government

Ammon Bundy, center, one of the sons of Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, walks off after speaking with reporters during a news conference at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge headquarters Monday, Jan. 4, 2016, near Burns, Ore.
AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

Bill Radke speaks with Oregon Public Broadcasting reporter John Sepulvado about the future of the armed occupation at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge after the FBI arrested Ammon Bundy, the leader of the militant group. 

In a sign the armed occupation of a federal wildlife refuge may be winding down, the FBI announced late Wednesday that eight people had left the compound. Five were released and three arrested.

The FBI said in a statement:

"All [three] were in contact with the FBI, and each chose to turn himself into [sic] agents at a checkpoint outside the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. The arrests were without incident.

No country is free of public corruption, a scourge that has wide-ranging effects on the lives of billions of people. But in 2015, more countries saw drops in corruption than those that saw gains, according to the new Corruption Perceptions Index.

Bill Radke speaks with King County Councilmember Joe McDermott about his bid to replace 14-term U.S. Congressman Jim McDermott (no relation).

Ever since a tense, armed standoff near Cliven Bundy's Nevada ranch in 2014, a vast and sensitive piece of federal public land adjacent to the Grand Canyon has gone unmanaged and unpatrolled.

It's safe to travel into the area called Gold Butte so long as you're not in a federal vehicle, according to Jaina Moan of Friends of Gold Butte, which wants to see the area federally protected.

The last time there was any known federal presence was last summer, when scientists under contract with the Bureau of Land Management were camped here, gathering field research.

A panel of the Idaho House of Representatives voted Tuesday to add a state income tax cut to the legislative session agenda.

The Washington Department of Corrections has finished re-calculating the sentences of 1,500 inmates who were potentially released early since 2011. Of those, more than 100 must return to prison to finish their sentences.

Oregon Governor Kate Brown wants state lawmakers to approve roughly $500,000 in emergency funding to cover costs associated with the armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.

California is beginning its analysis of how three Klamath River hydroelectric dams are affecting water quality.

The state is in the middle of a series of scoping meetings, providing the public its first official chance to weigh in since the Klamath Basin Water Agreements fell apart at the end of December.

The Record: Tuesday, Jan 26, Full Show

Jan 26, 2016
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Seattle's mayor says homelessness is dividing the city into two overheated, unrealistic conversations. He'll tell you the solutions that he calls "reality-based." 

A Seattle animal researcher will tell you why she wants your vacation photos -- yes, even your iPhone snapshots can help her.

And a survivor of rape at a Seattle Catholic school wants to know why his attacker was not on that list released by the Seattle Archdiocese.

Listen to the full show above or check out the individual stories:

 Jaxon Ravens, chairman of the Washington State Democratic Party
Flickr Photo/Ronald Woan (CC BY NC 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1JCLnwP

Bill Radke speaks with Jaxon Ravens, chairman of the Washington State Democratic Party, about voters' feelings on the economy as we head into the 2016 election year. He said that middle class incomes have struggled to keep pace, but as a whole the state has been doing very well. 

Bill Radke speaks with Susan Hutchison, chairman of the Washington State Republican Party, about voters' feelings on the economy as we head into the 2016 election year. She said there's a difference between those who live in downtown Seattle -- who have a sense that the engine is roaring due to Amazon -- and those who live in smaller cities or Eastern Washington. 

Highline school bus driver Rodger Fowler shows off his stop paddle – and (in the lower-right corner) the camera that captures motorists who ignore the paddle.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

Bill Radke talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about differing education bills out of the Democratic-led House and Republican-controlled Senate in the state capitol this week.

A homeless camp beneath an Interstate 5 off-ramp in Seattle's SODO district.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray is worried that the issue of homelessness is dividing the city. He said there are two conversations happening in Seattle, and neither of them are productive. 

"One is that the homeless are criminal drug addicts, and the other is that the city is just trying to sweep the homeless out of the right-of-way of the freeway or off our sidewalks to hide the problem."

Every four years, Iowans are deluged with the talking points, the stump speeches, the polls and, of course, the ads.

They also hear that they shouldn't be first. Iowans are too white, too old and too few to merit first-in-the-nation status, say the critics.

But if Iowa shouldn't be first, who should be? For more than a century, reformers have been proposing ideas for how to change the primary system. And they've been failing. And they'll probably continue to fail.

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