel investment and growth. Skeptics say the plan would explode the federal budget deficit.

Top business tax rate slashed

Washington Democratic Congresswoman Suzan DelBene
Flickr Photo/Ronald Woan (CC by NC 2.0) / https://flic.kr/p/qihx7g

U.S. Representative Suzan DelBene (D-Wash.) is proposing legislation that would prohibit the federal government from creating a registry of Muslim Americans.

President-elect Donald Trump voiced support for the idea during the campaign, saying it could help guard against domestic terrorism. And the notion has picked up steam recently after a supporter for Trump suggested that such a registry would be legal.

DelBene sees it differently, and tells KUOW that the idea is disturbing.

Stephen Bannon, center left, back, campaign CEO for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, looks on as Trump speaks during a campaign rally on Election Day.
AP Photo/ Evan Vucci

In journalism, we avoid wonk.

Which is why we at KUOW discussed whether to use the term “alt-right.” Mainstream news sites have plugged it into headlines, but our readers and listeners were confused. What does that label even mean?

U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen of Washington state's 2nd District.
U.S. government

U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen speaks with KUOW's Kim Malcolm about Donald Trump's choice of Breitbart chief Steve Bannon as a key strategist in the White House.


Though also a big-time real estate developer, Jared Kushner is many things that Donald Trump is not.

At 35 years old, Kushner is half Trump's age.

He is an Orthodox Jew. Trump has been accused over the course of the campaign of trafficking in anti-Semitic themes.

Kushner is understated. He shies away from the limelight. Neither of those descriptions attaches to the president-elect.

A surrogate of President-elect Donald Trump on Wednesday invoked Japanese internment camps as precedent for creating a registry for Muslim immigrants. This comes less than a week after the Kansas secretary of state told Reuters that Trump's team might reprise a post-Sept. 11 national registry of immigrants from countries regarded as havens for "extremist activity."

Such conversations in the president-elect's circles have raised new concerns about civil rights among advocates for American Muslims.

Since Donald Trump's election victory, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has come out not once, but twice, to address the issue of fake news, inaccurate or simply false information that appears on the Web in the guise of journalism.

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