politics

In the first minute of his hourlong State of the Union address, President Barack Obama summed up his theme in single sentence: "Tonight, we turn the page."

The president then detailed a page of history filled with the financial crisis of 2008, the recession and unemployment and deficits that followed and the two distant and difficult wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

It was a reminder of the ills that helped elevate young Sen. Obama to the Oval Office six years ago. And now, after many battles, he was ready to declare he had turned that page.

Incoming Texas Gov. Greg Abbott created a stir last week during a speech to the conservative and influential think tank the Texas Public Policy Foundation, where he accused Texas cities of contributing to the "California-ization" of Texas.

"The truth is, Texas is being California-ized with bag bans, fracking bans, tree-cutting bans," Abbott said. "We're forming a patchwork quilt of bans and rules and regulations that is eroding the Texas model."

U.S. Capital congress
Flickr Photo/Stephen Melkisethian (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Cathy Allen, political consultant and president of The Connections Group, about Washington state's political clout in Congress now that the majority party is Republican.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Ross Reynolds talks to Andrea Seabrook, founder of DecodeDC, about how local initiatives create laws in spite of the stalemate in Congress.

The Independent Party is on the cusp of becoming Oregon’s third major political party.

To raise taxes, or not raises taxes? That is the question. Washington Democrats have been hinting at yes. Republicans like Senate budget chair Andy Hill say it’s a last resort.

Flickr Photo/Shawn Campbell (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington philosopher Michael Blake about partyism and when it is and  isn't ok to discriminate based on political beliefs.

Former President George W. Bush is back in the spotlight. He's releasing a new book this week, called 41: A Portrait of My Father. And he's also speaking more openly about whether his brother, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, might one day run for president himself.

A federal appeals court Thursday upheld gay marriage bans in Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio and Michigan. It’s a break with the trend in most courts.

Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee, who led The Washington Post to national eminence through charm, drive, instinct and, most notably, an epic confrontation with the Nixon White House, died Tuesday. He was 93.

Ross Reynolds talks with democratic political consultant Christian Sinderman about King County Councilmember Reagan Dunn's confession of a recent DUI and his drinking problem. 

  Ross Reynolds speaks with Todd Donovan, professor of political science at Western Washington University, about U.S. representative candidate Pedro Celis' decision to hire young hotshots who helped bring down House Speaker Eric Cantor.

More Americans Are Flocking To The South

Aug 18, 2014

A new New York Times interpretation of census data looks at where Americans living in each state were born. It finds that states in the South, typically are home to many people who were born there, are for the first time seeing significant in-migration.

Several Midwestern states, including Wisconsin to Ohio, are leading the country in terms of having the highest portion of residents who were born there.

Anti-Park District Proponents Caught In A Lie

Jul 31, 2014

Ross Reynolds talks with Andrew Mannix, reporter for the Seattle Times, about his discovery that the "Our Parks Forever" campaign against the  Metropolitan Park District proposal contained some misleading numbers. The organization claimed that property taxes would increase 20 percent, but he found that simply wasn't true.

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