military

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says that Canada will cease its airstrikes against self-proclaimed Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria by Feb. 22.

It will remain part of the coalition targeting the militants.

The Record: Wednesday, Feb. 3, Full Show

Feb 3, 2016
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KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

A Washington state lawmaker has resigned over allegations he misrepresented his military record. We don't know all the facts yet, but this does come up a lot. How often do people lie about military service and how much does it matter?

Also, Los Angeles has Koreatown, New York has Little Italy. Seattle has the International District, but one of our guests argues that we should also have an Africatown.

And the X-Files are back in Vancouver, B.C., which is not as big a deal as it used to be and we'll show you why.

Listen to the full show above or check out the individual stories:

Purple Heart
Flickr Photo/Phil Renaud (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ex7KSS

Bill Radke speaks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the resignation of Rep. Graham Hunt after allegations that the Washington state lawmaker exaggerated his military service record.

Also, Radke talks with Doug Sterner, a veteran who has spent decades investigating fraudulent claims of military service, for his take on why people distort, exaggerate, or lie about military service.

For the first time, top Army and Marine Corps leaders have testified that they think women should register for the draft.

"I think that all eligible and qualified men and women should register for the draft," Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley said during a hearing of the Senate Armed Services Committee.

Both Milley and Marine Gen. Robert Neller said women, like men, should be required to register for the Selective Service at age 18.

Recent government sanctions against predatory for-profit colleges that preyed on veterans by using inflated job promises have opened the window on the wider challenges of helping veterans transition from service to higher education.

A U.S. Marine, with Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, navigates under constantina wire during a bayonet course training evolution aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, Calif., June 1, 2012.
Flickr Photo/DVIDSHUB (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ciQaxY

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW military affairs reporter Patricia Murphy about the federal government taking back some surplus military equipment, but all they want from Washington state are its bayonets. 

Veterans serving time behind bars are still entitled to some — but not all — of the benefits earned through military service. Wednesday, we told you the story of the struggle one former inmate faced trying to inform the Department of Veterans Affairs about his incarceration. Today, we look at a one-of-a kind inmate-run program trying to help other incarcerated veterans work and communicate with the VA to get their benefits.

Clay Hull has a stubborn sense of justice.

After an improvised explosive device blast in Iraq ended his time in the military, he fought the Army and the Department of Veterans Affairs over the amount of compensation they awarded him for his injuries.

"If I'm in the wrong, I'll admit it. But I'm not going to let somebody just push me around, especially the VA," he says.

It was complicated and drawn out, but Hull now gets the maximum the VA pays for disability.

If you took a map of Chicago and put down a tack for each person shot last year, you'd need nearly 3,000 tacks.

Of those, 101 would be clustered in the neighborhood of East Garfield Park. That's where 15-year-old Jim Courtney-Clarks lives.

"To be honest, I really don't like it," Courtney-Clarks says. "Every time you look up somebody else is getting killed, and I never know if it's me or somebody I am really close to."

Officers of 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 'Ready First' 1st Armored Division, participate in an urban combat exercise at a training facility on Fort Bliss, Texas in 2011.
Flickr Photo/DVIDSHUB (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1njNs6z

William Kerby was exposed to repeated blasts when he was deployed to Iraq as a Marine infantryman.

“For instance, we were setting off a charge on a door or a gate to blow it open, and there’s nowhere really to go, so you basically turn away from it within a few feet,” Kerby said. “You can feel that kind of concussion, that shockwave, as it goes through your body.”

Less than 24 hours after reports of their detention emerged, 10 U.S. Navy personnel have been freed by Iran. The sailors left an Iranian naval base on Farsi Island in the Persian Gulf on Wednesday morning, along with the boats they were operating when they were taken into custody.

"There are no indications that the sailors were harmed during their brief detention," the Department of Defense says, confirming the release of nine men and one woman.

During World War II, thousands of Americans lied about their age to enlist in the military. During the Iraq war, Daniel Torres lied about something else.

"I didn't want to be just another Mexican living in the U.S. I wanted to say I'd done something for the country," said Torres.

Updated 5:20 a.m. ET Wednesday:

Iranian state TV announced that all 10 U.S. sailors held since Tuesday in Iran have been freed. The Pentagon has confirmed the report, and says there are no indications that the sailors were harmed during their detention.

Original Post:

Ten sailors were detained by Iranian authorities on Tuesday as they sailed from Kuwait to Bahrain aboard two small riverine patrol boats.

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Drew Perine/The News Tribune

Capt. Jennifer Peace is a tall, thin woman in a crisp uniform, with minimal makeup and shiny brown hair. But when soldiers call her ma’am, she has orders to correct them.

They must call her sir.

Capt. Peace, an intelligence officer stationed at Joint Base Lewis-McChord south of Seattle, is transgender. And although it’s been more than four years since the ban on openly gay servicemen and women was lifted, being transgender is still an issue in the US military.

A member of the Washington National Guard has emerged as a vocal supporter of the armed occupiers in eastern Oregon.

Staff Sgt. Maureen Peltier has served in the Guard since 2000. She even deployed to Iraq. But over the years she says she’s come to believe that corruption and a toxic environment exists in many parts of the U.S. government. Thus her interest in what she calls the patriot movement.

“I’ve been watching the patriot movement quietly for years while serving,” Peltier said.

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