government

A measure that was added to the November ballot less than a month ago would have imposed fines on rail cars transporting fossil fuels through the heart of Spokane. On Monday night, the city council opted to withdraw it.

An artist's rendering of the proposed new North Precinct station for the Seattle Police Department.
City of Seattle

The Seattle City Council will take a new look at the cost of a controversial police building.

But the project is moving ahead.

Two weeks ago, the Spokane City Council approved a ballot measure that garnered national attention. It would impose a fine on every rail car that transports coal or oil through the heart of the city.  Monday the council could consider its withdrawal.

A tent in the Jungle, a Seattle homeless encampment believed to have grown out of the original homeless hobo jungle during the Great Depression of the 1930s.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's growth and development reporter Joshua McNichols about the city's plan to close down the homeless encampment under Interstate 5 known as the Jungle and what will happen to the people that live there. 

Bill Radke speaks with Dylan Orr, director of Seattle's Office of Labor Standards, about the new secure scheduling rules proposed by the city and what they would mean for local businesses and workers. 

A bipartisan coalition of Western U.S. lawmakers has renewed a call to change how the federal government pays to put out big forest fires. Currently, the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management divert money from fire prevention and other programs to pay firefighting costs during bad fire years.

The chairman of Donald Trump's presidential campaign says he never received a single off-the-books cash payment for political work in Ukraine.

The statement from campaign chairman Paul Manafort comes after The New York Times reported that his name appears in a so-called "black ledger" recording under-the-table payments made by the political party of Ukraine's former pro-Russian president, Viktor Yanukovych.

From left, Sydney Brownstone, Bill Radke, Ijeoma Oluo and Jonathan Martin.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Seattle City Council passed a law that would prevent landlords from discriminating against potential tenants. It is another step towards preventing inequity. But can the city fix the larger issue of affordability?

Ballot drop box in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Kim Malcolm speaks with Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman about election fraud and whether or not it could happen in Washington state. 

It’s been 18 years since Republicans last controlled both chambers of the Washington legislature. They’re hoping 2016 is the year they can reclaim the majority. But that will require holding on to their narrow grip on the state Senate and flipping the Washington House -- something Democrats are determined not to let happen.

New York Times reporter Rukmini Callimachi is known for her in-depth reporting on terrorism and the Islamic State. Her recent jailhouse interview with Harry Sarfo, a German citizen who joined ISIS and trained in Syria before disavowing the group, revealed the organization's particular interest in recruits from Europe.

The question is repeated in one form or another millions of times a day in social media and random conversation. It comes primarily from the backers of Donald Trump, but also from others — including the simply curious:

Why are the media obsessed with Trump's controversies and not Clinton's?

Tony Ventrella dropped out of the race for Washington's 8th Congressional District, but jumped back in after the primary results.
Facebook Photo/Tony Ventrella for Congress

First, former Seattle area sportscaster Tony Ventrella jumped into the race. Then, he jumped out. But his name stayed on the ballot.

And then he surprised everyone, including himself, when he came in second in the top-two primary last month. That got him – a candidate who was out – back into the general election in November against six-term Republican Representative Dave Reichert.


Apartment buildings in Seattle
Flickr photo/N i c o l a (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/peTBEw

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle landlord Hugh Brannon about a new ordinance the Seattle City Council passed this week.

The measure aims to reduce housing discrimination through a series of mechanisms, but Brannon explains why he believes certain aspects of this law are counterproductive and take the "human element" out of being a landlord.

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about how Canadians are reacting to Trump's run for the presidency. One worry is that if Trump wins the White House it will mean an end to NAFTA. 

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