police

The city of Cleveland agreed Monday to pay $6 million to settle a civil rights lawsuit brought by the family of Tamir Rice, the 12-year-old boy who was shot and killed by a police officer on Nov. 22, 2014.

The city did not admit any wrongdoing in the killing of Tamir, who was holding an air pellet gun and walking outside a recreation center when he was shot by Officer Timothy Loehmann.

It has been a year since Freddie Gray died from injuries sustained as Baltimore police transported him to a station. The 25-year-old was arrested after running from police; officers later found a small knife in Gray's possession. Cellphone video of the arrest showed Gray being dragged, moaning in pain, to the police van while at least one onlooker shouted that Gray needed medical care.

Susan Lee Rahr, executive director of the Wash. State Criminal Justice Training Commission and a member of President Obama's Task Force on 21st Century Policing, being sworn in May 19, 2015, to testify before a House Judiciary Committee hearing.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

In 2014, Sue Rahr was plucked from her job running the state’s police training commission to serve on the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing. It allowed her to bring her new approach to police training before a national audience.

She said she felt like a kid getting promoted to the grownups’ table.  

Officer Stephanie Schendel asks the Whole Foods employee what the shoplifters stole.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

We met Bellevue Officer Stephanie Schendel last year, as she made her way through the Washington state police academy

When the FBI tried to force Apple to unlock an iPhone last month, it was a battle of titans. There were high-powered lawyers and dueling public relations strategies. But when police encounter a privacy technology run by volunteers, things can be a little different.

'Week in Review' panel Mike McGinn, Erica C. Barnett, Bill Radke and Keith Schipper.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Caucusers went for Sanders, so why are super-delegates backing Clinton? Can Sound Transit sell you mass transit for $27 billion? And if you don't think police will keep you safe, is it wrong to hire private security guards?

Bill Radke walks the news beat with former Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn, blogger Erica C. Barnett and GOP consultant Keith Schipper.

Suzanne Adams during her visit to KUOW.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

Bill Radke speaks with Suzanne Adams about how her experiences as a former police chief and a transgender woman have helped her train Seattle Police Department officers on how to properly interact with the trans community.  

No one knows who he is, or what may have driven him to the uppermost branches of an 80-foot Sequoia tree in downtown Seattle, but the man who scaled the landmark yesterday, captivating Seattle, was met with cheers and applause as he climbed down on Wednesday.

Hillsboro Police Department officers participate in meditation training in 2013. Lt. Richard Goerling argues that meditation can help police forces deal with stress that is constantly eroding “our emotional intelligence skill set.”
Hillsboro Police Department/Darci Vanden Hoek

Police officer Richard Goerling wasn't happy with the way he was handling the public.

“I’d leave a radio call thinking, ‘Hmm, I probably could have been more kind’ and really questioning whether or not the abrasive approach was an appropriate response,” Goerling told KUOW's Bill Radke.

He turned to yoga and meditation. It worked.

seattle traffic interstate 5 I5 transportation
Flickr Photo/Michael B. (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/98FXJS

Audio Pending...

Bill Radke speaks with Washington State Trooper Chris Webb about the agency's new emphasis on ticketing drivers who won't get out of the left lane on the freeway. 

'Week in Review' panel Pat Murakami, Gyasi Ross, Erica C. Barnett and Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Are Donald Trump's manners an issue or a distraction? Should we house the homeless first? Who should see police body camera footage? Plus, are your exclamation marks a sign that you can’t write? 

Bill Radke declaims the news with Gyasi Ross, Erica C. Barnett and Pat Murakami.

Police officers pause next to a sign outside a restaurant as they observe a May Day anti-capitalism march, Friday, May 1, 2015 in Seattle.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

A bill that would put police use-of-force under the microscope is headed to the governor for final approval. But recent amendments have stripped down the measure.  

The measure would create a task force to review policing laws. Current law says an officer can't be convicted of a crime involving deadly force unless they acted with malice.

In this image from video, a body camera worn by Seattle police officer Chris Myers is shown on June 18, 2015 in Seattle.
AP Photo/Manuel Valdes

Bill Radke talks with privacy advocate Jared Friend about a bill in the state legislature that would restrict public access to police body camera footage. Friend is director of technology and liberty at the ACLU of Washington. We also hear from state Rep. Drew Hansen, who is backing the bill.

Marchers on Thur. Feb 25 protested the killing of Che Taylor by the Seattle Police, shot on Feb. 22.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Officials at the Seattle Police Department and its civilian oversight office say so far, they have found no basis for criminal prosecution of police officers Michael Spaulding and Scott Miller in the shooting of Che Taylor on Feb. 21.

Franklin County Coroner Dan Blasdel has been fighting for a juried-review into the shooting of a Pasco, Washington, farmworker for more than a year. Wednesday, Franklin County officials promised they’d fund the inquest on the death of Antonio Zambrano-Montes.

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