police

Ross Reynolds speaks with Mike Wagers, chief operating officer at Seattle Police Department, about how an anonymous computer programmer with an outsized data request helped prompt the Seattle Police Department's first-ever Hackathon.

(Last updated at 1:48 p.m. ET.)

Just as the siege entered its second day, police stormed a chocolate shop in downtown Sydney, ending a more than 12-hour hostage standoff that began during morning rush hour.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Several hundred demonstrators gathered outside Seattle’s CenturyLink Field Sunday just as the Seahawks game against the San Francisco 49ers was getting underway. The crowd chanted "Twelfth man can't breathe! Twelfth man can't breathe!" They were protesting recent police shootings of unarmed black civilians in Ferguson and elsewhere.

Protesters in a march to the federal courthouse on Tuesday, Nov. 25, the day after a grand jury declined to indict Darren Wilson for Michael Brown's death.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Ross Reynolds talks with Lisa Daugaard, policy director for the Public Defender Association in Seattle, about business organizations' petitions for the city to require protesters to get permits first.

Seattle Police guard a building during protests on Dec. 6, 2014, in response to the killings of Michael Brown in Missouri and Eric Garner in New York.
Flickr Photo/Scott Lum (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole about the police's response to recent Seattle protests to suspected racial bias in policing. 

A 47-year-old woman was caught stealing eggs in Tarrant, Ala., over the weekend. But instead of arresting Helen Johnson, police officer William Stacy bought her a carton of eggs in exchange for a promise never to shoplift again.

That wasn't the end of it. The story garnered so much attention, that offers of donations of money, food and clothes poured in from around the world.

Protestors rally Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014 to protest the shooting of Michael Brown, 18, by police in Ferguson, Mo.Protestors rally Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014 to protest the shooting of Michael Brown, 18, by police in Ferguson, Mo.
AP Photo/Sid Hastings

Seattle attorney Jeff Robinson recently addressed a gathering at the University Of Washington School Of Law. It had been just over a week since a Ferguson, Missouri grand jury decided not to indict Officer Darren Wilson in the death of Michael Brown.

Robinson titled his talk "You Can Observe a Lot Just by Watching: The Killing of Michael Brown and the Transparent Grand Jury Investigation." 

Since the Ferguson, Mo., shooting, there have been renewed calls for police departments to hire more minority officers, but it turns out it's not that simple.

Police in the U.S. are more diverse than they were a generation ago. In the 1980s, 1 in 6 officers belonged to an ethnic or racial minority. Now it's about 1 in 4. The challenge these days is finding enough recruits to keep that trend going.

In this file photo, King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg talks to reporters at a press conference in 2009.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Ross Reynolds speaks with King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg about why he decided not to bring felony charges against Seattle Police Officer Adley Shepherd.

Shepherd punched Miyekko Durden-Bosley, 23, in the face after she resisted arrest during a domestic violence call. Durden-Bosely sustained multiple fractures to her orbital socket.

African-American clergy, academics and activists will hold a march on Washington this week, protesting the grand jury decisions in Ferguson, Mo. and New York City and call on the federal government to intervene in the prosecutions of police officers accused of unjustified use of force.

Demonstrators at a Seattle march on Nov. 25, 2014, in response to the Ferguson grand jury decision.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Marcie Sillman speaks with Sarah Stuteville, co-founder of the Seattle Globalist, about protester concerns about policing in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood.

New York Police Department officer Joshua Jones wears a VieVu body camera on his chest during a news conference, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014 in New York.
AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

Marcie Sillman talks with Vievu CEO Steve Ward, who is also a former SWAT officer with the Seattle police, about his company's body cameras that have been implemented by 4,000 police agencies nationwide. This week, President Barack Obama set aside $75 million for police agencies to purchase body cameras.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and New York Police Department Commissioner Bill Bratton have announced plans to give training to police officers to help them treat all citizens with equal respect and with equal regard for their safety.

"These changes are happening because the people demanded it," de Blasio said.

"This fight ain't over. It's just begun. I'm determined to get justice for my husband," Esaw Garner said Wednesday, "because he shouldn't have been killed in that way. He shouldn't have been killed in any way."

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle-King County NAACP President Gerald Hankerson about police reform in Seattle in the wake recent events in Ferguson, Missouri. 

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