government

U.S. Sen. Patty Murray, center, and U.S. Rep. Derek Kilmer, right, get a tour of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network from Paul Bodin, left, and John Vidale, rear.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The alert comes in on your cell phone: “Earthquake! Earthquake! Moderate shaking expected in 31 seconds.”

That could be just enough warning to let you take action that could save your life, say scientists building an earthquake emergency warning system on the West Coast.

Chris Cody at Herban Legends in White Center, the mostly unincorporated neighborhood just south of Seattle. The medical marijuana business recently received a letter from King County telling it to close.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

In the medical marijuana business, Seattle has determined that there are good guys and bad guys.

Seattle and King County recently sent letters to all medical marijuana businesses, warning them they need to close. Seattle sent two kinds of letters: one to “good guys” who have a good shot at getting a state license, and another to “bad guys” who probably won’t.

King County took a harder line, telling all the dispensaries in unincorporated areas to close.

The 70th Anniversary of the bombing of Nagasaki, Japan was remembered Sunday night in Richland, Washington. About 50 people gathered near the Columbia River to remember the day.

The fate of Washington’s 2016 presidential primary could hinge on a vote Tuesday. That’s when the state’s Presidential Primary Committee will meet to decide whether to move the primary up from May to March.

The B reactor at Hanford.
Flickr Photo/Gary Paulson (CC BY ND 2.0)

Todd Mundt speaks with Northwest News Network correspondent Anna King about the past and present of the Hanford nuclear site in eastern Washington. 

Activists from the Seattle chapter of Black Lives Matter took over the stage at a rally for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders on Sat., Aug 8, 2015. They called for four minutes of silence, and Sanders left the stage to greet those who had come to see him.
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

How Seattle reacted to the disruption of Bernie Sanders’ appearance at a rally this weekend reveals the city is still unwilling to honestly talk about race, an NAACP leader said Monday.

Gerald Hankerson, president of Seattle-King County NAACP, told KUOW’s Todd Mundt that the incident shows that’s “a difficult conversation to have, even with your allies.”

A year after Michael Brown, an unarmed black 18-year-old, was fatally shot by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo., sparking weeks of often violent protests in the city, the country is still struggling to deal with the issues the shooting, and others like it, have brought to the fore.

For four Saturdays this August, Pike Street between Broadway and 12th will be closed to car traffic.
Google Maps

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Heidi Hall, business districts advocate for the City of Seattle Office of Economic Development, about an experiment to make three blocks of Pike Street pedestrian only. The experiment will take place during four Saturday nights this August.

Kim Malcolm speaks with Vickie Ybarra, a former elected official on the Yakima school board, about how Latinos in Yakima are making their voices heard and what representation in the City Council means for the community. 

Seattle Washington ballot box vote
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

What did we learn from Seattle’s first district elections in a century? Why did so few people vote? Is the Port of Seattle about to get more kayaktivist-y? And which of the 17 GOP presidential candidates have the best shot with Washington state voters?

David Hyde steps in for Bill Radke this week to debate those questions and more of the week’s news with Democratic state Senator Pramila Jayapal, Q13 political analyst C.R. Douglas and former state Republican party chair Chris Vance.

The scene in the New Holly neighborhood after a drive-by shooting killed Zakariya Issa on Friday, July 31.
Courtesy of Salaxley TV

People in Seattle’s New Holly neighborhood say the killings of two young Somali men have shaken their faith in the police and they want more to be done to protect them.

This post was updated at 2:04 p.m. ET

Republican presidential hopefuls tossed around a lot of statistics during their debate last night. Some of those numbers are revealing. Others may be concealing or at least don't tell the whole story.

Here's a closer look now at some of the claims made by the candidates.

Claim 1 — Jeb Bush: "Our economy grew at double the rate of the nation. We created 1.3 million jobs. We led the nation seven out of those eight years."

City Councilmember Jean Godden at Bulldog News in the University District.
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

After 12 years on the Seattle City Council, Jean Godden conceded defeat Thursday in her race for a fourth term.

The frontlines of child protection in Washington are about to get a boost. The new state budget funds more than 40 new caseworker positions.

Slide the City had planned events at three places in Washington state but canceled them due to permitting issues.
Slide the City

The giant slip-and-slide event that was hyped on social media in Seattle, Spokane, or the Tri-Cities has now been canceled. All the excitement came to a halt over everyday health regulations. 

In Seattle, a big chunk of Mercer Street was to be closed Aug. 16 so people who plopped down $30 a ticket could take a wet-and-wild ride.

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