movies

The most closed country on earth — North Korea — is now denying its involvement in one of the biggest corporate hacks in history.

Someone attacked Sony Pictures Entertainment last week and made public troves of stolen data, including five unreleased films, medical records and salaries of nearly 7,000 global employees. But before a recent denial — another North Korean diplomat played coy about the country's involvement.

"Natalie" sits in the kitchen of her parents house. She was 16 when she ran away from home and fell in love with a guy who turned out to be a pimp.
Courtesy Tim Matsui/ Alexia Foundation

The Long Night,” a documentary about child sex trafficking in the Seattle area, is being released online Monday. Sara Lerner speaks with filmmaker Tim Matsui, who says he believes exploiting minors in this way is a symptom of underlying causes.

As you may be aware, there's a hot new space movie now in theaters — Interstellar. Here's the premise: It's just a little bit in the future, conditions have become pretty horrible on Earth and some astronauts head out in search of a new planet for humans to inhabit.

What's Your Favorite Color, Sweetheart? 'The Blood'

Oct 30, 2014
Courtesy Woerner family

It's Halloween, and you probably have your own family tradition. Carving a jack-o-lantern, dressing up, eating too much candy.

For Seattleite Matt Woerner, it’s watching horror films with his 4-year-old daughter, Chloe.

1023_E-TEAMWhen wars take place around the world, Human Rights Watch is keeping an eye on them.

Photo Megan Griffiths (Courtesy Lynn Shelton)

Lynn Shelton is best known for her small, intimate movies made on location in her hometown of Seattle.

These indie films are part of a genre known as mumblecore; movies made on small budgets with small crews. Shelton has writing credits on her first five features, but much of the dialogue is improvised.

How Seattle's Scarecrow Video Is Like A Kung Fu Movie

Aug 20, 2014
Joshua McNichols / KUOW

Video stores are dead, they say.

Then how – and WHY – did the Seattle video store Scarecrow Video just raise $100,000 in a Kickstarter campaign?

How A Seattle Orangutan Inspired Hollywood

Aug 11, 2014
Courtesy of Woodland Park Zoo, Karin Konoval

Ross Reynolds talks with actress Karin Konoval about her portrayal of "Maurice," the orangutan in the last two installments of the "Planet of the Apes" franchise. She was inspired by her work with Towan, an orangutan at the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle. His keeper, Laura McComesky, also speaks about how the zoo is helping conservation efforts to protect endangered orangutans.

Flickr Photo/C.P.Storm (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with psychologist Joel Gold, who co-authored the book "Suspicious Minds: How Culture Shapes Madness." The book deals in part with the "Truman Show" delusion: a belief that everyone around you is an actor, and you're the star of a TV show. 

Flickr Photo/Roberta Schonborg

Steve Scher talks to the filmmaker Travis Rummell, dam engineer Jim Waddell and Jim Ahern, a Lewiston, Idaho, native,  about the new documentary "DamNation." The film discusses the change in attitudes towards dam and river health.

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle actor Shawn Telford about his first feature film, "BFE."  It's the story of disaffected youth in a small Idaho town. The film had its local premier at the Seattle International Film Festival.

John Jeffcoat, courtesy Matt Smith

Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood is hipster central these days: the place to go for the latest in music clubs, trendy restaurants and street style.

That wasn't always the case.

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Ross Reynolds interviews Bryan Storkel, the co-director of a new documentary called "Fight Church" about cage fighting Christian ministers, and Preston Hocker, one of those ministers who is known as the "Pastor of Disaster." 

AP Photo/Joel Ryan

David Hyde talks to Ed Catmull, the co-founder of Pixar Animation Studios and president of Pixar and Disney animation, about managing creative people and his new book "Creativity Inc: Overcoming The Unseen Forces That Stand In The Way Of True Inspiration."

At the German hotel where Jos Stelling's The Girl and Death takes place, the guests include everyone from incapacitated men and women patiently awaiting death (the hotel seems to function in part as a makeshift sanatorium) to lively if somewhat unhinged residents given to impromptu performances of Romeo and Juliet monologues in the dining hall.

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